Course Catalog | Pierpont C&TC

Academic Development

Online Tutorial Practicum
1
CH(s)

This course is designed to equip tutors with the necessary skills to effectively communicate with students in an individual and group setting. The course entails an orientation to tutorial procedures and assignments that emphasize specific skills such as tutoring special populations, tutoring study skills, and recognizing diverse response styles. The course is a requirement for all new tutors; instructor permission is required for registration.

Accounting

Fundamentals of Accounting
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course provides a brief but comprehensive introduction to accounting. It gives students a basic understanding of accounting principles and procedures used for recording, classifying, and summarizing financial data. Students also learn accounting terminology and are introduced to the financial forms, records, and statements used in the business world.

Guided Experience I
1-4
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course will be a guided experience for community college students to explore topics of interest in their field through research, field experience, presentation, computer applications, lab experience, or other project agreed upon between the student and the supervising faculty and is submitted to the dean in a written contract. Credits earned may be applied as free electives in degree or certificate programs.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s), PR: Instructor Approval Required
Principles of Accounting I
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

This course covers fundamental accounting theory and procedures: organization of accounts, the accounting cycle, working papers and the preparation of financial and operating statements for proprietorships.

Principles of Accounting II
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

The second semester of this course is a further study of the accounting process as applied to various business organizations. The two semesters of this course are designed to give students an adequate understanding of the recording, classifying and summarizing of business transactions in order to proceed with the interpretation and analysis of accounting data. This is a basic course for accounting majors, majors in other areas of business administration, and those whose major interest is in economics, political science, law or other professional areas.

Prerequisite(s):
ACCT 2201
Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only
Managerial Accounting
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

The managerial accounting course is designed to acquaint students with the use of accounting information for the purpose of managerial control and decision-making. Concepts of cost, profit, and budgeting will be discussed and aspects of performance measurement and evaluation will also be covered.

Prerequisite(s):
ACCT 2202, OFAD 2220
Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only, All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Income Tax Procedures
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

An introduction to the concepts of income taxation and the applications of these concepts through problem solving with the use of tax forms.

Prerequisite(s):
ACCT 2202
Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only
Concepts of Computerized Accounting (QuickBooks)
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course is designed to reinforce topics presented in Principles of Accounting and to introduce the student to computerized accounting methods. Through hands-on computer work, the student will become familiar with accounting software (QuickBooks) and have the opportunity to work in greater depth with accounting topics. Completion of this course will provide students with the skills needed to attain certification in QuickBooks.

Prerequisite(s):
ACCT 2201
Payroll Accounting
3
CH(s)

Students in this course will learn about various state and federal laws that pertain to computing and paying wages and salaries.  The student will become proficient in calculating gross pay, calculating Social Security, and Medicare taxes, calculating federal and state income and other taxes, journalizing and posting payroll entries and completing various federal and state forms.

Prerequisite(s):
ACCT 2201
Guided Experience II
1-4
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course will be an advanced guided experience for community college students to explore topics of interest in their field through research, field experience, presentation, computer applications, lab experience, or other project agreed upon between the student and the supervising faculty and is submitted to the dean in a written contract. Credits earned may be applied as free electives in degree or certificate programs.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s), PR: Instructor Approval Required
Professional Internship and Portfolio Development
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

The purpose of this course is to allow students to bring business topics into focus by using all their collected business knowledge. This will be accomplished through completion of a portfolio that will demonstrate to prospective employers the student’s career preparation. Students will also be required to complete a professional internship in the workplace. The importance of career and goal planning will be emphasized.

Other Info:
PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:

A total of 140 hours of supervised work will be required. Capstone course. PR: Instructor Approval.

American Sign Language Communication

Deaf Culture and Deaf Studies (Online Only)
3
CH(s)

This online course provides an introduction to Deaf culture. Students will study Deaf history from the 1800s to the present.

ASL Fingerspelling (Online Only)
1
CH(s)

This course will develop skill in expressive and receptive fingerspelling and numbers with emphasis on the proper form and use of the manual alphabet and numbers. Students will fingerspell fluently, accurately, and concisely.

Prerequisite(s):
AMSL 1111
Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only
Introduction to American Sign Language (Online Only)
2
CH(s)

This course introduces an array of vocabulary and skill sets required to learn American Sign Language. Vocabulary and skill sets include: people, cities, states, numbers, and basic conversation.

Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only
Note:

ITTP majors only.

ASL Classifiers
3
CH(s)

Students explore, analyze and perform American Sign Language Classifiers. Classifiers are used to show movement, location and appearance. Emphasis is placed on the purpose, use of space, developing and demonstrating classifiers using appropriate handshapes, as well as the use of proper non-manual markers.

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

ITTP majors only.

ASL Linguistics
3
CH(s)

This course provides four major topics: Language, Language and Culture, American Sign Language Structure, and Language Variation. This course consists of 3 hours of lecture.

Prerequisite(s):
AMSL 1111
Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only
American Sign Language I (1st 8 week Fall)
3
CH(s)

In this course attention is given to the proper syntax and basic grammatical constructs. Over 500 signs will be used in this course enabling the student to express basic ideas. Non-verbal and pantomime will be emphasized.

Note:
  • This course consists of 6 hours of lecture and 3 hours of lab per week.
  • Fall Semester: offered in an 8-week format.
  • Spring Semester: a 16-week online version is available for students not yet enrolled but interested in exploring ITTP major.
American Sign Language II (2nd 8 week Fall)
3
CH(s)

Students continue to develop sign vocabulary with an introduction to idiomatic phrases. Emphasis will be placed on the use of classifiers, expressions, body posture, and signing space.

Corequisite(s):
AMSL 1111
Prerequisite(s):
AMSL 1111
Other Info:
At least one listed Prerequisite/Co-requisite Required
Note:
  • Fall Semester: 8-week class requiring 6 hours of lecture and 3 hours of lab each week.
  • Summer Semester: 16-week online version is available for students not yet enrolled but interested in exploring ITTP major.
American Sign Language III (1st 8 week Spring)
3
CH(s)

This course intensifies sign vocabulary. Students use familiar signs and learn the differences in meaning through the use of non-manual gestures. Students will be able to engage in full conversations using the nature context of American Sign Language.

Prerequisite(s):
AMSL 1112
Note:
  • Spring Semester: 8-week course requiring 6 hours of lecture and 3 hours of lab each week.
  • Fall Semester: 16-week online version is available for students not yet enrolled but who are interested in exploring ITTP major.
American Sign Language IV (2nd 8 week Spring)
3
CH(s)

Slang, “home signs”, idioms and signs that have become obsolete or are native to specific geographic areas are learned and used.

Corequisite(s):
AMSL 1113
Prerequisite(s):
AMSL 1113
Other Info:
At least one listed Prerequisite/Co-requisite Required
Note:
  • This course is an eight week class requiring 6 hours of lecture and 3 hours of lab each week.
  • Fall Semester: offered in an eight week format.
  • Spring Semester: a sixteen week online version is available for students not yet enrolled but interested in exploring ITTP major.
Non-Manual Signals
3
CH(s)

Students focus on grammar features, producing and recognizing how the functions of non manual signals affect the structure of ASL at the phonemic, morphological, syntactic and semantic level.

Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

ITTP majors only.

Applied Design

Basic Skills for Fashion Design
3
CH(s)

This is an introductory course for fashion majors to introduce basic textile and construction concepts. Students will gain basic skills in equipment use, machine operation, construction techniques, and use and types of various textiles, as a foundation for careers in fashion.

Principles of Clothing Construction
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

The student will study the application of principles of clothing construction in relationship to selection of compatible fabric and design to produce garments for individuals. The student will use various fabrics during the development of construction techniques, and will study the use and care of equipment and the techniques in pattern alterations.

Apparel Design
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course explores the fashion design industry from creation of the designer collection through retail merchandising. The students will create their own collection and develop a merchandising plan. Apparel design software will be used, in addition to traditional design and rendering techniques.

Clothing & Culture
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course is a cross-cultural study of clothing for the individual, family, and special needs groups. The course will cover fashion trends, fashion terminology, clothing and behavior, color and computer-aided body analysis, professional dress and management, and socio-psychological aspects of clothing.

Introduction to the Fashion Industry
3
CH(s)

An overview of the fashion industry, past and present, with emphasis on career opportunities, the impact of fashion on world economy, and the fashion marketing system from manufacturer to consumer.

History of Contemporary Fashion
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

The study of historical costume from ancient times through modern costume will be covered to understand the impact of historical costume on contemporary design. Students will participate in research, restoration and display of period garments from the Masquers Historical Costume Collection.

History of Design Through 19th Century
3
CH(s)

This course will introduce the student to major areas of design history.  Students of all curricula will have a better understanding of the history of design and its influences on today's products. The course will cover major design trends spanning from ancient civilizations and the Renaissance to European influences in Colonial America, through the Victorian era.

History of 20th Century Design
3
CH(s)

This survey course will introduce the student to major design periods during the 20th century. Students of all curricula will have a foundational understanding of the history of design and its influences on today’s product development and trends in the market. Topics covered will include major designers and the periods of Art Nouveau, Art Deco, and the rise of Modern Design, as well as the impact of technological advances and global events of the century. 

Introduction to Interior Design
3
CH(s)

This course will include historical overview covering architectural and furniture periods, materials and components of Interior Design, and the design process through an introduction to drafting tools and techniques.

Design Concepts
3
CH(s)

This course will explore the principles and elements of design and will allow students to apply their knowledge in a series of projects, both two and three dimensional with a variety of materials and media. Focus will be on how the basic principles apply to Fashion and Interior Design.

Construction Details & Design
3
CH(s)

This course is to acquaint the student with the basic information required to understand and interpret construction documents and details as they apply to the interior design field. The course will explore the various components necessary to present and clearly illustrate a variety of drawing types used in the profession, as well as, the terminology associated with these techniques. In addition, this course will introduce the student to the practice of communicating design decisions and intended construction quality to other building professionals through working drawings.

Guided Experience I
1-4
CH(s)

This course will be a guided experience for community college students to explore topics of interest in their field through research, field experience, presentation, computer applications, lab experience, or other project agreed upon between the student and the supervising faculty and is submitted to the dean in a written contract.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s), PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:

Credits earned may be applied as free electives in degree or certificate programs.

Special Topics in Applied Design
0-4
CH(s)

Studies in special selected topics, to be determined by the instructor and approved by the School Dean. 

Note:
  • Credits earned will be applicable as free electives in associate and certificate of applied science degree programs.
  • Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 1199 Special Topics designation. 
  • Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course. 
Design Thinking
3
CH(s)

This course establishes the value of design thinking, identifies the components of the design thinking process, and helps students develop proficiency by using the design thinking process in multiple contexts. Topics will include components of design thinking, including solution-based thinking, analysis versus synthesis, divergent thinking versus convergent thinking, and design thinking as a process for problem solving.

Advanced Apparel Design
3
CH(s)

This course further develops student design abilities through the creation of an original collection. The role of the designer from fashion concept through merchandised products will be studied with emphasis on design principles and elements, silhouette, style, and fabrication in a variety of apparel categories. Computer based design will be included. Emphasis is on developing an original collection and portfolio development.

Prerequisite(s):
APPD 1102
Textiles
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

The study of textile fibers from origin to end use will be covered. Consideration will be given to properties of textile fibers in relationship to performance and use, textile selection, maintenance for apparel and home furnishings, and textiles in the world economy.

Visual Merchandising
3
CH(s)

Visual merchandising for retail stores will be covered in this course. Both window and interior display will be included. Students will plan a store layout to include visual display areas. The student will plan and execute creative displays, applying principles of merchandise selection, development of a theme, props and layout, lighting, and targeting the customer, at in-house and/or off campus sites.

Prerequisite(s):
APPD 1115, APPD 1140
Other Info:
At least one listed Prerequisite/Co-requisite Required
Fashion Accessories
3
CH(s)
This course will cover the broad spectrum of fashion accessories and the business of design, manufacturing, and marketing. The fashion accessories business is a critical partner within the fashion business. The history of the accessories market will be covered including the wide range of materials, both natural and man-made. The accessories industry includes men’s, women’s, and the expanding children’s market. This course will survey the current domestic and global markets. 
Design in Social Media
3
CH(s)

This course will explore the way the Web has become an extension of daily life and a major way people interact. This interaction is critical to business. Students will learn the importance of their digital footprint, how business practices are being transformed by emerging capabilities of mobile smart devices and a variety of dominate Web components, particularly social media, coupled with content sharing, and web applications, causing organizations to rethink the way businesses connect with their customers, employees, and stakeholders

Prerequisite(s):
ENGL 1104, OFAD 1150
Residential Design
3
CH(s)

Coordination of interior design components allows the students to develop and apply complete room plans and decorating schemes for various residential and commercial applications. Color, lighting, space needs and materials are covered.

Prerequisite(s):
APPD 1140
Design in Home Furnishings
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

The principles and elements of design are explored through an examination of home furnishings and accessories. The course will include a study of interior textiles, furnishings, window treatments, and the appropriate selection of enrichment accessories. Computer-aided design will be included.

Kitchen and Bath Design
3
CH(s)

This course focuses on the coordination of interior design components. Through this course the students will develop and apply complete space plans, floor plans, and design schemes for Kitchen and Bath applications. The students will use kitchen specification plan guidelines to build cabinet components as well as using appropriate multipliers to determine retail, cost, and selling pricing of their finished product and design. In addition, areas of appropriate cabinetry, kitchen mechanical systems, Drawing and Presentation standards, electrical/ lighting, appropriate placement of materials, finishes, codes, function of space, and equipment are covered.

Prerequisite(s):
APPD 1140
Contract Design
3
CH(s)

This course covers the design of various non-residential and public spaces with an emphasis on space planning, presentation skills, professional practices, interior systems, furnishings, and equipment. Students explore space as it relates to functional and aesthetic requirements including commercial code and access issues. Emphasis is on portfolio development.

Prerequisite(s):
APPD 1140
Guided Experience II
1-4
CH(s)

This course will be an advanced guided experience for community college students to explore topics of interest in their field through research, field experience, presentation, computer applications, lab experience, or other project agreed upon between the student and the supervising faculty and is submitted to the dean in a written contract.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s), PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:

Credits earned may be applied as free electives in degree or certificate programs.

Special Topics in Applied Design
0-4
CH(s)

This course will provide an opportunity for students to further their study of principles and concepts in the field and to apply their knowledge in a variety of application both in the traditional classroom setting and in work/job related experiences. The class will be an individualized, arranged course, with learning outcomes determined by the instructor in consultation with the student and permission of the School Dean.

Note:
  • Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 2299 Special Topics designation. 
  • Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course.
Applied Design Practicum
3
CH(s)

Students will be placed in various businesses in the interior or fashion field to provide on-site training and experience. Preparation of an electronic portfolio and resume will be included.

Prerequisite(s):
APPD 1115, APPD 1140
Other Info:
At least one listed Prerequisite/Co-requisite Required
Note:

Capstone Course.

Applied Technology

Applied Technology Workplace Skills
2
CH(s)

This course is designed to prepare the student for successful employment in the workforce, interaction within the community, appreciation of lifelong learning and commitment to self.  Presentations end of program exam, community service and teamwork assignments will be given. 

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

Technical Studies and Applied Technology Majors only.
To be taken Final Semester of Program.
30 contact-hour lecture.

Architecture

Architectural History I
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

This course covers architectural history from prehistoric times through the Gothic period. The emphasis will be on the historical, social and technological factors behind the structures discussed.

Architectural History II
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

This course is a continuation of architectural history, covering the Renaissance period to the present. The emphasis will be on the historical, social and technological factors behind the structures discussed.

Prerequisite(s):
ARCH 1130

Art

Art Appreciation
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This introductory course is a study of art of the Western world. It explores the emergence of new forms and salient factors contributing to changes in art from prehistoric Europe to the contemporary West. The works of art are presented within their historical contexts.

Design I: 2D
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

The elements and principles of two-dimensional design are explored in this Foundations course. Students learn the vocabulary of two-dimensional design, and apply scholarly responses to visual images. Students explore, through visual problem-solving, issues of composition, color theory, content, and presentation. Students work with a variety of two-dimensional media in this studio course. Reading and writing assignments accompany studio coursework.

Design II: 3D
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

The elements and principles of three-dimensional design are explored in this Foundations course. Students learn the vocabulary of three-dimensional design, and apply scholarly responses to visual images. Students explore, through visual problem-solving, issues of space, inherent properties of materials, and content in the three-dimensional realm. Students work with a variety of three-dimensional media in this studio course. Reading and writing assignments accompany studio coursework.

Drawing I: Foundations of Drawing
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This introductory course focuses on the traditions of drawing. Space, form, value, proportion, and composition are emphasized for the development of the beginning student’s ability to perceive and record forms on a two-dimensional surface. Students use a variety of drawing media as they work toward an understanding of the technical, expressive, and conceptual possibilities of mark-making.

Drawing II: Drawing from Life
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

Drawing from the posed model, accompanied by analytical studies of anatomy.

Prerequisite(s):
ARTD 1140, ARTD 1142
Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only, All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Painting: Foundations of Painting
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

Painting I is an introductory course in oil painting. Materials, tools, techniques, and stretcher construction are emphasized. Students explore the relationships among paint application, color theory, design elements, representation, and expressive intent.

Prerequisite(s):
ARTD 1140, ARTD 1142
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Sculpture I: Foundations of Sculpture
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This introductory course in sculpture explores materials, tools, techniques and design principles related to the creation of three dimensional objects.

Prerequisite(s):
ARTD 1141

Graphics Technology

Illustration and Publication
3
CH(s)
Graphics Communications Processes
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

An introduction to and a survey of the discipline of graphics design and technology. The topics include a survey of the graphics industry, the knowledge base and history of graphic design, and an examination of graphics technologies and careers as well as an overview of available resources for study and research in computer graphics.

Fundamentals of Graphic Design
3
CH(s)
Multimedia Concepts
3
CH(s)

Basic techniques of computer presentation and multimedia will be covered. Students will use introductory software for the creation of digital animation, motion, and multimedia. Activities include exercises using Microsoft PowerPoint, Apple QuickTime, and still and motion digital video capturing.

Vector & Raster Imaging
3
CH(s)
Students will learn about the properties of various digital image files, formats, specifications and their use in both internet and print applications. Using industry standard Vector and Raster image editing programs, students will learn various image and digital artwork creation and manipulation techniques. Students will create vector artwork and raster images suitable for web design, print media and digital screen design.
Computer Applications to Graphics
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

An introduction to the Apple computer and operating system, containing a thorough coverage of computer fundamentals with an introduction to industry standard graphics software.

Guided Experience I VAR
1-4
CH(s)

This course will be a guided experience for community college students to explore topics of interest in their field through research, field experience, presentation, computer applications, lab experience, or other project agreed upon between the student and the supervising faculty and is submitted to the dean in a written contract.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s), PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:

Credits earned may be applied as free electives in degree or certificate programs. 

Special Topics in Graphic Communications
0-4
CH(s)

Studies in special selected topics, to be determined by the instructor and approved by the School Dean.  Credits earned will be applicable as free electives in associate and certificate of applied science degree programs.

Note:
  • Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 1199 Special Topics designation. 
  • Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course.   
Graphic Design I
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This is a studio course introducing the process of graphic design including the principles of design and problem solving methodologies for page layout and 2-dimensional design. 

Prerequisite(s):
GRAP 1100
Graphic Design II
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This studio course is a continuation of GRAP 2230. It focuses on developing competence in hand skills required for graphic design and introduces 3-dimensional design and presentation techniques. 

Prerequisite(s):
GRAP 2230
Photography Concepts
3
CH(s)

This course will emphasize the use of traditional and digital photography in the profession of graphic design. Topics will include the historical evolution of photography; major related equipment, materials, principles, methods, and techniques of photography; and the application of photography in areas of visual communication, journalism, web design, and other Graphic Design fields. 

Prerequisite(s):
GRAP 1150
Internet Animation
3
CH(s)

This course is an introduction to basic techniques of computer animation and presentation for multimedia and internet and interactive training applications. 

Prerequisite(s):
GRAP 1125
Emerging Technologies
3
CH(s)

New kinds of electronic tools are emerging that allow graphic designers to craft presentations, images and layouts in a collaborative environment.  This course will explore available technologies and software and explore new approaches to digital design and data visualization.  

Social Media Management
2
CH(s)
Estimating and Cost Analysis
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course explores introductory critical thinking and analysis for the media artist including the topics of project pricing, estimating and budgeting, marketing and self-promotion.

Prerequisite(s):
GRAP 1100, GRAP 2230
Internet Publishing
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course is an introduction to basic web design principles, applications and related terminology. A professional web authoring tool is explored to understand the planning and layout of hypertext based content for the web. 

Prerequisite(s):
GRAP 1150
Electronic Art
3
CH(s)

This course acquaints students with the processes of a vector drawing program on the computer. Students learn how to use the tools to create digital artwork that can be used in web design, print media and digital screen design. 

Prerequisite(s):
GRAP 1150
Guided Experience II VAR
1-4
CH(s)

This course will be an advanced guided experience for community college students to explore topics of interest in their field through research, field experience, presentation, computer applications, lab experience, or other project agreed upon between the student and the supervising faculty and is submitted to the dean in a written contract. 

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s), PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:

Credits earned may be applied as free electives in degree or certificate programs. 

Image Editing
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

Students will learn the properties of various digital image files and their use in both internet and print applications. Using an industry standard image editing program, students will learn various image manipulation techniques. Copyright issues, ethical usage of images on the Web, and explanation of the different resolution requirements between Web and print images will also be discussed.

Prerequisite(s):
GRAP 1150
Special Topics in Graphics Communications
0-4
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course will provide an opportunity for students to further their study of principles and concepts in the field and to apply their knowledge in a variety of application both in the traditional classroom setting and in work/job related experiences. The class will be an individualized, arranged course, with learning outcomes determined by the instructor in consultation with the student and permission of the School Dean. 

Note:
  • Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 2299 Special Topics designation. 
  • Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course.  
Graphics Practicum
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This is a capstone course in which the student participates in an internship in the graphics field with a cooperating business. Capstone internships consist of a minimum of 10 hours of service per week or a total of 150 hours. Students must have completed a minimum of 45 hours of course work and the internship must be approved by the course instructor and department coordinator before registering. In addition to the hours of service, daily work logs, participation in online discussions and an 8-10 page final written report as well as an oral presentation approved by the instructor are required.

Other Info:
PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:

Capstone course.

Avionics

Aircraft Power Generation & Distribution Systems
3
CH(s)

This course examines DC and AC power generation systems, generator paralleling, voltage regulation, power distribution and circuit protection devices, and DC and AC machines used in aircraft systems. Emphasis is on developing an understanding of the systems adequate to test, inspect, troubleshoot, and repair at the system and component levels.

Prerequisite(s):
AVMT 1109
Note:

Must have a "C" grade or better to pass.

Special Topics in Avionics
1-4
CH(s)

Studies in special selected topics, to be determined by the instructor and approved by the School Dean.  Credits earned will be applicable as free electives in associate and certificate of applied science degree programs.

Note:
  • Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 1199 Special Topics designation. 
  • Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course. 

Aviation Administration

Aircraft Flight Theory
3
CH(s)

A study of the subject areas and information needed to operate as a private pilot in the aviation environment.

Note:

Must have a "C" grade or better to pass.

Air Rescue Fire Fighting
3
CH(s)

This course is designed to provide the beginning student with a basic understanding of the principles and methodology of Air Rescue and Fire Fighting in aircraft incidents both on and off the airfield. It reviews the physics of fire and the different types of fires that are extinguished during the first responders handling of different aircraft emergencies. The student will be able to identify the different types of firefighting retardants and the correct application of each. The student will be trained in the correct procedures for approaching aircraft in emergency situations, gaining access to crashed aircraft, the safe extraction of survivors, and basic triage procedures. The students will also be able to explain how to secure a crash site and the damaged aircraft. They will also have an understanding of the handling of hazardous materials at the scene of an incident.

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:
  • Must have a “C” grade or better to pass.
  • Homeland Security majors only.
Guided Experience I VAR
1-4
CH(s)

This course will be a guided experience for community college students to explore topics of interest in their field through research, field experience, presentation, computer applications, lab experience, or other project agreed upon between the student and the supervising faculty and is submitted to the dean in a written contract.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s), PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:

Credits earned may be applied as free electives in degree or certificate programs.

Special Topics in Aviation Administration
0-4
CH(s)

Studies in special selected topics, to be determined by the instructor and approved by the School Dean.  Credits earned will be applicable as free electives in associate and certificate of applied science degree programs. 

Note:
  • Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 1199 Special Topics designation. 
  • Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course. 
Aviation Law
3
CH(s)

A study of the legal issues and case law/decisions affecting the Aviation industry.  Topics covered include contracts, liabilities, rights or operators, criminal statutes and the US legal system, as applied to aviation. 

Note:

Must have a "C" grade or better to pass.

Airline Operations
3
CH(s)

A study of the administrative aspects of airline operation and management, including a detailed study of airline organization, structure and operational issues.  Topics to be covered include airline history, economics, pricing, marketing, fleet planning and labor relations.  A case study approach will be used to study individual airlines and/or airline-related issues.

Note:

Must have a "C" grade or better to pass.

Airline Operations
3
CH(s)

A study of the general aviation industry, including general aviation aircraft manufacturing, fixed-based operations and corporate flight departments.  A basic definition of general aviation, its role and major components will be covered.  The course also has a business development assignment during which the students develop and present a business plan for a proposed aviation company.

Prerequisite(s):
ENGL 1109
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

Must have a "C" grade or better to pass.

Aviation Security
3
CH(s)

This course is designed to provide the beginning student with a basic understanding of the history of aircraft security in the aviation industry. The changing nature of aviation security over the years and how it has impacted society will be discussed. It will discuss and analyze the different methodologies of aviation security both in domestic and foreign methodologies. The course will also examine the industries responses to the changes in aircraft security in both general, corporate, and transport aviation. It will also address the needs of aviation personnel for security both in the air and on the ground.

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

Aviation or Homeland Security Majors Only.

Aviation Safety
3
CH(s)

This course introduces the student to various aspects of aviation safety, including flight safety, ground safety and management and planning for safety in aviation. Case studies of individual aviation incidents, safety studies and accidents will be presented.

Airport Management
3
CH(s)

This course presents a study of airfield operations, and management with a focus on the role of the airport manager, the role of the airport in the community, budgeting, marketing and tenant relationships.

Note:

Must have a "C" grade or better to pass.

Airport Planning & Development
3
CH(s)

The principles of airport system planning and airport master planning will be studied. Airport design standards, historical evolution of airports, key airport legislation and environmental impact planning for airports are key course topics.

Note:

Must have a "C" grade or better to pass.

Airline Transport Security
3
CH(s)

This course is designed to provide the beginning student with a basic understanding of the airline transport security system currently in use at major airports around the world. The student will be trained in security considerations at both the airport terminal and in the air. The student will be familiar security requirements as set by the Transportation Security Administration.

The student will demonstrate knowledge of security responsibilities of screeners and other security personnel, submission to screening and inspection, procedures security and handling of interference with screening personnel, carriage of weapons, explosives, and incendiaries by individuals. The student will demonstrate knowledge of security of a secured area, security of the air operations area, security of the security identification display area, access control systems, and Law enforcement support. The student will be trained in procedures currently in place to provide in-flight safety of the crew and airline passengers.

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:
  • Must have a "C" grade or better to pass.
  • Aviation or Homeland Security majors only.
Guided Experience II
1-4
CH(s)

This course will be an advanced guided experience for community college students to explore topics of interest in their field through research, field experience, presentation, computer applications, lab experience, or other project agreed upon between the student and the supervising faculty and is submitted to the dean in a written contract.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s), PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:

Credits earned may be applied as free electives in degree or certificate programs.

Special Topics in Aviation Administration
0-4
CH(s)

This course will provide an opportunity for students to further their study of principles and concepts in the field and to apply their knowledge in a variety of application both in the traditional classroom setting and in work/job related experiences. The class will be an individualized, arranged course, with learning outcomes determined by the instructor in consultation with the student and permission of the School Dean.

Note:
  • Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 2299 Special Topics designation. 
  • Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course. 

Aviation Maintenance

Introduction to Aviation Maintenance
3
CH(s)

A study of the fundamentals of Aviation Maintenance. Topics include: aircraft familiarization, nomenclature, materials, hardware used on aircraft, theory of flight, and basic physics.

Note:
  • Meets FAR 147 requirements.
  • Must have a “C” grade or better to pass.
Aircraft Regulations & Publications
3
CH(s)

A study of federal aviation regulations, maintenance publications, weight and balance, technical drawings, charts and graphs.

Note:
  • Meets FAR 147 requirements.
  • Must have a “C” grade or better to pass.
Aviation Shop Practices
3
CH(s)

A study of the use of basic hand tools and power equipment, shop safety, aircraft fluid lines and fittings, aircraft cleaning and corrosion control. The use and care of precision measuring equipment and the use and interpretation of various non-destructive inspection methods.

Note:
  • Meets FAR 147 requirements.
  • Must have a “C” grade or better to pass.
Aircraft Utility Systems
3
CH(s)

This course covers the areas of airframe ice and rain control systems, fire protection systems, (airframe and engine), and fuel systems (airframe and engine). Also included are transport aircraft systems including doors, lavatory systems, galley systems, passenger service units, windows, emergency equipment, and cargo loading systems.

Note:
  • Meets FAR 147 requirements.
  • Must have a “C” grade or better to pass.
Aviation Electronics
3
CH(s)

This course examines the fundamental principles of electronics as applied to aircraft electrical systems. Specific topics covered include AC/DC, series-parallel circuits, circuit analysis theorems, transistors, digital theory and devices.

Corequisite(s):
AVMT 1101, AVMT 1103
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
  • Meets FAR 147 requirements.
  • Must have a “C” grade or better to pass.
Special Topics in Aviation
0-4
CH(s)

Studies in special selected topics, to be determined by the instructor and approved by the School Dean.  Credits earned will be applicable as free electives in associate and certificate of applied science degree programs.

Note:
  • Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 1199 Special Topics designation. 
  • Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course. 
Reciprocating Engines & System
3
CH(s)

This course is a study of the theory of operation of reciprocating engines and their systems. The course emphasizes the principles of operation, nomenclature, construction and system design.

Prerequisite(s):
AVMT 1101, AVMT 1102
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
  • Meets FAR 147 requirements.
  • Must have a “C” grade or better to pass.
Aircraft Sheet Metal Structures
3
CH(s)

This course covers all aspects of sheet metal structures and aircraft welding. A strong emphasis is placed on acquiring hands-on skills.

Prerequisite(s):
AVMT 1102, AVMT 1103
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
  • Meets FAR 147 requirements.
  • Must have a “C” grade or better to pass.
Reciprocating Engine Maintenance & Return to Service
5
CH(s)

This course emphasizes the hands-on maintenance and overhaul of piston engines. Topics include engine removal, replacement, troubleshooting, inspection, engine maintenance and overhaul, system component repair, inspection, and troubleshooting.

Prerequisite(s):
AVMT 1101, AVMT 2201
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
  • Meets FAR 147 requirements.
  • Must have a “C” grade or better to pass.
Aircraft Propeller and Control Systems
3
CH(s)

A detailed study of propellers, their components, operation and maintenance.

Prerequisite(s):
AVMT 1101, AVMT 2201
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
  • Meets FAR 147 requirements.
  • Must have a “C” grade or better to pass.
Turbine Engines & Systems
3
CH(s)

A study of the theory of operation of turbine engines and their systems. This course emphasizes the principles of operation, nomenclature, construction and system design.

Prerequisite(s):
AVMT 1102, AVMT 1103
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
  • Meets FAR 147 requirements.
  • Must have a “C” grade or better to pass.
Aircraft Fluid Power & Landing Gear Systems
3
CH(s)

A detailed study of aircraft hydraulic, pneumatic and landing gear systems. This includes a study of wheels, tires and brakes found in aircraft landing gear systems. The course will cover many aircraft systems from small general aviation aircraft up to and including transport category aircraft.

Prerequisite(s):
AVMT 1103
Note:
  • Instructor approval required if prerequisite not met.
  • nullMeets FAR 147 requirements.
  • Must have a “C” grade or better to pass.
Turbine Engine Maintenance & Inspection
3
CH(s)

This course emphasizes the hands-on maintenance, overhaul, repair, troubleshooting, and inspection of turbine engines and their systems.

Prerequisite(s):
AVMT 1103, AVMT 2205
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
  • Meets FAR 147 requirements.null
  • Must have a “C” grade or better to pass.
Cabin Atmosphere Control Systems
3
CH(s)

This course is a detailed study of aircraft heating, oxygen, air conditioning, and pressurization systems. Large airliner systems will be covered. 

Prerequisite(s):
AVMT 1103, AVMT 1109
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
  • Meets FAR 147 requirements.null
  • Must have a “C” grade or better to pass.
Airframe Inspection & Flight Control Systems
3
CH(s)

A detailed study of aircraft control surfaces, including operation, assembly and rigging. Airframe inspection procedures are also covered.

Prerequisite(s):
AVMT 1105, AVMT 1109
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
  • Meets FAR 147 requirements.
  • Must have a “C” grade or better to pass.
Non-Metallic Structures
3
CH(s)

A study of wood, fabric, composite and plastic aircraft structures; also covered is the finishing of these structures.

Prerequisite(s):
AVMT 1101, AVMT 1103
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
  • Meets FAR 147 requirements.
  • Must have a “C” grade or better to pass.
Aircraft Avionics & Information Systems
3
CH(s)

This course will provide an overview of the communications, navigation, and instrument systems of the aircraft and power plant. Course outcomes will equip aviation maintenance technicians with the necessary knowledge, skills and work practices to positively impact their knowledge in advanced avionics and information systems.

Prerequisite(s):
AVMT 1109
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
  • Meets FAR 147 requirements.
  • Must have a “C” grade or better to pass.
Advanced Independent Study
1-3
CH(s)

This course will provide an opportunity for exceptional students to further their study of the principles and concepts in the aviation field beyond the traditional FAA-approved 15 week curriculum. This course will allow such students to apply their knowledge in a variety of advanced applications both in the traditional classroom setting and in work/job related experiences. The class will be an individualized, arranged course, with learning outcomes determined by the instructor in consultation with the students and permission of the schools director.

Other Info:
PR: Instructor Approval Required, All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of ALL first-year AVMT coursework and Instructor Approval.

FAA Certification Review (Optional)
1-3
CH(s)

The FAA Certification Review is an optional course for students offering a compilation and review of the areas of knowledge required for successful completion of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) written, oral, and practical examinations which culminate in the issuance of an FAA Airframe certification, Power plant certification or a combined Airframe and Power plant certification. The course is designed to accommodate students who have completed FAA approved formal classroom training requirements or have been approved by the FAA based on practical Industry or military experience.

Other Info:
PR: Instructor Approval Required
Special Topics in Aviation
0-4
CH(s)

This course will provide an opportunity for students to further their study of principles and concepts in the field and to apply their knowledge in a variety of application both in the traditional classroom setting and in work/job related experiences. The class will be an individualized, arranged course, with learning outcomes determined by the instructor in consultation with the student and permission of the School Dean.

Note:
  • Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 2299 Special Topics designation. 
  • Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course.

Biology

Biological Principles II
4
CH(s)
S-FSU

This introductory course in cellular biology emphasizes the organization and functions common to all living cells. The major topics to be explored include cell organelle structure and function, the molecular basis of cell energetics, the cell cycle and basic molecular biology of the cell. 3 hours of lecture and one 3-hour laboratory per week.

Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only
Note:

Prerequisite: A score of 21 or better on the ACT Science Reasoning section or SCIE 1000 with a C or better or BIOL 1105 with a C or better.

Technical Microbiology
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

Designed for the Allied Health Programs, this course emphasizes the history of microbiology, microbial morphology and structure; microbial growth and physiology; environmental effects on bacteria; inhibition and killing of bacteria; virulence, pathogenicity, and invasiveness of microbes; modes of disease transmission; resistance and immunity; techniques of isolation; handling, culturing, identifying bacteria and the inhibition of bacteria. Safety, cleanliness, and responsibility are taught in the laboratory. 3 hours of lecture and one two-hour lab per week.

Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only
Note:
  • This course is designed for FSU Allied Health Nursing and Pre-Pharmacy majors Majors, and Pierpont Vet Tech majors.
  • FSU BIOL 2224 will not substitute for Pierpont BIOL 2205 or vice versa.
Biological Principles I
4
CH(s)

This introductory course in population biology explores the organization and function of populations, including reproduction and transmission genetics, patterns and mechanisms of evolutionary change and the fundamental concepts of ecology. 3 hours of lecture and one 3-hour laboratory per week.

Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only
Note:

Prerequisite: A score of 21 or better on the ACT Science Reasoning section; or SCIE 1000 with a C or better; or BIOL 1106 with a C or better.

Respiratory Care

Technical Microbiology Lab
1
CH(s)

This course teaches techniques of isolation; handling, culturing, identifying bacteria and the inhibition of bacterial growth. Safety, cleanliness, and responsibility are taught in the laboratory. One two- hour lab per week.

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:
May not be enrolled in one of the following Levels:
  • Continuing Education 
Must be enrolled in one of the following Majors:      
  • Veterinary Tech 
  • Pre-Pharmacy
Introduction to Respiratory Care
2
CH(s)

This course introduces the respiratory care student to the basic principles and skills required to care for the cardiopulmonary patient with a significant emphasis on respiratory anatomy and physiology, including patient assessment, principles of oxygen administration and basic pulmonary diagnostic procedures.

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

Respiratory Care

The learner will obtain CPR certification during this course.

Clinical Theory Lecture
3
CH(s)

This course emphasizes the clinical application principles and theories used in the delivery of care to the cardiopulmonary patients. The skills acquired will be applied in laboratory practice RESP 2205

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

Respiratory Care

Mechanical Ventilation I Lecture
3
CH(s)

An examination of the theory and application of principles of mechanical ventilation. Emphasis will be place on the effects of positive pressure ventilation, operating modes, airway management, and initiation of mechanical ventilation.

Prerequisite(s):
HLCA 1170, HLCA 1171, CHM 1101
Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

Respiratory Care

Mechanical Ventilation I Lab
1
CH

This is complementary to RESP 1107 Mechanical Ventilation I. This lab focus will be on the practical application of setup and operation of representative mechanical ventilators, the effects of positive pressure ventilation, operating modes, airway management and initiation of mechanical ventilation.

Prerequisite(s):
CHM 1101, HLCA 1170, HLCA 1171
Respiratory Pathophysiology
3
CH(s)

An in-depth study of cardio-pulmonary pathology, injuries, surgery, and associated medical findings. Clinical treatment is integrated into the discussion of each pathology.

Prerequisite(s):
HLCA 1170, HLCA 1171
Special Topics in Respiratory Care
0-4
CH(s)

Studies in special selected topics, to be determined by the instructor and approved by the School Dean.  Credits earned will be applicable as free electives in associate and certificate of applied science degree programs.  Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 1199 Special Topics designation.

Note:

Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course.

Respiratory Care Internship
2
CH(s)

This clinical experience will be the choice of the student. Choices include management, neonatal and pediatrics, adult critical care, diagnostic and monitoring, pulmonary rehabilitation, home and skilled nursing care for the pulmonary patient, and other experiences.

Respiratory Care Pharmacology
3
CH(s)

This course is an in-depth study of the drugs encountered during the clinical practice of respiratory care. The indications, dosages, actions, side effects, and other aspects of medication and medication delivery will be studied. Emphasis will include general chemistry principles.

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

Respiratory Care

Clinical Theory Lab I
2
CH

This is complementary to RESP 1105 Clinical Theory. This lab focuses on the practical application of the basic technical skills used in the delivery of care to cardiopulmonary patients. The practice of clinical skills acquired during this laboratory practice will be applied in a full service respiratory care department under the guidance of a clinical instructor. Lecture and 80 hours clinical rotation. This course is open to Respiratory Therapy students only.

Prerequisite(s):
RESP 1105
Clinical Theory II Lab
2
CH(s)

This course is a continuation of RESP 2205 Clinical Theory I Lab. This is complementary to RESP 1105 Clinical Theory. This lab focuses on the practical application of the basic technical skills used in the delivery of care to cardiopulmonary patients. The practice of clinical skills acquired during this laboratory practice will be applied in a full service respiratory care department under the guidance of a clinical instructor. Lecture and 80 hours clinical rotation. This course is open to Respiratory Therapy students only.

Clinical Practicum I
5
CH(s)

This course provides laboratory practice and clinical application of technical and professional skills utilized in general floor care as well as some critical care procedures. Lecture and 360 hours clinical rotation. This course is open to Respiratory Therapy students only. PR: RESP 2210 with a minimum grade of “C” or better.

Prerequisite(s):
RESP 1101, HLCA 1170, HLCA 1171
Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

Respiratory Care

Mechanical Ventilations II Lecture
3
CH(s)

The course is a continuation of Mechanical Ventilation I. Emphasis will be placed on invasive and non-invasive assessment and monitoring of the mechanically ventilated patient. The learner will begin the practice of advanced therapeutic procedures for complex medical conditions and demonstrate setup and operation of representative mechanical ventilators.

Prerequisite(s):
RESP 1101, HLCA 1170, HLCA 1171
Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

Respiratory Care

Mechanical Ventilation II Lab
1
CH

This is complementary to RESP 2220 Mechanical Ventilation I. This lab focuses on the practical application of invasive and non-invasive assessment and monitoring of the mechanically ventilated patient and the practice of advanced therapeutic procedures for complex medical conditions.

Prerequisite(s):
RESP 1101, HLCA 1170, HLCA 1171
Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

Respiratory Care

Cardiopulmonary Pathologies and Therapeutics
3
CH(s)

This is an advanced course to the profession of respiratory therapy, which covers the underlying pathophysiology of cardiopulmonary diseases. A systems approach will be utilized that will emphasize abnormal physiological processes which result in the signs and symptoms of each cardiopulmonary disorder. There will be an emphasis in diagnosis, selection and implementation of therapeutic modalities and the role of the respiratory therapist in treatment. This course is open to Respiratory Therapy students only.

Neonatal/Pediatric Respiratory Care
3
CH(s)

General Survey of respiratory physiology, diseases, and treatment of the neonatal and pediatric population. Included is a study of the respiratory management of the high risk infant.

Prerequisite(s):
RESP 1101, HLCA 1170, HLCA 1171
Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

Respiratory Care

Neonatal/Pediatric Clinical Practice
2
CH(s)

This course is the clinical practice component of RESP 2230, Neonatal/Pediatric Respiratory Care. This course focuses on the application of respiratory care procedures in the neonatal and pediatric care units, including neonatal and pediatric intensive care units.

Prerequisite(s):
RESP 2230
Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

Respiratory Care

Clinical Practicum II
5
CH(s)

This course provides laboratory practice and clinical application of technical and professional skills used in the intensive care unit, with emphasis on the mechanically ventilated patient. In addition, this course requires a senior project that can be one of the following: original research, in depth disease presentation, in-service at a professional meeting or community service project. This will be shared in the appropriate venue. Lecture and 360 hour clinical rotations. PR: RESP 1101, RESP 1105 and RESP 2200 with a minimum grade of “C” or better in all.

Prerequisite(s):
RESP 2210
Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

Respiratory Care

Respiratory Care Exam Review
2
CH(s)

This course provides practice examinations and review to prepare the student to obtain the CRT and RRT credential.

Prerequisite(s):
RESP 2220, RESP 2221, RESP 2250
Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

Respiratory Care

Intensive Respiratory Care
3
CH(s)

This course will focus on assessment and monitoring techniques used in critical care medicine. The learner will explore advanced cardio-pulmonary monitoring, fluid and electrolyte management, nutritional assessment, and patient outcomes.

Prerequisite(s):
RESP 2220, RESP 2221, RESP 2250
Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

Respiratory Care

Special Topics in Respiratory Care
0-4
CH(s)

This course will provide an opportunity for students to further their study of principles and concepts in the field and to apply their knowledge in a variety of applications both in the traditional classroom setting and in work/job related experiences. 

Note:

The class will be an individualized, arranged course, with learning outcomes determined by the instructor in consultation with the student and permission of the school’s dean.

Respiratory Care Capstone
2
CH(s)

The course incorporates discussion of critical questions and contemporary issues in the current health care environment. The goal is to facilitate successful transition from student to graduate respiratory care professional. The student will demonstrate the value of lifelong learning and provide evidence of adequate preparation for assuming the role of respiratory care professional. 

Prerequisite(s):
RESP 2220, RESP 2221, RESP 2250
Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

Respiratory Care

Capstone course.

Business Information Systems Management

Introduction to Computing
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

This course provides an overview of the current state of computing and its social implications. This is intended to be used as a breadth-first introductory course for majors and non-majors. Topics include organization of a computer system, examination of computing disciplines, social implications of computing, problem solving using productivity software applications, and investigations of emerging areas in information systems.

Business & Industry Technical Studies

Guided Experience I
1-4
CH(s)

This course will be a guided experience for community college students to explore topics of interest in their field through research, field experience, presentation, computer applications, lab experience, or other project agreed upon between the student and the supervising faculty and is submitted to the dean in a written contract.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s), PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:

Credits earned may be applied as free electives in degree or certificate programs.

Guided Experience II
1-4
CH(s)

This course will be an advanced guided experience for community college students to explore topics of interest in their field through research, field experience, presentation, computer applications, lab experience, or other project agreed upon between the student and the supervising faculty and is submitted to the dean in a written contract.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s), PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:

Credits earned may be applied as free electives in degree or certificate programs.

Business Administration

Introduction to Business
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This entry-level course helps the student when choosing a major. The course is a survey of the various fields of business designed to acquaint the student with the basic principles, practices, and employment opportunities of each field.

Business Mathematics
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course is designed to provide knowledge and skill in the computation of the practical problems of business. The course content is an introduction to procedures in the fields of accounting, business finance, marketing, and related business subjects. 

Other Info:
At least one listed Prerequisite/Co-requisite Required
Note:

Prerequisite: Minimum score of 19 on ACT Math section; or successful completion or Math 82 Challenge Exam (70% or greater or completion of Math 82).

Guided Experience I
1-4
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course will be a guided experience for community college students to explore topics of interest in their field through research, field experience, presentation, computer applications, lab experience, or other project agreed upon between the student and the supervising faculty and is submitted to the dean in a written contract.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s), PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:

Credits earned may be applied as free electives in degree or certificate programs.

Business Administration Special Topics in Business
0-4
CH(s)
S-PCTC

Studies in special selected topics, to be determined by the instructor and approved by the School Dean. 

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s)
Note:
  • Credits earned will be applicable as free electives in associate and certificate of applied science degree programs.
  • Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 1199 Special Topics designation. 
  • Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course. 
Small Business Fundamentals
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

An introductory course designed to familiarize students with small business dynamics. Students analyze personal strengths and weaknesses relative to launching an entrepreneurial career. Attention is given to planning, financing, starting, and managing a new business.

Human Relations in Business
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

The goal of this course is to teach skills and procedures and to raise students’ awareness for the many issues involving relationships on the job. Students will be exposed to the most significant human relations issues in today’s workplace and will explore the relationship between effective human relations skills and ongoing career success.

Business Essentials
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

Students must possess many tangible and intangible attributes in order to obtain and maintain successful employment in today’s workforce. Potential candidates must possess not only the technical skills essential to that particular employment field, but must also possess the “soft skills” that employers seek. This course incorporates four “soft skills” that are essential to employability--Professional Image, Professional Etiquette, Professional Documents, and Business Ethics. Professional Image incorporates overall presence, appearance, and dress. Professional Etiquette includes customer relations, diplomacy, interacting with people, dining, and gift giving. Professional Documents addresses the all-important topics of business English/grammar, editing, and proofreading. Business Ethics approaches ethical decisions of the employee as well as the organization. This course provides useful and timely topics for job-seeking students in all programs of study.

Prerequisite(s):
BUSN 2251
Other Info:
At least one listed Prerequisite/Co-requisite Required
Corporate Communications
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course focuses on the foundations of communication in the business world. The content includes verbal and nonverbal communication skills; interpersonal communication; business English/grammar, editing and proofreading; effective business document composition, including letters, memos, and email messages; business report preparation; and business presentations.

Prerequisite(s):
ENGL 1104
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

This course is writing intensive.

Guided Experience II
1-4
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course will be an advanced guided experience for community college students to explore topics of interest in their field through research, field experience, presentation, computer applications, lab experience, or other project agreed upon between the student and the supervising faculty and is submitted to the dean in a written contract.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s), PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:

Credits earned may be applied as free electives in degree or certificate programs.

Special Topics in Business Administration
0-4
CH(s)

This course will provide an opportunity for students to further their study of principles and concepts in the field and to apply their knowledge in a variety of application both in the traditional classroom setting and in work/job related experiences. The class will be an individualized, arranged course, with learning outcomes determined by the instructor in consultation with the student and permission of the School Dean.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s)
Note:
  • Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 1199 Special Topics designation. 
  • Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course. 
Legal Aspects of Business
3
CH(s)

This course emphasizes business and consumer applications within the framework of federal, state, and local laws, and discusses the impact of globalization. Students will examine the differences between civil and criminal law, and the emerging influence of technology and the Internet. The relationship of law and ethics, due process, contract law, court systems, and methods of dispute resolution will also be covered. Analysis of relevant cases and current issues in the law will be incorporated.

Integrated Business Strategies
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

Integrated Business Strategies is an experiential, integrated business simulation. The course provides students with a capstone experience of cross-disciplinary business knowledge and skills essential to succeed in today’s global economy. It also provides a cornerstone for further experience and education in the business field. In a simulated environment, students work in teams to manage and coordinate corporate strategies across all functional areas of a company: research and development, marketing, production, finance, human resources, and total quality management. Individual student success is measured throughout the simulation to determine the student’s level of business judgment and analytical skills.

Other Info:
PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:

Capstone course.

Chemistry

General Chemistry II
4
CH(s)
S-FSU

This course is an extension of CHEM 1101. It covers acid base theory, chemical equilibrium, oxidation-reduction and an introduction to organic chemistry which includes the various classes of organic compounds, their nomenclature, structure, properties and reactions. The synthesis of polymers and their uses are included. The course consists of 3 hours of lecture and one 3-hour laboratory per week.

Prerequisite(s):
CHM 1101
Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only, All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Chemical Principles I
5
CH(s)
S-FSU

This course and the following one, CHEM 1106, constitute an introduction to modern chemistry and its applications to society, including structure, nomenclature, properties and simple reactivity of inorganic and organic chemicals, descriptive chemistry, periodic properties, spectroscopy, stoichiometry involving solids, gases and solutions, basic thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium (acid/base and solubility), introductory kinetics, biochemistry, electrochemistry and nuclear chemistry. 4 hours of lecture and one 3-hour laboratory per week.

Prerequisite(s):
CHM 1101
Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only, At least one listed Prerequisite/Co-requisite Required
Note:
  • CHEM 1101 with a grade of C or better, OR
  • ACT math score of 20; or SAT Math 480; or Compass score of 42
Foundational Biochemistry
4
CH(s)
S-FSU

An introduction to biochemistry with emphasis on the role of basic general chemistry principles, including molecular structure and intermolecular forces, periodic properties, acid-base chemistry, diffusion and osmosis, kinetics and energetics, structural models and visualization. Introduces biochemical reaction mechanisms, cell components and their functions, and a chemical view of proteins, lipids, and cell membranes.  3 hours of lecture and one 3-hour laboratory per week.

Prerequisite(s):
CHEM 1105
Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only, All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

CHEM 1105 and CHEM 2200 satisfy the first-year chemistry requirements for FSU science majors and students pursuing pre-professional studies (e.g., pre-medical, pre-dental, pre-pharmacy, etc.).

General Chemistry I
4
CH(s)

A study of the theoretical concepts needed to understand typical chemical phenomena. The course addresses the nature of science, matter and measurements, the stoichiometry of chemical reactions, solutions and the calculation of concentration, energy relationships in chemistry, modern atomic theory, chemical bonding and molecular structure and the classification of reactions. 3 lectures and one 3-hour laboratory per week.

Other Info:
At least one listed Prerequisite/Co-requisite Required
Note:

Prerequisites: ACT math score of 19; or SAT Math score of 460; or Compass score of 36; or MATH 0080 Series.

Communication

Mass Communication
3
CH(s)

This course is a survey of the mass communication industry and its role in today’s society. Students will discuss historical developments and current responsibilities of those working in the various areas of mass communication. Special emphasis will be given to the ever-changing nature of mass communication, including the computer and Internet as new tools.

Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only
Introduction to Communication
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

Examines the theoretical foundations of human communication through definitional analysis and examination of communication models, code elements and ethical considerations pertinent to communication in our society. This course provides the opportunity for each student to participate in interpersonal and public speaking presentations to develop his/her skills in interacting with others in both the personal and professional arenas.

Prerequisite(s):
ENGL 1104
Other Info:
At least one listed Prerequisite/Co-requisite Required
Note:
  • This course satisfies the General Studies oral communication requirement.
  • Prerequisite: Completion of ENG 1104 with a “C” or better grade; or a Verbal ACT score of 21 or higher.
  • (Previously SPCH 1100)
Introduction to Group Discussion
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

This course focuses on the theories, concepts and skills necessary to function effectively in a variety of group settings. Students will use research, organization, critical thinking and presentational skills when participating in groups to investigate social problems and create potential solutions for those problems. Topics include group norms, rules, roles, conflict management, leadership, problem solving, decision-making and team building.

Prerequisite(s):
ENGL 1104
Other Info:
At least one listed Prerequisite/Co-requisite Required
Note:
  • This course satisfies the General Studies oral communication requirement.
  • Prerequisite: Completion of ENG 1104 with a “C” or better grade; or a Verbal ACT score of 21 or higher
Introduction to Communication in the World of Work
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

This course focuses on personal and professional communication. It examines the nature of communication in the world of work. Students will exam and practice individual, group and presentational communication skills necessary to work effectively with peers, supervisors, supervisees and constituents. Topics addressed will include interpersonal communication, socialization, organizational culture, group dynamics, leadership, power and status, meeting facilitation, problem solving, presentation research, organization and delivery.

Prerequisite(s):
ENGL 1104
Other Info:
At least one listed Prerequisite/Co-requisite Required
Note:
  • This course satisfies the General Studies oral communication requirement.
  • Prerequisite: Completion of ENG 1104 with a “C” or better grade; or a Verbal ACT score of 21 or higher
Introduction to Human Communication
3
CH(s)

Computer Science

Introduction to Computing
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

This course provides an overview of the current state of computing and its social implications. This is intended to be used as a breadth-first introductory course for majors and non-majors. Topics include organization of a computer system, discussion of a broad range of software systems, problem solving, database systems, networking, computer security, ethical issues, and emerging areas in computer science.

Applied Technical Programming
3
CH(s)

This course provides familiarity with hardware and software concepts and an introduction to the Visual BASIC programming language. Several short programming projects are assigned to provide the students with experience in program development.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1201
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

This course may not be substituted for either COMP 1100 or 1102.

Criminal Justice

Introduction to Criminal Justice
3
CH(s)

This course introduces the student to the three principal components of the criminal justice system: law enforcement, the judiciary and corrections. It will examine the history, structure, functions and issues of each component, and introduce the student to the measurement of crime, criminological theories, criminal law, justice perspectives and the juvenile justice system.

Police Operations
3
CH(s)

The student will be introduced to the day-to-day duties of a police officer. Emphasis will be placed on community and human relations, patrol and traffic functions, order maintenance, report writing, investigations, communications, interviewing, search and seizure and arrest. Police stress and survival skills will also be discussed.

Guided Experience I
1-4
CH(s)

This course will be a guided experience for community college students to explore topics of interest in their field through research, field experience, presentation, computer applications, lab experience, or other project agreed upon between the student and the supervising faculty and is submitted to the dean in a written contract.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s), PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:

Credits earned may be applied as free electives in degree or certificate programs.

Special Topics in Criminal Justice
0-4
CH(s)

Studies in special selected topics, to be determined by the instructor and approved by the School Dean.  Credits earned will be applicable as free electives in associate and certificate of applied science degree programs.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s)
Note:
  • Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 1199 Special Topics designation. 
  • Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course. 
Principles of Criminal Law
3
CH(s)

Structure, definitions and interpretations of criminal statutes of particular interest. The course will cover the scope, purpose and definition of criminal law in general, including the study of crimes against individuals and property and other offenses.

Computer Crime: Legal Issues & Investigation Procedures
3
CH(s)

This course provides an overview of computer crime and procedures which forensic computing specialists, law enforcement investigators and prosecutors must invoke to successfully prosecute computer criminals.

Natural Resource Laws
3
CH(s)

This course involves a study of the state Natural Resources Laws dealing with the objectives of the Department of Natural Resources, the meaning of these various laws and regulations and the authority granted officers in their enforcement.

Prerequisite(s):
CRJU 1100
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Introduction to Corrections
3
CH(s)

A survey of the current correctional process in America, including the origin and legal procedures of the present system and its effects on the individuals as well as on our society. Special emphasis is given to current theories of rehabilitation in the institution and in probation and parole. Students will also be introduced to the administration of the adult and juvenile institutions and the alternatives to and future of the present system.

Firearms
3
CH(s)

This course addresses safety precautions, legal provisions, moral aspects, principles of decision shooting and restrictions in the use of firearms. Nomenclature and the firing process of the sidearm and shotgun will be demonstrated.

Prerequisite(s):
CRJU 1100
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Deviant Behavior
3
CH(s)

A study of the recognition and handling of abnormal persons with emphasis on those mental conditions most often encountered by the criminal justice practitioner. Methods of crisis intervention, basic conflict management and referral and diversion will also be discussed.

Introduction to Private Security
3
CH(s)

This course will analyze the evolution, philosophy, responsibilities and functions of the private security industry. It will include risk management, occupational safety and health, public relations and loss prevention measures. The student will examine similarities and differences between private security and public policing.

Prerequisite(s):
CRJU 1100
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Police Administration
3
CH(s)

A survey of public police administration, this course covers political influences and controls, principles of leadership, interpersonal and organizational communication, human resource management, labor relations, information systems and applications, planning and decision making, financial management, measurement of productivity and organizational change.

Prerequisite(s):
CRJU 1101
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Juvenile Justice Process
3
CH(s)

This course addresses definitions of delinquent behavior, contributing social problems, adolescence as a subculture, the philosophy and practice of adjudication process for juveniles and treatment procedures.

Crime Scene Investigation
3
CH(s)

This course will examine all aspects of performing a thorough and methodical crime scene investigation. This course will address a variety of crime scene ranging from crimes of violence to property crime scenes. Various types of physical evidence such as latent prints, trace evidence, biological fluids will be examined. The methods and procedures utilized for the collection of evidence will be demonstrated and examined.

Prerequisite(s):
CRJU 1100
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Criminal Investigation
3
CH(s)

This course will survey the fundamental techniques of criminal investigation. Students will be exposed to the history of criminal investigation and criminalistics, interviewing and interrogation, physical evidence, crime scene procedures, crime analysis, investigation techniques, report writing, case preparation and courtroom testimony.

Prerequisite(s):
CRJU 1100
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Adjudication Process
3
CH(s)

Topics include the role and structure of prosecution, public defense, and the courts; basic elements of the substantive criminal law and procedural law and its relation to constitutional guarantees.

Prerequisite(s):
CRJU 1100
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Criminal Evidence
3
CH(s)

This course covers constitutional and procedural considerations affecting arrest, search and seizure, post-conviction treatment; the origin, development, philosophy and constitutional basis of evidence; kinds and degrees of evidence and rules governing admissibility; and judicial decisions interpreting individual rights and case studies. The primary focus is on the case study approach.

Prerequisite(s):
CRJU 1100
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Law of Corrections
3
CH(s)

This course is designed to introduce the student to the concepts of law related to the rights of the accused and convicted in the corrections environment, both pre-conviction and post-conviction. Topics include the constitutional rights of pretrial detainees and prisoners, remedies available for the violation of such rights, potential liability (civil and criminal) of corrections officials for violation of such rights and some practical applications of such principles. The course will utilize the case study method in combination with lectures and readings to achieve the stated goals.

Prerequisite(s):
CRJU 2206
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Homicide Investigation
3
CH(s)

This course will examine all aspects of performing a thorough and methodical death investigation. The course will address the initial arrival, securing the scene, forensic evidence, follow-up, causes and motives. Suicides, accidental deaths, natural causes, homicide, serial and mass murder will also be examined. Students will learn about the importance of latent prints, blood spatters, rigor mortis, liver mortis, entomology, bite marks, interrogations and current software to aid in an investigation.

Prerequisite(s):
CRJU 2236
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Risk Management
3
CH(s)

This course is designed to assist the student in obtaining an advanced understanding of risk management. The process of risk management is utilized in determining your assets, vulnerabilities, and threats and then protecting them.

Prerequisite(s):
CRJU 1100
Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
  • Required core class for the Homeland Security Degree Program.
  • Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the A.A.S. Homeland Security Degree Program or Pre-Homeland Security Program.
Terrorism, Counter Terrorism and Terrorism Response
3
CH(s)

This course is designed to provide the beginning student with a basic understanding of the history of terrorism, its impact on society, the domestic and foreign evolution of terrorism, various terrorist groups around the world, and the appeal of terrorism to fringe and un-empowered groups. The course will also examine the law enforcement responses to terrorism.

Prerequisite(s):
CRJU 1100, CRJU 1101
Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
  • Required core class for the Criminal Justice Track of the Homeland Security AAS Degree Program.
  • Prerequisite: Must be admitted to the A.A.S. Homeland Security Degree Program or Pre-Homeland Security Program.
Sex Crimes
3
CH(s)

This course will examine all aspects of performing a thorough sex crime investigation. The course will also examine sexual behavior, theories of sexual deviance, nuisance sex behavior, incest, pedophilia and dangerous sex practices. The student will be further exposed to investigative issue such as: bite marks, latent prints, interrogation, and profiling.

Prerequisite(s):
CRJU 1100, CRJU 2236
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Guided Experience II
1-4
CH(s)

This course will be an advanced guided experience for community college students to explore topics of interest in their field through research, field experience, presentation, computer applications, lab experience, or other project agreed upon between the student and the supervising faculty and is submitted to the dean in a written contract.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s), PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:

Credits earned may be applied as free electives in degree or certificate programs.

Ethics in Criminal Justice
3
CH(s)

This course introduces the student to ethical decision making. The student will analyze the major ethical perspectives and then incorporate them into the social and criminal justice context as it relates to law, police, courts, and corrections. The course also addresses the future development of ethics in everyday life.

Special Topics in Criminal Justice
0-4
CH(s)

This course will provide an opportunity for students to further their study of principles and concepts in the field and to apply their knowledge in a variety of application both in the traditional classroom setting and in work/job related experiences. The class will be an individualized, arranged course, with learning outcomes determined by the instructor in consultation with the student and permission of the School Dean.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s)
Note:
  • Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 2299 Special Topics designation. 
  • Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course. 

Dance

Introduction to Social Ballroom Dancing
2
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course will introduce students to the study of basic figures of the American Style of waltz, foxtrot, swing, tango, cha cha, and mambo in accordance with the DVIDA bronze level syllabus. Students will also be introduced to the character of each dance, as well as how to recognize the music. This course will enable the student to participate in social occasions requiring ballroom dancing skills, such as weddings and formal social and business parties, as well as informal occasions.

Ballroom Dancing Culture & Repertoire
1
CH(s)

This course will introduce students to the history, etiquette, and rhythm of ballroom dancing. Course content will include how each dance has evolved through history and cultural influence. Students will learn how to display proper etiquette in dance, and become aware of this influence personal lifestyle. The study of music and its rhythm as it applies to each dance style will also be a focus.

Note:

Lecture.

Physical Conditioning for Ballroom Dance
1
CH(s)

This course is designed to introduce students to the good health needs required of professional dancers. Students will be introduced to a variety of activities including proper eating habits, exercise, muscle building, and flexibility programs intended for healthy living. In addition, students will study how to assist future students as dance instructors in these activities. 

Note:

Lecture.

Ballroom Fun Dancing
1
CH(s)

In this eight-week course, students will explore the more “relaxed” dances of ballroom dancing. These dances may include club dances such as salsa, meringue, hustle, and the west coast swing. They will also study the character of each dance, as well as how to recognize the music. This course will enable students to dance through entire songs at parties and weddings.

Note:
  • Can be used as a free elective.
  • Open to all students.
Guided Experience I
1-4
CH(s)

This course will be a guided experience for community college students to explore topics of interest in their field through research, field experience, presentation, computer applications, lab experience, or other project agreed upon between the student and the supervising faculty and is submitted to the dean in a written contract.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s), PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:

Credits earned may be applied as free electives in degree or certificate programs.

Special Topics in Ballroom Dance
0-4
CH(s)

Studies in special selected topics, to be determined by the instructor and approved by the School Dean.  Credits earned will be applicable as free electives in associate and certificate of applied science degree programs. 

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s)
Note:
  • Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 1199 Special Topics designation. 
  • Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course. 
Ballroom Dancing Instruction Practicum
1
CH(s)

This course will enable the student to learn and practice ballroom dancing teaching skills at the college, schools and other venues such as youth and community groups. Must be taken during three separate semesters at two or three different venues.

Prerequisite(s):
DANC 1100
Note:
  • Can be used as a free elective.
  • Open to all students.
Bronze Waltz/Rumba
2
CH(s)

In this course, students will complete the fifteen (15) figures that compose the DVIDA Bronze syllabus in the American style of waltz and rumba plus variations. Students will polish technique and should feel comfortable dancing with partners of multiple levels in these two dances at the end of the course. In addition, this course will provide an opportunity for students to test and receive the DVIDA Bronze certification for American style waltz and rumba at the end of the semester.

Prerequisite(s):
DANC 1100
Bronze Foxtrot/Swing
2
CH(s)

In this course, students will complete the fifteen (15) figures that compose the DVIDA Bronze syllabus in the American style of foxtrot and east coast swing plus variations. Students will polish technique and should feel comfortable dancing with partners of multiple levels in these two dances at the end of the course. In addition, this course will provide an opportunity for students to test and receive the DVIDA Bronze certification for American style foxtrot and east coast swing at the end of the semester.

Prerequisite(s):
DANC 1100
Bronze Tango/Cha Cha
2
CH(s)

In this course, students will complete the fifteen (15) figures that compose the DVIDA Bronze syllabus in the American style of tango and cha cha plus variations. Students will polish technique and should feel comfortable dancing with partners of multiple levels in these two dances at the end of the course. In addition, this course will provide an opportunity for students to test and receive the DVIDA Bronze certification for American style tango and cha cha at the end of the semester.

Prerequisite(s):
DANC 1100
Bronze Viennese/Bolero/Mambo
2
CH(s)

In this course, students will complete the ten (10) figures that compose the DVIDA Bronze syllabus in the American style of Viennese waltz and bolero and the fifteen (15) figures that compose the DVIDA Bronze syllabus in the American style of mambo plus variations. Students will polish technique and should feel comfortable dancing with partners of multiple levels in these three dances at the end of the course. In addition, this course will provide an opportunity for students to test and receive the DVIDA Bronze certification for American style Viennese waltz, bolero, and mambo at the end of the semester.

Prerequisite(s):
DANC 1100
Best Practices in Studio Management
2
CH(s)

The emphasis of this course is on identifying and responding to appropriate business, ethical, promotional, and creative challenges that happen when managing/owning a performing arts studio. Topics include (but not limited to) studio site selection, curriculum development, client services, creative marketing/promotion, staff development, and industry outlets for advancement. Students are expected to analyze examples via news articles and multi-media, discussing ethical issues, developing appropriate courses of action. Course assessments will include individual research and reporting on current trends and creating a mock studio profile.

Guided Experience II
1-4
CH(s)

This course will be an advanced guided experience for community college students to explore topics of interest in their field through research, field experience, presentation, computer applications, lab experience, or other project agreed upon between the student and the supervising faculty and is submitted to the dean in a written contract.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s), PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:

Credits earned may be applied as free electives in degree or certificate programs.

Special Topics in Ballroom Dance
0-4
CH(s)

This course will provide an opportunity for students to further their study of principles and concepts in the field and to apply their knowledge in a variety of application both in the traditional classroom setting and in work/job related experiences. The class will be an individualized, arranged course, with learning outcomes determined by the instructor in consultation with the student and permission of the School Dean.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s)
Note:
  • Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 1199 Special Topics designation. 
  • Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course. 

Drafting

Engineering Graphics
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This introductory course covers basic drawing processes and techniques, including freehand lettering, geometric construction, sketching, multi-view and pictorial drawing, dimensioning and sheet layout. Tools, drawing surfaces, computer graphics, and projection theory will be stressed throughout the course.

Guided Experience I
1-4
CH(s)

This course will be a guided experience for community college students to explore topics of interest in their field through research, field experience, presentation, computer applications, lab experience, or other project agreed upon between the student and the supervising faculty and is submitted to the dean in a written contract.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s), PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:

Credits earned may be applied as free electives in degree or certificate programs.

Special Topics in Drafting
0-4
CH(s)

Studies in special selected topics, to be determined by the instructor and approved by the School Dean.  Credits earned will be applicable as free electives in associate and certificate of applied science degree programs. 

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s)
Note:
  • Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 1199 Special Topics designation. 
  • Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course. 
Print Reading
1
CH(s)

This course covers the interpretation of intermediate blueprints. Topics include tolerancing, auxiliary views, sectional views, and assembly drawings. Upon completion, students should be able to read and interpret a mechanical working drawing.  

Fundamentals of AutoCAD
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This is an introductory Computer Aided Drafting (CAD) course. Software to be covered will be Windows and the use of AutoCAD. The student will learn on a PC workstation and become familiar with plotters and printers.

Introduction to Solid Modeling
3
CH(s)

An introduction to conveying information as to the shape, size, and formation of a three-dimensional object. Topics include technical sketches, drawings and illustrations for parts catalogues. Content areas include isometrics, perspectives, three-dimensional wire frames and solid models. Three-dimensional rendering will also be explored.

Prerequisite(s):
DRFT 2200
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Architectural Drafting
3
CH(s)

A comprehensive study of the planning, design and drawing of a single-family residence. Primary considerations include the site, styling, codes, zones and basic construction techniques. Modern house planning results in a complete set of plans and specifications.

Prerequisite(s):
DRFT 2200
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Inventor Sheet Metal and Fabrication
3
CH(s)

The course emphasizes the use if Inventor software in sheet metal design and fabrication. Students will examine the characteristics of various ferrous and non-ferrous metals and the creation of solid models and flat patterns from these metals.

Technical Drafting
3
CH(s)

This course covers advanced drafting and design techniques by using a computer graphics workstation. The course content will include industrial detail drawing, electrical/ electronic drawing, topographic mapping, pipeline drawing and production/working drawings.

Prerequisite(s):
DRFT 2200
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Architectural Design
3
CH(s)

As approach to the development of residential design problems. Sketching, interior perspective and rendered perspective will be covered to prepare interior design majors. Content covers: architectural, pictorial and presentation drawings.

Prerequisite(s):
DRFT 2200
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Mapping
3
CH(s)

This course is an introduction to computer-aided/drafting software for civil, surveying and land development disciplines. Topics include mapping scales and symbols, civil and surveying fundamentals, location and direction of line plan, profile, and cross section drawings, topographic mapping, boundary and legal description plats.

3D Printing: Additive Manufacturing
3
CH(s)
Guided Experience II
1-4
CH(s)

This course will be an advanced guided experience for community college students to explore topics of interest in their field through research, field experience, presentation, computer applications, lab experience, or other project agreed upon between the student and the supervising faculty and is submitted to the dean in a written contract.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s), PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:

Credits earned may be applied as free electives in degree or certificate programs.

Special Topics in Drafting
0-4
CH(s)

This course will provide an opportunity for students to further their study of principles and concepts in the field and to apply their knowledge in a variety of application both in the traditional classroom setting and in work/job related experiences. The class will be an individualized, arranged course, with learning outcomes determined by the instructor in consultation with the student and permission of the School Dean.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s)
Note:
  • Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 1199 Special Topics designation. 
  • Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course. 
Design/Drafting Capstone Course
3
CH(s)

This course is designed as the capstone for the Drafting/Design/CAD Engineering Technology program. Students will complete assignments and projects based on the culmination of skills and knowledge gained in the completed DDET courses. Students will develop a portfolio, resume and job search skills. Internships and practicum hours are encouraged. Students will be required to take the ATMAE Engineering Graphics program assessment exam.

Other Info:
PR: Instructor Approval Required
Technical Elective (3 hr course 1 hr Lab)
3
CH(s)

Early Childhood

Development of Young Children
3
CH(s)

The student will study the physical, social, emotional, and cognitive development of young children with the focus on the preschool period from ages three through five. The course emphasis will be on applying the theories and research of child development to practices and procedures used when working with young children in an early childhood program. 

Prerequisite(s):
EC 1130
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

Prerequisite:  EC 1130 with a grade of C or better; or instructor permission.

Health and Safety in Early Childhood Programs
3
CH(s)

This course provides an introduction to health and safety requirements and responsibilities for individuals working in early childhood programs. Health, nutrition, and safety policies, procedures, and practices are studied. Students will meet state health and safety licensing requirements for child care employees.

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
  • Early Childhood Majors only.
  • Prerequisite: A current Pediatric First Aid and CPR card is required for this course.
  • Students may take EMMS 1113 to satisfy this requirement.
Early Childhood Curriculum
3
CH(s)

The student studies how to plan, prepare and implement developmentally appropriate curriculum for early childhood programs. Opportunities for hands-on learning experiences are provided. Practicum experience is required. Students must register for a laboratory session.

Prerequisite(s):
EC 1106, EC 1130
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

Prerequisites must be completed with a grade of C or better.

Foundations of Early Childhood
3
CH(s)

Students become familiar with various types of early childhood programs and the career opportunities they provide. The history of early childhood is introduced as well as current trends and quality program criteria. Concepts for providing developmentally appropriate practices are introduced.

Guided Experience I
1-4
CH(s)

This course will be a guided experience for community college students to explore topics of interest in their field through research, field experience, presentation, computer applications, lab experience, or other project agreed upon between the student and the supervising faculty and is submitted to the dean in a written contract.

Prerequisite(s):
EC 1130
Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s), PR: Instructor Approval Required, All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

Prerequisites must be completed with a grade of C or better.

Special Topics in Early Childhood
0-4
CH(s)

Studies in special selected topics, to be determined by the instructor and approved by the School Dean.  Credits earned will be applicable as free electives in associate and certificate of applied science degree programs. 

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s)
Note:
  • Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 1199 Special Topics designation. 
  • Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course. 
The Child in the Family
3
CH(s)

This course examines relationships between the young child and other members of the family unit and the relationship between the family and the early childhood program. The focus is on the child during infancy, toddler and preschool years. Studies include the diversity of family lifestyles and cultures.

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

Early Childhood Majors only.

Emergent Literacy in Early Childhood Education
3
CH(s)

This course aims to promote an understanding of all aspects of literacy including speaking, listening, reading and writing through the early childhood years. Topics discussed include theory, methods, cultural and linguistic difference and integrating play.  Language and literacy performance assessments adaptations for special needs children are explored. 

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
  • 15 hours field experience is required.
  • Admission to Early Childhood AAS; Occupational Development, EC Practitioner AAS Degree; or instructor permission for non EC majors.
Early Childhood Inclusion and Special Education
3
CH(s)

This course prepares students with practical strategies for working in early childhood settings serving children with disabilities, including infants, toddlers, preschoolers, and kindergarteners.  An emphasis is placed on relevant curriculum design and instruction that will be used in collaboration with families and other education professionals who teach children with varying capacities and needs in a variety of instructional environments.  Meets WV Board of Education requirements for Permanent Authorization as a Pre-K and Kindergarten Teacher Assistant.

Note:

Instructor permission required for non-majors.

Classroom Strategies
3
CH(s)

Students study theories of early childhood education with emphasis on classroom management, teaching methods, assessment and behavior guidance. Students demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of theories and best practices by preparing appropriate thematic units and lesson plans for preschool children.

Prerequisite(s):
EC 1106, EC 1130
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

Prerequisites must be completed with a grade of "C" or better.

Administration of Early Childhood Programs
3
CH(s)

This course allows students to study early childhood programs from the perspective of the person serving in the role of leader and administrator. Studies include the planning and development of a program or center, budgeting issues, environmental planning and preparation, state licensing regulations, health and safety guidelines, staffing and personnel issues and parent-school relationships. 

Prerequisite(s):
EC 1130
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

Prerequisites must be completed with a grade of "C" or better; or with instructor approval.

Early Childhood Practicum I
3
CH(s)

The student will gain practical experience interacting with young children as a practicum student in a community early childhood program and in the campus Laboratory Preschool.

Prerequisite(s):
EC 1107, EC 2230
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

Prerequisites must be completed with a grade of "C" or better.

Early Childhood Observation and Assessment
3
CH(s)
This course examines the skills and methods used to observe and assess young children in various early childhood environments.  An emphasis will be placed on authentic assessment practices, including the appropriate use of assessment and observation strategies used to document the development, play, and learning of young children. Ten hours of outside classroom observation is required.
Infant Toddler Development and Care
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

The physical, social, emotional, cognitive and language development of the child from conception to age three will be studied. The course will include developmentally appropriate practices to use when caring for infants and toddlers in a group setting as well as in a private home.

Cognitive Development
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

Students study theory and research relevant to the cognitive development of children during early childhood. Emphasis is placed on applying theory and research to behavior guidance and curriculum planning.

Prerequisite(s):
EC 1107
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
  • Prerequisites must be completed with grade of "C" or better.
  • Competency in general math skills required.
Guided Experience II
1-4
CH(s)

This course will be an advanced guided experience for community college students to explore topics of interest in their field through research, field experience, presentation, computer applications, lab experience, or other project agreed upon between the student and the supervising faculty and is submitted to the dean in a written contract.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s), PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:

Credits earned may be applied as free electives in degree or certificate programs.

Special Topics in Early Childhood
0-4
CH(s)

This course will provide an opportunity for students to further their study of principles and concepts in the field and to apply their knowledge in a variety of application both in the traditional classroom setting and in work/job related experiences. The class will be an individualized, arranged course, with learning outcomes determined by the instructor in consultation with the student and permission of the School Dean.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s)
Note:
  • Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 1199 Special Topics designation. 
  • Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course. 
Early Childhood Practicum II
4
CH(s)

Students will utilize the knowledge and skills from all theory and practicum courses as they participate in an early childhood program. Lesson planning, preparation and presentation will be required as the student gains actual teaching experience.

Prerequisite(s):
EC 2232
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
  • Prerequisites must be completed with a grade of "C" or better.
  • Capstone Course.

Economics

Economics
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

Economics 2200 is a General Studies course for nonbusiness majors, which provides the student with a broad macroeconomic theory and international economics, and should develop adequate knowledge to understand the role of economic systems and the application of economic principles in modern society.

Economic Principles and Problems I (Macro)
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

This course approaches the subject from the point of view of macroeconomics, studying the nature and method of economics and describing how the capitalist system functions. Further study is made of the business cycle, fiscal policy, monetary policy, gross national product, and similar concepts. Some time is devoted to the study of competing economic systems.

Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only
Economic Principles and Problems II
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

This course is devoted to microeconomics. It follows the analysis of the firm and the decisions made by the managers of the firm, and includes the analysis of demand and supply and price and output determination. It is also concerned with the important problems in the field of economics: monopoly, agriculture, international trade, labor, economic development and similar issues.

Prerequisite(s):
ECON 2201
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required

Education

Basic Skills for Instruction Support
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course will cover learning strategies and study skills for the paraprofessional, including strategies for remembering information, reading and taking notes, interpreting graphic aids, improving time management, preparing for and taking tests and finding and using information. In addition, math strategies and learning problems in mathematics, plus reading skills, phonics, sight words, and reading comprehension will be covered.

Introduction to Education
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

This course provides the teacher candidate with an overview of the profession. Its primary purpose is to offer information necessary for an informed career decision and a professional commitment to teaching. It also includes an analysis of the historical, philosophical and sociological basis for programs, instructional strategies and teaching behaviors in American education.

Instructional Support Strategies
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course will cover legislation affecting special education laws and the learning experience, the difference between mainstreaming and inclusion, the IEP and the self-contained classroom for the paraprofessional. Students will also learn about implementation of effective classroom management. Behavioral support in a positive learning environment and the role of the family, for encouraging and including parental input in an educational plan, will be included.

Early Childhood Inclusion & Special Education
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

This course is a guided survey of the areas of exceptionality in the field of Special Education (emotionally, behaviorally disturbed, hearing impaired, mentally impaired, gifted, and learning disabled), and the historical, philosophical, political and sociological foundations related to exceptional children.  The laboratory component of the course is designed to provide experience in the areas of exceptionality through observation and limited participation in these areas.

Behavior Support Strategies
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course presents basic principles and practices in the use of applied behavior management with both normal and exceptional learners for the paraprofessional. Students will gain firsthand experience in using behavior analysis and other behavioral support strategies in field settings.

Note:

Capstone Course.

Emergency Medical Services

Introduction to EMS
2
CH(s)

This course is designed to acquaint the student with emergency medical services roles & responsibilities, well being of the EMS provider, illness and injury prevention, medical legal issues, ethics, therapeutic communications, and life span development.

Emergency Medical Technician-Basic
7
CH(s)

This course provides didactic and practical application in basic life support aspects of pre-hospital care and is based upon the U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Standard Curriculum for Emergency Medical Technician - Basics. This course prepares students for the National Registry of EMT’s certification examination. There will be six lecture hours and two lab hours each week.

Emergency Medical Services-Operation
2
CH(s)

This course will include in-depth review of such topics as emergency vehicle operations, medical incident command, rescue awareness and operations, hazardous materials recognition and crime scene awareness.

Emergency Medical Services-Practicum I
2
CH(s)

This course provides the student with the opportunity to observe and apply the skills learned in EMS 103 in a supervised clinical setting including a local hospital emergency department, regional medical command center and on a field EMS unit.

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:
  • EMS Majors Only.
  • A minimum of fifty hours is required and will be scheduled by the student on an individual basis through the EMS Coordinator.
Basic Trauma Life Support
1
CH(s)

This two day course is designed to teach EMT’s First Responders and other health care professionals to rapidly assess, resuscitate, package, and transport patients with traumatic injuries. Simulated traumatic injuries in situations and scenarios will be used to evaluate the students’ practical skills.

Note:

Participants who choose to be certified will be required to pay the necessary certification fees required by State or National certifying agencies.

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and Workplace Safety
1
CH(s)

In this course students will learn adult and pediatric basic like support skills CPR and study the numerous health and safety issues associated with health care facilities. The topics include but are not limited to: OSHA standards, emergency preparedness, fire safety, electrical safety, compressed gas safety, tuberculosis/respiratory protection, blood borne pathogens and biological hazards, potential chemical and drug exposures, ergonomic hazards from lifting and repetitive tasks and how to safely handle these potential hazards.

Note:

This course may be repeated for re-certification purposes.

Introduction to Advanced Life Support Skills Lab
3
CH(s)

This course introduces the student to the opportunity to develop the psychomotor skills of the paramedic. The Advanced Life Support (ALS) skills are integrated into the curriculum in such a way as to present skills in a sequential, building fashion. Initially, the skills are typically taught in isolation, and then integrated into simulated patient care situations. The ALS Skills are set forth by the U.S. Department of Transportation National Safety Administration EMT Paramedic Curriculum.

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

EMS Majors Only.

Home Land Security Practicum I
1
CH(s)

This course provides the student with the opportunity to observe and apply the skills learned in the homeland security core courses. The locations visited will include hospital emergency departments and triage areas, 911 centers, regional medical command center and field EMS unit rotations.

Note:

A minimum of twenty-four hours is required and will be scheduled by the student on an individual basis through the EMS Coordinator.

Emergency Response to Terrorism: Basic Concepts
3
CH(s)

This course is designed to prepare first-responder personnel to take the appropriate course of action at the scene of a potential terrorist incident. The course will provide students with a general understanding and recognition of terrorism, defensive considerations (biological, nuclear, incendiary, chemical and explosive), as well as command and control issues associated with criminal incidents. The student will be able to recognize and implement self-protective measures, secure the scene, complete appropriate notifications to local, State, and Federal authorities, and assist in completing a smooth transition from emergency to recovery and termination operations.

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

Must be admitted to the A.A.S. Homeland Security Degree Program or Pre-Homeland Security Program.

Pediatric First Aid & CPR
1
CH(s)

This course is designed to identify and prevent injuries in childhood. This course is ideal for anyone involved in pediatrics, childhood education, and child care fields. Accidental injuries are the leading health problem in children over the age of 1 year, and this program helps prepare the user for accidents involving children. This course presents all the latest information and procedures for first aid and CPR. Upon successful completion of the course providers will receive a The National Safety Council course completion card.

First Aid & CPR Instructor
1
CH(s)

During this course you will learn new methods that involve, influence and facilitate adult learning while refining your teaching skills. This course covers a proven, standardized method of teaching first aid, CPR and AED with high effectiveness and you will be provided with the reasons and dynamics behind each topic or visual presentation. The Standard First Aid, CPR and AED course topics include: Breathing and cardiac emergencies in adults, infants and children, identifying and caring for bleeding, sudden illnesses and injuries, preventing disease transmission and introduction to AED’s.

Principles of Extrication
1
CH(s)

The goals of this course are to provide a good basis to the principles of extrication rescue techniques through focusing on sound extrication philosophy and the emergency care of the entrapped patient. One of the main objectives of this course is to understand that good patient care during any extrication effort is an important aspect of successful rescues and it is strongly advised that  skills in patient treatment be emphasized to the fullest extent. The course includes team organization; rescue and safety considerations. In this course students will explore foundational concepts of safe and effective vehicle extraction.

Emergency Vehicle Driving
1
CH(s)

This course presents a comprehensive emergency vehicle driver training program that is designed to present the necessary classroom, competency course training, and testing for new and existing emergency vehicle drivers. The program will verify proficiency in the knowledge and understanding of, as well as, the practical application to emergency vehicle driving.

Guided Experience I
1-4
CH(s)

This course will be a guided experience for community college students to explore topics of interest in their field through research, field experience, presentation, computer applications, lab experience, or other project agreed upon between the student and the supervising faculty and is submitted to the dean in a written contract.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s), PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:

Credits earned may be applied as free electives in degree or certificate programs.

Special Topics in Emergency Medical Services
0-4
CH(s)

Studies in special selected topics, to be determined by the instructor and approved by the School Dean.  Credits earned will be applicable as free electives in associate and certificate of applied science degree programs. 

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s)
Note:
  • Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 2299 Special Topics designation. 
  • Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course. 
Advanced Cardiac Life Support
1
CH(s)

This two day course is designed to teach EMT - Intermediates, Paramedics, and other advanced life support health care professional the most current knowledge and skills in caring for adult patients with cardiac emergencies. Scenario based instructions is used to teach and evaluate the participants knowledge and skills.

Note:
  • Basic understanding of electrocardiography and arrhythmia recognition is recommended.
  • Participants who choose to be certified will be required to pay the necessary certification fees required by State or National certifying agencies.
Pediatric Education for the Pre-hospital Provider
1
CH(s)

This course represents a comprehensive source of pre-hospital medical information for the emergent care of infants and children. Developed by the American Academy of Pediatrics, this course is an exciting program designed specifically to teach pre-hospital professionals how to better access and manage ill or injured children.

Prerequisite(s):
EMMS 1103
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Advanced Medical Life Support
1
CH(s)

This course is an education program sponsored of the National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians. The program is endorsed by the National Association of EMS Physicians This program is for all levels of healthcare practitioners committed to providing quality care for patients in medical crisis. AMLS is a course that offers a “think-outside-the-box” method of assessing and managing a patient in medical crisis. It emphasizes using scene size up, interactive group discussion on potential treatment strategies, history, and probabilities in diagnosing a patient’s medical problem. AMLS implements an initial assessment-based approach that progresses to a diagnostic-based approach to develop a treatment plan for a specific medical condition.

Advanced Life Support Skills Lab
2
CH(s)

This course enhances the student’s development in the psychomotor skills of the paramedic. The Advanced Life Support (ALS) skills are integrated into the curriculum in such a way as to present skills in a sequential, building fashion. Initially, the skills are typically taught in isolation. In this course the skills are integrated into simulated patient care situations. The ALS Skills are set forth by the U.S. Department of Transportation National Safety Administration EMT Paramedic Curriculum.

Airway Management and Advanced Patient Assessment
2
CH(s)

In this course students will learn the proper approach to patient assessment and advanced airway management skills for both medical and trauma patients.

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

EMS Majors Only.

Pathophysiology and Shock Trauma Resuscitation
3
CH(s)

In this course students will learn the general principles of pathophysiology, treatment of shock and recognition and management of specific traumatic emergencies.

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

EMS Majors Only.

Emergency Medical Services-Practicum II
2
CH(s)

This course provides the student with the opportunity to observe and apply the skills learned in EMMS 2207, 2208 and ALLH 1106 in a supervised clinical setting including a local hospital emergency department, respiratory therapy department and operating room and on a field EMS unit.

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:
  • EMS Majors Only.
  • A minimum of 100 clinical hours is required and will be scheduled by the student on an individual basis through the EMS Coordinator.
Medical Emergencies II
4
CH(s)

In this course the student will review the pathophysiology, assessment and management of medical patients with pulmonary and cardiovascular emergencies.

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

EMS Majors Only.

Emergency Medical Services-Practicum III
2
CH(s)

This course provides the student with the opportunity to observe and apply the skills learned in EMMS 2210 in a supervised clinical setting including a local hospital emergency department, respiratory therapy, cardiac care unit, and on a field EMS unit.

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:
  • EMS Majors Only.
  • A minimum of 100 clinical hours is required and will be scheduled by the student on an individual basis through the EMS Coordinator.
Medical Emergencies II
4
CH(s)

In this course the student will review the pathophysiology, assessment ant management of medical patients with neurological and endocrinological emergencies, allergies and environmental emergencies, infectious and communicable diseases, behavioral, gynecological and obstetrical emergencies.

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

EMS Majors Only.

Special Patients & Situations
2
CH(s)

In this course the student will take an in-depth look at the approach to patients with special needs such as neonatal, pediatric and geriatric patients, patients with mental or physical impairments, or patients with high technology medical devices in the out-of-hospital setting.

Emergency Medical Services-Practicum IV
3
CH(s)

This course provides the student with the opportunity to observe and apply the skills learned in EMMS 2212 and 2213 in a supervised clinical setting including a local hospital emergency department, pediatric unit, obstetrical unit, psychiatric unit and on a field EMS unit.

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:
  • EMS Majors Only.
  • A minimum of 100 clinical hours is required and will be scheduled by the student on an individual basis through the EMS Coordinator.
Cardiology
3
CH(s)

 

The EMS student will be instructed on the pathophysiology, disease processes and assessment skills of the cardiac system. This includes advanced monitoring with capnography, 3 and 12 lead electrocardiogram interpretations.

Homeland Security-Practicum II
1
CH(s)

This course provides the student with the opportunity to observe and apply the skills learned in the homeland security core courses. The locations visited will include the Center for Rural Emergency Medicine, Local branch of the West Virginia Office of Emergency Services and field EMS unit rotations.

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:
  • HLS Majors Only.
  • A minimum of 24 hours is required and will be scheduled by the student on an individual basis through the EMS Coordinator.
Emergency Response to Terrorism: Tactical Considerations-EMS
3
CH(s)

This course is designed for first on-the-scene responding EMS personnel with the responsibility to render patient care to victims of terrorist incidents. The student will be trained in security considerations, identifying signs of terrorism, anticipating unusual response circumstances, assessing information, and initiating self-protection actions. The student also will apply their knowledge about responding to a terrorist event, providing patient care, identifying and preserving evidence, managing site safety, documenting the event, and debriefing personnel.

Homeland Security-Practicum III
1
CH(s)

This course provides the student with the opportunity to observe and apply the skills learned in the homeland security core courses. The locations visited will include Local Emergency Planning Committees, Fire Departments, and field EMS unit rotations.

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:
  • HLS Majors Only.
  • A minimum of 24 hours is required and will be scheduled by the student on an individual basis through the EMS Coordinator.
Basic Life Support and Hazardous Materials Response
3
CH(s)

This course will emphasize critical concerns for emergency medical responders at hazardous materials incidents. Elements of this course include safety issues for emergency medical service hazardous materials response, managing contaminated victims requiring emergency medical assistance, decontamination and treatment procedures of a basic life support nature, and transportation and receiving facilities. The course will assist the student in understanding and complying with Federal regulations and national recommendations concerning emergency medical response to hazardous materials incidents.

Homeland Security-Practicum IV
1
CH(s)

This course provides the student with the opportunity to observe and apply the skills learned in the homeland security core courses. The locations visited will include a branch of the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources, a branch of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and field EMS unit rotations.

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:
  • HLS Majors Only.
  • A minimum of 24 hours is required and will be scheduled by the student on an individual basis through the EMS Coordinator.
Medical Patient Emergencies I
4
CH(s)
Medical Patient Emergencies II
4
CH(s)
EMS Cardiology
3
CH(s)

The EMS student will be instructed on the pathophysiology, disease processes and assessment skills of the cardiac system. This includes advanced monitoring with capnography, and 3 and 12 lead electrocardiogram interpretations.

Corequisite(s):
EMMS 2231
Prerequisite(s):
EMMS 1103
EMS Cardiology Lab
1
CH(s)
This course provides laboratory practice and clinical application of technical and professional skills of cardiology, focusing on the assessment and monitoring techniques used in cardiac care. Course components include advanced cardiac monitoring, application of cardiac anatomy and physiology, cardiac rhythm interpretation, cardiac patient care assessment and care of specific cardiac diseases.
Corequisite(s):
EMMS 2230
Prerequisite(s):
EMMS 1103
Guided Experience II
1-4
CH(s)

This course will be an advanced guided experience for community college students to explore topics of interest in their field through research, field experience, presentation, computer applications, lab experience, or other project agreed upon between the student and the supervising faculty and is submitted to the dean in a written contract.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s), PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:

Credits earned may be applied as free electives in degree or certificate programs.

Special Topics in Emergency Medical Services
0-4
CH(s)

This course will provide an opportunity for students to further their study of principles and concepts in the field and to apply their knowledge in a variety of application both in the traditional classroom setting and in work/job related experiences. The class will be an individualized, arranged course, with learning outcomes determined by the instructor in consultation with the student and permission of the School Dean.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s)
Note:
  • Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 2299 Special Topics designation. 
  • Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course. 
Assessment Based Management
2
CH(s)

This course will serve as the cumulative review and remedial application of what the student has learned in EMMS 2207 - 2214. The course will focus on providing summative evaluation of the student’s performance in simulated situations and or scenarios.

Note:

Capstone Course.

English

Written English for Industry
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course is required for all students enrolled in the Power Plant Technology and Mechatronics programs and is designed to teach students the writing skills specific to the industrial workforce. The course will focus on two aspects of communications: writing technical documents, such as activity reports, workplace memoranda, and professional emails; and working collaboratively, including developing listening skills and working in groups.

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), At least one listed Prerequisite/Co-requisite Required
Note:

Prerequisite:  COMPASS Writing Skills score of 71, or ACT English score of 18 may substitute for English 0097. 

  • This course will not transfer to or from any other program as general education credit.
  • A “C” or better in ENGL 1005 is a graduation requirement.
  • Power Plant Technology and Mechatronics Majors only.
Written English I
3|4
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course offers a process-oriented practice in drafting, revising, and editing texts. Students learn the principles of expository writing, thesis formulation, organization, paragraph development, audience analysis, appropriate diction, and sentence structure. The course also includes an introduction to reading for content in texts selected from across the disciplines.

Other Info:
At least one listed Prerequisite/Co-requisite Required
Note:

Prerequisite:

  • 18 or higher on the English portion of ACT
  • 450 or higher on Critical Reading of SAT
  • A scaled score of 38 or higher on Writing  Skills Set  of ASSET
  • 88 or higher on Sentence Skills of ACCUPLACER
 
  • A grade of “C” or better in ENGL 1104 is a graduation requirement for all degrees.
  • ENGL 1104 is a prerequisite for enrollment in all other ENGL courses.

NOTICE TO STUDENTS

Any student who falls below the listed prerequisite will be required to take a four(4)-credit hour course.

Written English II
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

A continuation of Written English I that provides experience in analyzing and writing argument and persuasive prose. A central feature of the course is a library research project that is intended to develop familiarity with reference sources and skill in summarizing the diverse points of view of multiple sources.

Prerequisite(s):
ENGL 1104
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
  • A grade of “C” or better in ENGL 1108 is a graduation requirement for all degrees.
  • ENGL 1104 must have been completed with a grade of "C" or better.
Technical Report Writing
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course provides practice in writing expository documents and technical reports. In addition to scientific/ technical reports and proposals, students also write business letters, memoranda, and other types of written communication common to the industrial and business worlds.

Prerequisite(s):
ENGL 1104
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
  • Prerequisite: ENGL 1104 must have been completed with a grade of "C" or better.
  • If ENGL 1109 is required in the student’s program of study, course must be completed with a grade of "C" or better.
Introduction to Literature I: Prose Narratives
3
CH(s)

A study of narrative art both in fictional forms (the short story, the novel, allegory) and non-fictional forms (autobiography, personal essay), with readings from many cultures within a world context, giving substantial exposure to important works written in the last 100 years and to those written by women and minorities.

Prerequisite(s):
ENGL 1108, ENGL 1109
Other Info:
At least one listed Prerequisite/Co-requisite Required
Introduction to Literature I: Poetry & Drama
3
CH(s)

A study of the forms and conventions of the genres through close reading, discussion, and written response. Students will survey representative works from fifth-century Athens to the most contemporary voices. Relevant exposure will be given to poems and plays by and about women and minorities.

Prerequisite(s):
ENGL 1108, ENGL 1109
Other Info:
At least one listed Prerequisite/Co-requisite Required

Energy

Fluids I
3
CH(s)

This course is designed to introduce students to process and energy technology, fundamentals related to all process industries, as well as common plant components such as pumps, valves, heat exchangers, separators, cooling towers, fans, etc. The course also provides an elementary overview of common process technology systems such as electrical power generation, electrical and natural gas distribution and processing and typical manufacturing processes. The theory of operation of basic plant components and emission controls is included. This course is open to all Pierpont students who are interested in learning more about technology and exploring career options.

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:
  • (Formerly BITS 1012)
  • Open to Applied Process Technology, Power Plant Technology, Electric Utility Technology, Mechatronics, or Petroleum Technology majors only. Other students may be admitted with coordinator consent.
Process Fundamentals
2
CH(s)

This course is designed to introduce students to process and energy technology, fundamentals related to all process industries, as well as common plant components such as pumps, valves, heat exchangers, separators, cooling towers, fans, etc. The course also provides an elementary overview of common process technology systems such as electrical power generation, electrical and natural gas distribution and processing and typical manufacturing processes. The theory of operation of basic plant components and emission controls is included. This course is open to all Pierpont students who are interested in learning more about technology and exploring career options.

Mechanics I
3
CH(s)

This course will introduce and emphasize safe work practices and physical measurements, along with basic machine concepts, fasteners, and various hand tools.  Mechanical drive systems, including belt drives, chain drives, and gear drives, coupling and shaft alignment, lubrication, and typical power tool usage will be covered using training simulators.

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:
  • Open to Applied Process Technology, Power Plant Technology, Electric Utility Technology, Mechatronics, or Petroleum Technology majors only. Other students may be admitted with coordinator consent.
  • Combination of Mech I & II
  • (Formerly BITS 1013)
Electrical Machinery I
3
CH(s)

This course will introduce three phase electricity, ladder logic and single line diagrams, relays and contactors, DC and AC motors, and motor control circuits.

Prerequisite(s):
ENRG 1031
Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
  • Open to Applied Process Technology, Power Plant Technology, Electric Utility Technology, Mechatronics, or Petroleum Technology majors only. Other students may be admitted with coordinator consent.
  • (Formerly BITS 2014)
DC and AC Circuits
4
CH(s)

This is designed to teach students the basic concepts of electricity, voltage, current, power, and resistance.  Topics include fundamental circuit laws and their applications on basic DC circuit analysis, on series, parallel, and series-parallel circuits.  The course also covers basic concepts of alternating current specific to the industrial worksite including electromagnetism, transformers, motors, generators, circuit protection devices, and other key electrical components.

Corequisite(s):
MTH 1203
Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1203
Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

This course is open to Applied Process Technology, Power Plant Technology, Electric Utility Technology, Mechatronics, or Petroleum Technology majors only.  Other students may be admitted with coordinator consent.

Energy Systems I
3
CH(s)

This is designed to teach students about the basic operating principles of water treatments, power generation systems as well as mid-stream oil and gas distribution and environmental control systems.

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

This course is open to Applied Process Technology, Power Plant Technology, Electric Utility Technology, Mechatronics, or Petroleum Technology majors only. Other students may be admitted with coordinator consent.

Print Reading
2
CH(s)

This course is designed to enable students to read and interpret Piping and Instrumentation Diagrams (P&ID) Electrical Drawings, and Hydraulic and Pneumatic Drawings.  Students learn industry recognized symbols used in each type of drawing and learn to trace system flow paths, circuitry,  and identify control loops.

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

This course is open to Applied Process Technology, Power Plant Technology, Electric Utility Technology, Mechatronics, or Petroleum Technology majors only. Other students may be admitted with coordinator consent.

Energy Systems II
3
CH(s)

This course is designed to teach students advanced system power generation systems related to turbine auxiliary and controls systems as well as advanced systems for petroleum processing plants.

Corequisite(s):
ENRG 1011
Prerequisite(s):
ENRG 1011
Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

This course is open to Applied Process Technology, Power Plant Technology, Electric Utility Technology, Mechatronics, or Petroleum Technology majors only. Other students may be admitted with coordinator consent.

Basic Instrumentation and Process Control
3
CH(s)

This course is designed to teach students the basics of industrial instrumentation and process control and final control devices.  Topics include temperature, pressure, flow and level measurement and controls as well as final control elements, such as motor speed controls, dampers and valves.  The course introduces students to PID control using lab mockups and laptop control units.

Corequisite(s):
ENRG 1031
Prerequisite(s):
ENRG 1031
Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

This course is open to Applied Process Technology, Power Plant Technology, Electric Utility Technology, Mechatronics, or Petroleum Technology majors only. Other students may be admitted with coordinator consent.

Advanced Analytical Instrumentation
3
CH(s)

This course is a continuation of ENRG 1043 Basic Instrumentation and Controls.  It is designed to teach students the operation and application of analytical instruments commonly used in process industry   such as Ph, moisture, opacity, density, and gas monitors and analyzers.  The course also covers complex two and three point process control integration, chart recorders as well as fundamentals of tube bending and fabrication.

Prerequisite(s):
ENRG 1043
Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

This course is open to Applied Process Technology, Power Plant Technology, Electric Utility Technology, Mechatronics, or Petroleum Technology majors only. Other students may be admitted with coordinator consent.

Instrument Calibration, Loop Tuning, and Wireless Communications Systems
3
CH(s)

This course builds on ENRG 1044 and ENRG 1045.  Students will learn how to calibrate instruments and tune multiple point control systems.  Students will also learn how wireless control instrumentation systems operate.  Advanced troubleshooting on complex control systems will be emphasized.

Prerequisite(s):
ENRG 1044
Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

This course is open to Applied Process Technology, Power Plant Technology, Electric Utility Technology, Mechatronics, or Petroleum Technology majors only.  Other students may be admitted with coordinator consent.

Process Safety, Tooling/Mechanics
2
CH(s)

This course has an on-line component.  The course is only used as an alternative to ENRG 1995 in the event that students cannot meet prerequisites for ENRG 1995 or if a sufficient number of internship opportunities are not available.  The course covers mechanical systems, rigging, shop essentials, fasteners. A live component includes power plant and tours of mid-stream and downstream related facilities with follow up reports and presentations done by students.

Other Info:
PR: Instructor Approval Required, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

This course is open to Applied Process Technology, Power Plant Technology, Electric Utility Technology, Mechatronics, or Petroleum Technology majors only.

Applied Process Technology Internship
2
CH(s)

This course is a paid internship in which the student works for a process industry employer that corresponds to their career track under this program (e.g. Power Station Internship, Midstream or Downstream Internship, Instrumentation Technician or Manufacturing)  The internship consists of a structured work environment in which the student refines the skills and knowledge that they have achieved through the program coursework under the mentorship of qualified process industry professionals.

Other Info:
PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:

This course is open to Applied Process Technology, Power Plant Technology, Electric Utility Technology, Mechatronics, or Petroleum Technology majors only.

Mechanics II
3
CH(s)

This course covers installation of bearings, gaskets, and clutch and brake systems.  Basic rigging principles will be studied and practiced.  

Prerequisite(s):
ENRG 1020
Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
  • Prerequisite:  Instructor/Coordinator approval may be substituted for ENRG 1020.
  • Open to Applied Process Technology, Power Plant Technology, Electric Utility Technology, Mechatronics, or Petroleum Technology majors only. Other students may be admitted with coordinator consent.
Electrical Machinery II
3
CH(s)

This course is a continuation of ENRG 1030.  Electric motor control circuits will be covered including basic motor starters, 2 and 3 wire control circuits, reversing circuits, stop and emergency stop circuits, reduced voltage applications, timing and delay circuits and troubleshooting.

Prerequisite(s):
ENRG 1030
Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
  • Prerequisite: Coordinator/Instructor Approval may be substituted for ENRG 1030.
  • Open to Applied Process Technology, Power Plant Technology, Electric Utility Technology, Mechatronics, or Petroleum Technology majors only. Other students may be admitted with coordinator consent.
  • (Formerly BITS 2024)
Industrial Safety
3
CH(s)

This course covers a foundational overview of best industry practices and guidelines for health, safety, and environmental issues facing the process industry.  Students will gain practical knowledge in a variety of topics to help them stay healthy, keep safe and protect the environment to allow them longevity in the process industry. Hazard Recognition is also included in the study of OSHA standards and regulations.

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:
  • Open to Applied Process Technology, Power Plant Technology, Electric Utility Technology, Mechatronics, or Petroleum Technology majors only. Other students may be admitted with coordinator consent.
Emerging Energy Technologies
3
CH(s)

This course will consist of a study of Emerging Process Technologies including, Integrated Gasification with Carbon Capture Technology, Gas Turbines, Combined Cycle Units, Wind Power Generation, Solar Power Generation, Nuclear Power, and optionally, petroleum mid-stream and downstream operations.

Prerequisite(s):
ENRG 1040, ENRG 1042
Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
  • Prerequisite:  Instructor/Coordinator approval may be substituted for ENRG 1040 and ENRG 1042.
  • Open to Applied Process Technology, Power Plant Technology, Electric Utility Technology, Mechatronics, or Petroleum Technology majors only. Other students may be admitted with coordinator consent.
Communications and Leadership
3
CH(s)

This course focuses on personal and professional communication and leadership skills. It examines the nature of communication in the world of work. Students will examine and practice individual, group and presentational communication skills necessary to work effectively with peers, supervisors, supervisees and constituents. Topics addressed will include interpersonal communication, organizational culture, group dynamics, leadership, power and status, meeting facilitation, problem solving, presentation research, organization and delivery and basic project management.

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

This course is open to Applied Process Technology, Power Plant Technology, Electric Utility Technology, Mechatronics, or Petroleum Technology majors only. Other students may be admitted with coordinator consent.

Plant Simulation
3
CH(s)

This course is designed to teach students the typical power plant start up and shut down sequences and monitoring of a coal fired or gas fired power plant operation.  The course uses a plant referenced simulator that introduces the students to plant startup and integrated plant systems.  To the extent that simulations become available, mid-stream and downstream process facility simulations may also be covered.

Corequisite(s):
ENRG 1040, ENRG 1042
Prerequisite(s):
ENRG 1040, ENRG 1042
Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
This course is open to Applied Process Technology, Power Plant Technology, Electric Utility Technology, Mechatronics, or Petroleum Technology majors only.

Entrepreneurial Studies

Introduction to Entrepreneurship
2
CH(s)

This is an introductory course that explores the fundamental concepts of entrepreneurship and the initial considerations to start-up a new business venture. The course will demonstrate the basics of how to organize, manage, market, and finance a start-up venture. Students will craft a basic framework of a Business Plan that can be further developed independently or as a working project in other courses required in the Entrepreneurial Studies Certificate program.

Prerequisite(s):
ENGL 1104
Other Info:
At least one listed Prerequisite/Co-requisite Required
Note:

Prerequisite: Minimum ACT Reading score of 17 or COMPASS Reading score of 75 may be substituted for ENGL 1104.

Business Opportunities Analysis
1
CH(s)

This course demonstrates the basic techniques and skills that entrepreneurs use to identify business ideas; conduct focused research to refine the concept; analyze core financial information and market factors that affect the chances for business success; and test concepts for viability in a specific market.  Students will develop ideas for a potential start-up business, examine key market factors, and conduct basic market research to test viability of their concept. 

Prerequisite(s):
ENTR 1100
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Critical Thinking and Analysis for Small Business Owners
1
CH(s)

This course covers the basic critical thinking and analysis skills and topics for small business owners. Students will evaluate common small business issues using critical analysis tools and methods with the goal of improving business operations and performance.

Prerequisite(s):
ENTR 1100
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Funding Your Venture
1
CH(s)

This course will guide students through the process of determining funding needs and exploring funding opportunities. Topics will include capital and collateral, loans, grants and grant writing, micro-lending, equity financing, angel investors, and venture capital. Resources and financing tools will be discussed.

Prerequisite(s):
ENTR 1100
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

Prerequisite: Minimum COMPASS Math score of 17, or ACT Math score of 19, or completion of MATH 0081-0084.

Mentorship & Business Support Resources
1
CH(s)

This course covers the necessity for business owners to develop quality business relationships and gain access to supportive business resources. Topics will include the following: establishing a mentor relationship with more experienced and successful business owners; accessing  informational resources to stay abreast of changes that impact business performance and success; and securing business support resources that assist entrepreneurs to start, grow, and succeed in business. Students will research various types of business support resources and draft a resource plan for a start-up in its early stages.

Prerequisite(s):
ENTR 1100
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Business Plan Development
3
CH(s)

This course covers the importance of planning the initial development and expansion of a start-up business. Topics will include the following: determining required information to include in the plan; drafting a business plan using business plan software; tailoring a business plan for a specific target audience; and “pitching” the plan to potential investors and other key contacts. Students will draft a business plan that could be used as a guide to start an actual business.

Prerequisite(s):
ENTR 1100, ENTR 1110, ENTR 1120, ENTR 1130, ENTR 1140
Other Info:
PR: Instructor Approval Required, All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

Prerequisites: 

  • All courses must be completed with a grade of "C" or better.
  • Consideration will be given to relevant advanced or equivalent courses to ENTR 1120 through 1140 and/or business ownership or startup experience, which may substitute for ENTR 1120-1140, but not for ENTR 1100, which must be completed with a grade of "C" or better.

Electric Utility Technology

Electric Utility Practice I
3
CH(s)

Line Worker (Section 01):  Supervised practical applications of electrical overhead line worker job duties in a setting under direct supervision of FirstEnergy personnel. Emphasis on skills to safely climb wood poles, the operation of a line truck, setting poles, framing poles on the ground, and operation of a digger derrick.  Upon completion of training, student will successfully pass the Class “A” Commercial Driver’s License skills test.  Rigging, wire identification, and use of rubber goods will also be learned.  Safety topics include:  Rigging Safety Awareness; Fall Protection; Flame Retardant Personal Protective Equipment; Medic First-Aid; Bloodborne Pathogens; and, Good Housekeeping.
 

Substation Worker (Section 02):  This course is the first in a series of four which provides the student with the basic knowledge and skills necessary to assist with the performance of maintenance and testing in substations and switchyards.
 

Note:

This course is for both Line Worker (typically Section 01) and Substation Worker (typically Section 02).  Students should ensure they are enrolled in the correct Section relevant to his/her specialization.

Basic DC Circuits
3
CH(s)

This course is designed for students enrolled in energy related technology programs.  It is designed to teach students the basic concepts of electricity, voltage, current, power, and resistance.  Topics include fundamental circuit laws and their applications on basic DC circuit analysis.  Series, parallel, and series-parallel DC circuits will be analyzed extensively.

Corequisite(s):
MTH 1203
Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
  • Power Plant Technology, Electric Utility Technology, Mechatronics, or Petroleum Technology Majors only.
Basic AC Circuits
3
CH(s)

This course is required for all students enrolled in energy related technology programs.  It is designed to teach students the basic concepts of alternating current specific to the industrial worksite. Topics include series and parallel circuits, electromagnetism, transformers, motors, generators, circuit protection devices, and other key electrical components, and an overview of site and off-site electrical distribution.

Prerequisite(s):
EUTP 1165
Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
  • Power Plant Technology, Electric Utility Technology, Mechatronics, or Petroleum Technology Majors only.
  • Prerequisite: PWPL 1199 Basic DC must be completed with a grade of "C" or better.
Electric Utility Practice II
3
CH(s)

Line Worker (Section 01):  Supervised practical applications of electrical overhead line worker job duties in a setting under personal supervision of FirstEnergy personnel. Emphasis on skills required to perform work on secondary voltage circuits. Emphasis on the installation of services, street lighting, and secondary circuits, bucket truck familiarization and bucket rescue.  Overview of distribution electrical systems, and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) rules are also included. Based on Commercial Driver’s License (CDL) training schedule in EUTP 1100, some students may complete training and securement of Class “A” CDL as part of EUTP 1200.  Safety topics include:  Work Zone Traffic Control; Minimum Approach Distances; Rubber Protective Equipment; and Knowledge of UD Excavation/Trenching/Shoring.

Substation Worker (Section 02):  This course is the second in a four part series providing the student with a broader skill set as well as enhanced knowledge and skill level necessary to safely assist in the performance of routine repairs on distribution and power transformers, bushings, circuit breakers, disconnect switches, control equipment and other de-energized electrical equipment used in the distribution of electrical energy.


 

Note:

This course is for both Line Worker (typically Section 01) and Substation Worker (typically Section 02).  Students should ensure they are enrolled in the correct Section relevant to his/her specialization.

Electric Utility Field Experience
0
CH(s)

Following successful completion of the second semester of the Electric Utility Technology program, qualified students are required to participate in a compensated, 10-week (40 hr/week) evaluated field experience. Work assignments begin in May and end in August.


 

Other Info:
PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:

Pre-employment screening with FirstEnergy is required.

Electric Utility Practice III Line Worker
4
CH(s)

Line Worker (Section 01): Supervised practical applications of electrical overhead line worker job duties in a setting under personal supervision of FirstEnergy personnel.  Emphasis on skills required to identify, install, and maintain primary underground residential distribution (URD) equipment, including various methods of troubleshooting URD primary and secondary circuits.  Grounding distribution circuits will also be learned.  Students will develop the knowledge and skill to safely perform rubber gloving assignments utilizing the insulate and isolate techniques, will perform various tasks while working on an energized three-phase circuit under controlled conditions.  Safety topics include:  fire extinguisher safety, temporary protective grounds, stored energy devices, and utilities protective service.

Substation Worker (Section 02):  This course is the third in a four part series providing the student with the advanced knowledge and skills necessary to safely work in a supervised capacity on energized equipment and in an unsupervised capacity on de-energized equipment employed in the production and distribution of electrical energy.  This course also introduces the student to power transformer testing, troubleshooting, alarm systems, circuit breaker troubleshooting, reclosers and sectionalizers, OCB maintenance and voltage regulators.

 

Note:

This course is for both Line Worker (typically Section 01) and Substation Worker (typically Section 02).  Students should ensure they are enrolled in the correct Section relevant to his/her specialization.

Electric Utility Practice IV Line Worker
4
CH(s)

Line Worker (Section 01):  Supervised practical applications of electrical overhead line worker job duties in a setting under direct supervision of FirstEnergy personnel. Emphasis on line equipment, hot line tools, power industrial trucks, and transmission (including wood pole, steel pole, ladder, and tower climbing).  Bucket, Pole Top, and Self Rescue will also be reviewed.  Safety topics include:  Spill Response, Live Line Tools, Hazardous Communications, and Accident Prevention Handbook review.

Substation Worker (Section 02):  This course is the fourth and final semester in a four part series providing the student with the knowledge and skills to work safely and competently in a supervised or unsupervised capacity.  The fourth semester is the culmination of prior courses with the introduction of advanced knowledge and skills related to Motor Operates Air Brake Switch, electronic recloser controls, SF6 gas breakers, ACB maintenance, OCB timing and travel tests, calibration of various substation equipment, PT testing, phasing, switching procedures and the performance of energized primary work.  The work activities in this final semester will be performed in a crew setting and will require continuous team work with fellow students.

 

Note:

This course is for both Line Worker (typically Section 01) and Substation Worker (typically Section 02).  Students should ensure they are enrolled in the correct Section relevant to his/her specialization.

Power Systems Institute Capstone
3
CH(s)

This course is designed as the capstone for the Electric Utility Technology program. This course will examine and emphasize workplace practices including; workplace ethics, values, professionalism, diversity, time management strategies, corporate communications, and maintaining balance in life skills.  At the end of this course students will develop an online journal that will show how they are able to demonstrate the skills, professional values and ethics, as well as demonstrate effective communication with customers and co-workers necessary to function in a line worker or substation worker position in the electric utility industry.

 

Other Info:
PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:

Students must be in their last semester of the PSI program to enroll.

Events Management

Events Coordination
3
CH(s)

This course is intended to provide a solid understanding of the numerous tasks and details involved in developing and coordinating events. Students will examine practical and creative aspects of coordinating the event through sizes and types of events, leadership, financial management, creating a proposal, protocol and the process in choosing site selections, entertainment, décor, travel, catering, registration and other staging considerations.

Wedding Planning
3
CH(s)

This course is intended to demonstrate the proper procedures of planning a wedding to ensure a successful and perfect wedding day. Students will discuss everything a wedding planner does from budget preparation to planning the reception.

Corporate Events Planning
3
CH(s)

This course will cover the numerous tasks and details involved in coordinating events hosted by hotels, resorts and conference centers. Focus will be primarily on the business, corporate, government customer, and will also include large private events. Students will examine the practical and creative aspects of coordinating major events, including conventions, political rallies, expos, corporate training and seminars, as well as large private receptions and parties. Events hosted by hotels and conference centers require sound business practices including establishing a customer profile, strong financial planning and management, vendor relations, management of multiple contracts, and accurate attention to details. Protocol and process in choosing entertainment, decor, travel arrangements, catering, registration and other staging considerations are covered.

Prerequisite(s):
EVMG 1101, EVMG 1103
Other Info:
PR: Instructor Approval Required, At least one listed Prerequisite/Co-requisite Required

Finance

Principles of Banking
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course is a survey of and introduction to the field of banking, with some concentration on the functions and operations of commercial banks. It also covers other depository institutions, non-bank financial entities, the Federal Reserve System, the nature of interest, bank regulation, the vocabulary of banking and some current banking issues.

Introduction to Financial Management
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

This course is intended to give the student a background in the field of financial management, with emphasis on cost of capital, cost of external capital, cost of retained earnings, and similar concepts. It will also cover material investment decisions and financial decisions.

Prerequisite(s):
ACCT 2201
Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only
Financial Literacy
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course provides students with the framework and tools for preparing personal financial plans that serve as roadmaps for goal achievement. It emphasizes the dynamics of the personal financial planning process by considering the impact of life changes - birth, marriage, divorce, job and career, and death.

Real Estate Principles
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

A general introduction to real estate as a business and as a profession, this course is designed to acquaint the student with the wide range of subjects and terminology necessary to the practice of real estate. The course will include the nature of real estate and ownership, principles and concepts of title transfer, title insurance, real estate marketing, financing, leasing, taxation, insurance, development, appraising and state license law. The objective of the course is to equip the student with concepts needed to continue successfully in future real estate courses and to pass the real estate salesmen’s license examination.

Real Estate Law
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course is a study of the principles of law governing the interests in real estate including acquisition, encumbrance, transfer, rights and regulations thereof. The object of the course is to equip the student to analyze the legal consequences of various legal relationships, and legal transactions, and to determine when an attorney should be consulted. The objective of the course is to equip the student with concepts needed to continue successfully in future real estate courses and to pass the real estate salesmen’s license examination.

Prerequisite(s):
FINC 2260
Principles of Insurance
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course is primarily concerned with developing an understanding of the basic principles of insurance, as well as the nature and operation of the insurance business. Emphasis is given to the principles which underlie the entire field of insurance. Students will develop understanding of the fundamental areas of indemnity, insurable interest, coinsurance, risk, subrogation, proximate cause, other insurance, requisites of insurable risks, deductibles, valued policies, probability and many others. The important functional areas of rating, underwriting, marketing and adjusting are considered, as well as the subjects of regulation, reinsurance and company organization.

Bank Internship
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

Selected students are placed in part-time banking positions with area financial institutions. The student has the opportunity to put theory into practice, while developing competencies through on-the-job training. Only full-time students pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree ma participate in the program.

Prerequisite(s):
ACCT 2202, FINC 1180
Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
  • Preference is given to students with a concentration in Finance or Accounting.
  • May be repeated for up to six hours credit.

Folklife/Folklore Studies

Introduction to Museums
3
CH(s)

This course will introduce students to the various types of museums (historical, art, historic site/house, representational etc.). It includes presenting a general overview of museum operations, programming, fund raising, grant writing, volunteer management, interpretation, exhibit design and construction, personnel training and management, collections management, and museum networking.

Folk Arts
3
CH(s)

This studio course gives students a hands-on learning approach to the historical understanding and making traditional/historical folk arts. Various materials will be used including fiber, wood, metal, paper, natural materials, and more to explore weaving/quilting, carving, tinsmithing/metal tooling, marbling/book binding/band box construction, doll making, and other traditional folk arts and crafts. An element of research will also be included in this course.

Guided Experience I
1-4
CH(s)

This course will be a guided experience for community college students to explore topics of interest in their field through research, field experience, presentation, computer applications, lab experience, or other project agreed upon between the student and the supervising faculty and is submitted to the dean in a written contract.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s), PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:

Credits earned may be applied as free electives in degree or certificate programs.

Special Topics in Folklife Studies
0-4
CH(s)

Studies in special selected topics, to be determined by the instructor and approved by the School Dean. 

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s)
Note:
  • Credits earned will be applicable as free electives in associate and certificate of applied science degree programs. 
  • Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 1199 Special Topics designation. 
  • Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course. 
Introduction to Folklore
3
CH(s)

This course is an introduction to conceptual foundations in folklore, such as its social base, tradition, folklore and cultural history, folklore as projection, genre, function, structure, text and context, through a historical and philosophical survey of approaches to folklore topics. Emphasis will be placed on the Appalachian cultural perspective. A field study lab of one hour will accompany this course.

Museum Education Programming
3
CH(s)

This course allows students to explore all types of museum programming with special emphasis on children’s visitation, special events, adult programming, lecture series, fairs and festivals. Special attention will be drawn to the various educational techniques and tools used as well as evaluation processes. The design and publication of museum materials such as handbooks, exhibit cards, exhibition catalogues, research and information books, journals, and newsletters. Will be covered in this course. A major goal of this course is to establish understandings of museum/school relationships as well as an enhancement of general public lifelong learning experiences.

Prerequisite(s):
FOLK 1100
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Museum Collections Management
3
CH(s)

This course will address a variety regarding museum collections including paper memorabilia, three dimensional artifacts, buildings, grounds, and other structures. The technical aspects of managing collections such as acquiring, identifying, processing, cataloging, storing, displaying, preserving, conserving, and researching will be the focus in this course.

Prerequisite(s):
FOLK 1100
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Museum Exhibit Design and Preparation
3
CH(s)

This course will include museum exhibit planning, research, text writing, design, construction, and installation of various types of storyline exhibits and presentations. Techniques will include computer graphics, photography, silk-screening, dry mounting, fixture and kiosk construction, lighting/ventilation/audio visual application, and other technical processes.

Prerequisite(s):
FOLK 1100
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Museum Interpretation
3
CH(s)

This course explores museum interpretation to the public, researchers, and school children, as well as training museum staff, administration, volunteers, students, and interns. Various avenues of actual interpretation will include the use of the museum facilities, buildings, artifacts, and publications. It may include oral interpretation, first person role play, costumed interpreter/demonstrator, and third person presentations.

Prerequisite(s):
FOLK 1100
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Guided Experience II
1-4
CH(s)

This course will be an advanced guided experience for community college students to explore topics of interest in their field through research, field experience, presentation, computer applications, lab experience, or other project agreed upon between the student and the supervising faculty and is submitted to the dean in a written contract.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s), PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:

Credits earned may be applied as free electives in degree or certificate programs.

Folk Art/Craft Apprenticeship
0-4
CH(s)

During these course hours, students will work directly with master craft persons that have been chosen and arranged by Pierpont Technical and Community College. Students will work in the master craft person’s studio to become proficient in the folk art/craft media chosen.

Prerequisite(s):
FOLK 1150
Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s)
Note:
  • May be repeated up to 12 credit hours.
  • Prerequisite: Instructor Approval may be substituted for FOLK 1150.
Special Topics in Folklife Studies
0-4
CH(s)

This course will provide an opportunity for students to further their study of principles and concepts in the field and to apply their knowledge in a variety of application both in the traditional classroom setting and in work/job related experiences. The class will be an individualized, arranged course, with learning outcomes determined by the instructor in consultation with the student and permission of the School Dean.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s)
Note:
  • Credits earned will be applicable as free electives in associate and certificate of applied science degree programs. 
  • Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 2299 Special Topics designation. 
  • Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course. 
Museum Internship
1-3
CH(s)

This internship course will place the student in a hands-on museum located experience. Students will be placed in the museum type (historical, art, etc.) of their choice and will have as many “real” application experiences with interpretation, exhibit design and construction, collections management, public museum educational programming, administrative management, etc. that can be arranged with the museum of choice. Pre-internship conferencing between the student, museum representative, and the program coordinator will be expected. Conferencing will continue during the experience as well.

Prerequisite(s):
FOLK 1100
Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s)
Note:
  • May be repeated up to 6 credit hours, including summer placement.
  • Capstone course.

Food Service Management

ServSafe®
1
CH(s)

Students will master multiple modules relating to topics on food service sanitation. Upon completion of the course, students will be prepared to successfully take the ServSafe® exam.

Nutrition
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course is a study of the nutrients, their sources, and their relationship to body functions. Each stage of the life cycle will be studied as it relates to changing nutritional requirements for individuals and family groups of varying cultural and economic levels. Students will evaluate their daily nutritional intake against recommended daily allowances.

Intro to the Food Service and Hospitality Industry
1
CH(s)

This course is an overview of all aspects of the hotel, foodservice, restaurant, and travel and tourism businesses, including operations, marketing, and sales. Trends in this rapidly changing industry will be stressed.

Nutrition in Childhood & Adolescence
3
CH(s)

This course will provide an overview of basic nutrition as well as nutrient standards used to evaluate nutrition status among Americans. Specific focus will include nutrition needs from pre-pregnancy through adolescence. Students will evaluate the new dietary guidelines and food pyramid system and complete a menu planning assignment and a computer-aided diet analysis for an individual between the ages of 2-18.

Food Service Facilities & Equipment
1
CH(s)

The emphasis is on food service equipment selection and layout in relation to production and workflow. Specifications, energy sources, use and care of food service equipment will be included in the course. Students will demonstrate the utilization and care of selected food service equipment in a laboratory setting.

Safety & Sanitation -ServSafe*
2
CH(s)

This course is a look at the latest information in the science of food safety along with appropriate principles to maintain food safety in an operation and to protect against food borne illness. 

Note:
  • Students completing the final certification exam with a minimum score of 75% will be issued a certificate of completion.
  • This course incorporates the National Restaurant Association’s certification curriculum. 
  • Students will be eligible to become ServSafe Certified at the end of this course.
Basic Baking
1
CH(s)

This course will provide students with an introduction to the science of baking including the purpose of common ingredients found in the bakeshop, the effect of certain baking techniques and the application of culinary math to recipe conversions.  Students will study the procedures used to prepare the following categories of baked goods: cookies, quick breads, pies, cakes, basic yeast doughs, Pate a Choux, and pastry fillings and sauces.  This course will also review history of the pastry industry and current industry trends. 

Corequisite(s):
FOSM 1131
Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

FOSM majors only.

Basic Baking Lab
2
CH(s)

This course applies the fundamentals of the baking science to the preparation of a variety of pastry and baking products in a lab environment.  Labs will include application of the techniques studies in FOSM 1130 Basic Baking with an emphasis on presentation.  This course will also include the use and care of equipment found n a modern bakery.

Corequisite(s):
FOSM 1130
Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

FOSM majors only.

Food Service Cost Analysis & Management
3
CH(s)

This course will enable students to perform basic cost analysis related to food service operations. The student will perform calculations associated with food costs, labor costs, menu pricing, and other pertinent management functions.

Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only
Sports Nutrition
3
CH(s)

This course will provide an introduction to sports nutrition including definitions of sports nutrition and general nutrition concepts, a review of digestion and energy metabolism, a thorough explanation of macronutrients, micronutrients, and water as they relate to athletic performance. The course will also review the most current research as it relates to the energy systems and specific nutrition needs of athletes in three categories - endurance, strength/power, and team sports.

Cafeteria Management in Schools
3
CH(s)

This course will provide an overview of basic child nutrition operations as well as managerial skills and knowledge of managing child nutrition programs. Course outcomes will equip cafeteria mangers with the necessary knowledge, skills and work practices to positively impact their programs and improve work practices to support program changes that address the many health issues confronting our children.

Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Cafeteria Manager’s Institute (a 3-day training session provided by the WVDE) is required as a prerequisite to enrollment.

Local Market Agriculture
3
CH(s)

This course will cover topics in small farm viability and will explore the collaboration between farmers and chefs in supporting and promoting the local food market. In addition, students will examine local farmers’ most common direct marketing opportunities. The student will be able to develop a farm to restaurant model, which will illustrate the importance of sharing the value of local foods.

Dining Room Service
1
CH(s)

This course examines the concepts, principles, and systems of dining room service. Topics include types of table service, dining room organization and table settings, staffing, responsibilities of dining room personnel, customer sales and service. 

Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only
Professionalism
2
CH(s)

In this career readiness course, students will build a professional portfolio, be prepared to apply and interview for jobs, and interact appropriately with others in the workforce. Specific instruction will be devoted to topics such as communication skills, etiquette, and time management. 

Guided Experience I
1-4
CH(s)

This course will be a guided experience for community college students to explore topics of interest in their field through research, field experience, presentation, computer applications, lab experience, or other project agreed upon between the student and the supervising faculty and is submitted to the dean in a written contract.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s), PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:

Credits earned may be applied as free electives in degree or certificate programs.

Special Topics in Food Service
0-4
CH(s)

Studies in special selected topics, to be determined by the instructor and approved by the School Dean.  Credits earned will be applicable as free electives in associate and certificate of applied science degree programs. 

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s)
Note:
  • Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 1199 Special Topics designation. 
  • Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course. 
Introduction to Foods
3
CH(s)

This course is a study in the selection, storage, preparation, and presentation of food. This three credit hour course will investigate each of the following categories of food and apply knowledge gained to laboratory applications: Milk & Dairy Products; Meat, Poultry & Shellfish; Fruits & Vegetables; Grains & Starches; Breads; Desserts; & Beverages. Emphasis will be placed on meal planning, food safety, nutrient value, and quality in taste and appearance.

Principles of Food Selection & Preparation
2
CH(s)

This course provides a study of the selection, storage, preparation, and presentation of food. Students will investigate each of the following categories of food and apply knowledge gained to practical applications in the laboratory setting: Stocks and sauces, soups, meat and game, poultry and game birds, fish and shellfish, vegetables, potatoes and starches, salads and salad dressings, sandwiches, breakfast preparation, and dairy products. Emphasis will be placed on ensuring food safety, nutrient value, and quality in taste and appearance.

Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

FOSM Majors Only.

Principles of Quantity Food Production
2
CH(s)

Principles and techniques of quantity food preparation will be covered. Emphasis will be given to menu planning, use of standardized recipes, and quantity food production techniques.

Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only, All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Principles of Food Selection & Preparation Lab
2
CH(s)

Students will apply basic principles of food selection and preparation in a controlled lab setting. Labs will include application of basic food science and food evaluation techniques.

Corequisite(s):
FOSM 2201
Prerequisite(s):
FOSM 1121, FOSM 1100, FOSM 1122
Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

Required Corequisite:  FOSM 2201.
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): FOSM 1100, 1121 OR 1122.
FOSM Majors Only.

Principles of Quantity Food Production Lab
2
CH(s)

Students will apply basic principles of food selection and preparation in a controlled lab setting. Labs will include application of basic food science and food evaluation techniques.

Corequisite(s):
FOSM 2202
Prerequisite(s):
FOSM 2203
Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

Required Corequisite:  FOSM 2202.
Prerequisite(s) or Corequisite(s): FOSM 2203.
FOSM Majors Only.

Food Specialties-Garde Manger II
3
CH(s)

This course is the advanced garde mange techniques including aspic pates, sauces, terrines, and garnishes. The manipulation of special tools used in this type of food preparation is stressed. Buffet table arrangement, food display, and organization are studied.

Prerequisite(s):
FOSM 2203
Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

FOSM Majors Only.

Culinary Competitions
1-4
CH(s)

Students will produce innovative, competition quality food. Students will use advanced culinary techniques to showcase their creations for constructive critique. Students should expect to practice on their own a minimum of two hours for every one hour in class.

Corequisite(s):
FOSM 2203
Prerequisite(s):
FOSM 2203
Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s), Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
  • May be repeated up to 12 CHs.
  • FOSM Majors Only.
Diet Therapy
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course discusses the nutritional needs of different age groups, the special nutritional requirements in various diseases and the planning of menus to meet these various nutritional needs.

Prerequisite(s):
FOSM 1110
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Purchasing and Receiving
3
CH(s)

Includes factors to consider in selecting, purchasing, receiving, and storing various foods. Emphasis is given to the development of purchasing policies, procedures, inventory control and storage. Computer application is included in the course.

Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only
Resort & Hotel Management
3
CH(s)

Students will study four primary areas of the resort and hotel lodging businesses; service and guest services, housekeeping, catering and banquets, and front desk operations. Students will focus on the revenue and cost centers associated with hotel industry. Emphasis will also be placed on management of rooms, food and beverage, marketing, engineering, accounting, human resources, and security.

Food & Beverage Merchandising
3
CH(s)

This course discusses catering for different types of social functions, dining room arrangement, and service to gain customer satisfaction. It also deals with purchase specifications, management and quality as applied to tableware, furnishing, equipment, and supplies.

Food Service Organization & Management
3
CH(s)

The students will analyze the organization and management of various types of food service programs. Special emphasis is placed on personnel, operating systems, budgeting, purchasing, work schedules, and supervision.

Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only
Food Service Internship
6
CH(s)

This course is designed to provide supervised instruction during a paid work experience conducted in an assigned food service or hospitality operation. Course may be repeated up to 18 hours of credit based on emphasis area. Variable credit. 

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

FOSM majors only 

Advanced Baking
1
CH(s)

Students will develop skills in advanced baking techniques, bread making, pastries, and cake decorating. The class will also include information on the corollary business aspects, such as calculating size and determining costs.

Corequisite(s):
FOSM 1130
Prerequisite(s):
FOSM 1130
Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

If FOSM 1130 not previously taken, must be taken as a co-requisite.
FOSM Majors Only.

Advanced Baking Laboratory
2
CH(s)

Students will build on baking foundations acquired in FOSM 1131. Students will develop advanced baking techniques as applied to breads, pastries, and cake production. 

Corequisite(s):
FOSM 2230
Prerequisite(s):
FOSM 1130, FOSM 1131
Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

FOSM majors only 

Pastry & Confections
1
CH(s)

Students will develop skills in advanced decorating techniques and more complex preparations of pastry, confections, and dessert products. Students will also be introduced to candy, pastillage, sugar, and chocolate work.

Corequisite(s):
FOSM 1130
Prerequisite(s):
FOSM 1130
Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

If FOSM 1130 not previously taken, must be taken as a co-requisite.
FOSM Majors Only.

Pastries & Confections Laboratory
2
CH(s)

This course is an advanced pastry course where students will refine sills for more complex and intricate preparations of pastry, confections, and dessert products. Students will also be introduced to candy, sugar, and chocolate work. 

Corequisite(s):
FOSM 2232
Prerequisite(s):
FOSM 1130, FOSM 1131
Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

FOSM majors only

Tortes and Specialty Cakes
1
CH(s)

This course will study design and structure of tiered, carved and other specialty cakes and tortes. Students will practice designing their own tortes and cakes while applying principles related to structure and flavor profiles. Student will learn about the properties of advanced cake decorating products such as fondant, gumpaste, and pastillage. Business aspects such as labor costs and pricing will be discussed. 

Corequisite(s):
FOSM 2241
Prerequisite(s):
FOSM 1130, FOSM 1131
Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

FOSM majors only

Tortes and Specialty Cakes Laboratory
2
CH(s)

This course will primarily focus on torte and cake production with an emphasis on presentation. Students will apply skills acquired in FOSM 2241 to execute the tortes, gateau, and specialty cakes of their own design. This class will provide students with the opportunity to develop their piping skills as well as provide an introduction to advanced cake decorating products such as fondant and gum paste. 

Corequisite(s):
FOSM 2240
Prerequisite(s):
FOSM 1130, FOSM 1131
Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

FOSM majors only

Applications in Community & Medical Nutrition
3
CH(s)

This course will provide students with methods and practices necessary to access nutritional needs in client-oriented dietetic systems and community-oriented nutrition programs. Students will apply nutrition knowledge to the following: patient education, screening for nutritional risk, determining nutrient requirements across the lifespan, translating nutritional needs into food and menu choices, calculating body composition, and calculating diets for specific health conditions.

Prerequisite(s):
FOSM 2220
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Management & Regulation in Child Nutrition Programs in Schools
3
CH(s)

This course will provide knowledge and application practices related to management principles, regulatory requirements, best practices, and current issues related to school nutrition programs. The following aspects of school nutrition program management will be covered: menu planning, procurement, financial management and accountability, food production, record keeping, food safety, training and nutrition education. Management practices will be incorporated throughout the class.

Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

Prerequisite(s):  Successful completion of a 4-day seminar session provided by the WVDE is required as a prerequisite to enrollment. Seminar sessions will consist of lectures and program applications delivered by state-level coordinators, topical concurrent sessions related to course outcomes, activities and resources. Students will fulfill remaining course requirements through on-site application assignments.

Seminar in Dietary Management
1
CH(s)

This course will focus on the dietary management profession by looking at legal issues, professionalism, certification and licensing, preparation of resume, etc.

Other Info:
PR: Instructor Approval Required, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Guided Experience II
1-4
CH(s)

This course will be an advanced guided experience for community college students to explore topics of interest in their field through research, field experience, presentation, computer applications, lab experience, or other project agreed upon between the student and the supervising faculty and is submitted to the dean in a written contract.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s), PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:

Credits earned may be applied as free electives in degree or certificate programs.

Special Topics in Food Service
0-4
CH(s)

This course will provide an opportunity for students to further their study of principles and concepts in the field and to apply their knowledge in a variety of application both in the traditional classroom setting and in work/job related experiences. The class will be an individualized, arranged course, with learning outcomes determined by the instructor in consultation with the student and permission of the School Dean.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s)
Note:
  • Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 2299 Special Topics designation. 
  • Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course. 
Food Service Practicum
2
CH(s)

A supervised work experience conducted in an assigned food service operation.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s)
Note:
  • Course may be repeated for up to 15 hours of credit based on FOSM emphasis area.
  • Capstone Course.

French

Elementary French I
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

This introductory course covers pronunciation, oral comprehension and speaking, reading and written drill and composition and elements of grammar. 

Note:

Laboratory.

Elementary French II
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

Continuation of 1101, completing the basic grammatical principles. 

Prerequisite(s):
FREN 1101
Intermediate French I
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

A course designed to reinforce and increase knowledge of vocabulary and grammar. The course consists of extensive reading, review of grammar and continued attention to pronunciation and speaking. Engaging reading materials, such as short stories, are emphasized.

Prerequisite(s):
FREN 1102
Note:

Laboratory. 

Intermediate French II
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

The continuation of FREN 2201.

Prerequisite(s):
FREN 2201

Geography

Introduction to Geography
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

An introduction to the physical and cultural elements of geography, with a study of major geographical regions of the world.

Geology

Physical Geology
4
CH(s)
S-FSU

This course is an introductory study of the materials, structures and forces in the earth. Topics include weathering, hydrology, glaciers, earthquakes, landslides, and volcanoes; students will also examine the physical and chemical processes that contribute to the earth’s changing form and shape. Both surface and internal processes are covered, with emphasis on the interaction between these processes, including the theory of plate tectonics.

Note:
  • Three hours of lecture and two hours of lab per week.
  • Lab includes field trips.
Historical Geology
4
CH(s)
S-FSU

An introduction to the history of the earth from its origins to the present day. The evolution of the earth’s oceans, ocean basins, atmosphere and life forms are also studied. The study of past life and continental position in geologic time is based on the interpretation of fossils, rocks, continental drift and plate tectonics. 

Prerequisite(s):
GEOL 1101
Note:
  • Three hours of lecture and two hours of lab per week.
  • Lab includes field trips.
Introduction to Environmental Geology
4
CH(s)
S-FSU

This course explores the practical application of elementary geologic principles to everyday environmental problems. It also covers hazardous earth processes, including landslides, volcanoes, and earthquakes, as well as geologic aspects of human-induced problems such as mining, mineral production, subterranean waste disposal, and water and land use. 

Prerequisite(s):
GEOL 1101
Note:
  • Three hours of lecture and two hours of lab per week.
  • Lab includes field trips.

History

World Civilizations I
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

An intermediate-level survey of worldwide historical developments, emphasizing major civilizations in prehistoric times, ancient empires and the early Middle Ages. 

Note:

Recommended for sophomores and well-prepared freshmen.

World Civilizations II
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

An intermediate-level survey of worldwide historical developments, emphasizing major civilizations from the Middle Ages to the social, political, and industrial revolutions of the eighteenth century.

Note:

Recommended for sophomores and well-prepared freshmen.

World Civilizations III
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

An intermediate-level survey of worldwide historical developments from the French Revolution of 1789 to the present era, emphasizing major civilizations and the modern growth of global interdependence.

Note:

Recommended for sophomores and well-prepared freshmen.

United States History I
3
CH(s)

Examines the major developments in American history, from pre-Columbian Native American cultures to the end of the Civil War, with emphasis on the Colonial, Revolutionary, Early Republic and Civil War eras.

United States History II
3
CH(s)

Examines the major developments in American history, from Reconstruction to the present with emphasis on the political, social, cultural, economic and diplomatic forces that contributed to America’s emergence as the world’s leading industrial democracy.

Health Careers

Medical Terminology
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course is a study of the structure of medical words and terms. Emphasis is placed on spelling and defining commonly used prefixes, suffixes, root words, and their combining forms. Anatomy and physiology terms as they relate to the root words, combining forms, prefixes, and suffixes are stressed. Terminology and medical abbreviations relating to several allied health occupations acquaints students with an overview of the medical language.

Note:

This course is offered as an online course as well as the traditional classroom.

Introduction to Health Careers Programs
1
CH(s)

This course is designed to introduce students to the health careers degree and certificate programs offered at Pierpont C&TC. A case study approach may be used to examine various fields in health careers. This course will cover requirements and prerequisites, necessary skills and qualities for successful program completion, and provide individualized exposure to selected occupations. 

Note:

This course is offered on a credit/non-credit basis and can be used as an elective.

Pathophysiology of Diseases
3
CH(s)

Study of the disease process, terminology and association with the body structure.

Prerequisite(s):
HLCA 1100, HLCA 1170, HLCA 1171
Note:
  • Fall Semester: Fairmont Campus. Spring Semester: Caperton Center.
  • This course is offered as an online course as well as the traditional classroom.
Phlebotomy Theory
1
CH(s)

The course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of professionalism, credentialing, the importance of consent and confidentiality, safety issues, infection control and the overall structure of a typical hospital. Students will learn basic techniques of venipuncture and capillary puncture through lecture videos, class activities and demonstration. 

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

MLT or Lab Assistant majors only.

Basic Clinical and Laboratory Skills
4
CH(s)

This course in the theory and practice of basic laboratory and clinical skills is designed to provide the student with entry level knowledge needed to pursue a career path as a laboratory assistant and/or phlebotomy technician. Students are introduced to professionalism, the importance of consent and confidentiality safety issues, CPR and vital signs, infection control and basic laboratory techniques including specimen collection and venipuncture.

Note:

3 hours of lecture per week and 1 hour of lab. 

Electrocardiography Technology
3
CH(s)

This course will provide specific knowledge of the anatomy of the heart, the electrical conduction system of the heart, identification of normal heart rhythms and arrhythmias, how to maintain electrocardiography equipment, medications and laboratory values as they relate to heart rhythms, and the indications for an electrocardiogram, Holter monitor, and stress testing.

Corequisite(s):
HLCA 1151, HLCA 1152
Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

Health Science major only

Electrocardiograph Technology Lab
1
CH(s)

This course is designed to provide hands on instruction and give students the experience needed to perform electrocardiograms for adults and pediatric patients, understand Holter monitors, patient monitoring during stress testing procedures, response in emergency situations, and equipment troubleshooting and maintenance.

Corequisite(s):
HLCA 1150, HLCA 1152
Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

Health Science major only

Human Anatomy and Physiology
3
CH(s)

A single semester examination of the architecture and function of cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems of the human being. This examination will include an intensive and detailed study of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, lymphatic, digestive, respiratory, urinary, nervous, reproductive, and endocrine systems as well as their interactions with each other. 

Note:

Three hours lecture per week.

Human Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory
1
CH(s)

Complementary to HLCA 1170, the laboratory focuses on the anatomical study of the human form, including microscopic examination of cells and tissues, and gross examination of organs and organ systems (skeleton, muscles, blood vessels, nerves, and internal organs). Physiological exercises are also included, such as real-time examination of electrocardiograms, heart sounds, peripheral circulation, blood pressure, reflexes, electromyograms, electroencephalograms, lung volume, and breathing patterns, to supplement the material covered in HLCA 1170. 

Corequisite(s):
HLCA 1170
Prerequisite(s):
HLCA 1170
Other Info:
At least one listed Prerequisite/Co-requisite Required
Guided Experience I VAR
1-4
CH(s)

This course will be a guided experience for community college students to explore topics of interest in their field through research, field experience, presentation, computer applications, lab experience, or other project agreed upon between the student and the supervising faculty and is submitted to the dean in a written contract. 

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s), PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:

Credits earned may be applied as free electives in degree or certificate programs. 

Special Topics in Health Careers
0-4
CH(s)

Studies in special selected topics, to be determined by the instructor and approved by the School Dean.  

Note:
  • Credits earned will be applicable as free electives in associate and certificate of applied science degree programs. 
  • Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 1199 Special Topics designation. 
  • Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course.   
Health Assessment and Physical Examination
3
CH(s)
This is an introductory health assessment and physical examination course designed for students seeking careers in the field of healthcare. Students will be introduced to the skills of history taking, physical assessment and documentation required for practice in the field of healthcare. The student will become familiar with the techniques of physical assessment consisting of inspection, palpation, percussion and auscultation. The student will acquire needed skills to conduct comprehensive health assessment including the physical, psychological, social, functional and 222 environmental aspects of health. Integrated in this is the collection and analysis of data which are essential in planning safe and effective care. Emphasis is placed on health assessment as a systematic and organized examination.
Prerequisite(s):
HLCA 1170, HLCA 1100
Phlebotomy Practicum
2
CH(s)

This course is designed to provide the student with practical experience in blood drawing techniques. Students will spend about 6 to 8 hours in student laboratories practicing phlebotomy techniques on model arms and on volunteers prior to being placed in clinical facilities. Students will be expected to obtain up to 100 venipunctures and 10 capillary sticks and must schedule sufficient time to accomplish this at the clinical facility. 

Prerequisite(s):
HLCA 1105
Other Info:
PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:
  • Hours at clinical facilities will vary throughout the day.
  • 85 hours minimum.
  • On-line assessment and final.
Bioethics
3
CH(s)
This course is an introductory survey of bioethics and healthcare law. Students will understand basic laws of healthcare. Students will explore basic ethical concepts, theories, and principles and morality. Developing moral reasoning skills will be emphasized as students critically examine, analyze and discuss several moral-ethical dilemmas in health care practice or public policy.
Prerequisite(s):
ENGL 1104
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

crosslinked with HUMN 2210 Bioethics

Guided Experience II VAR
1-4
CH(s)

This course will be an advanced guided experience for community college students to explore topics of interest in their field through research, field experience, presentation, computer applications, lab experience, or other project agreed upon between the student and the supervising faculty and is submitted to the dean in a written contract.

Other Info:
PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:
  • Credits earned may be applied as free electives in degree or certificate programs.
  • May be repeated for up to 4 hours.
Special Topics in Health Careers
0-4
CH(s)

This course will provide an opportunity for students to further their study of principles and concepts in the field and to apply their knowledge in a variety of application both in the traditional classroom setting and in work/job related experiences. The class will be an individualized, arranged course, with learning outcomes determined by the instructor in consultation with the student and permission of the School Dean. 

Note:
  • Credits earned may be applied as free electives in degree or certificate programs.
  • May be repeated for up to 4 hours.
Introduction to Medical Administrative Assistant
3
CH(s)

Introduction to Medical Administrative Assistant will give you the foundation for operating a medical office. This course will teach you the fundamental aspects of patient registration and scheduling, basic coding, and the fundamentals of billing, insurance plans, and reimbursement for a medical office. This course is not intended to teach you how to be an expert coder and/or biller.

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

Medical Administrative Assistant Skill Set students only.

Medical Coding
1
CH(s)

In this course, students will study the principles of coding, specific coding guidelines and conventions for diagnoses and procedures, including the importance of clinical documentation. Emphasis would also be placed on the interpretation of coding guidelines for accurate code assignment. 

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:
MEDICAL ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT SKILL SET and AAS in Health Sciences majors with permission of instructor. 
Pharmacology
2
CH(s)
Bioethics
3
CH(s)
This course is an introductory survey of bioethics and healthcare law. Students will understand basic laws of healthcare. Students will explore basic ethical concepts, theories, and principles and morality. Developing moral reasoning skills will be emphasized as students critically examine, analyze and discuss several moral-ethical dilemmas in health care practice or public policy.
Prerequisite(s):
ENGL 1104
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

crosslinked with HLCA 2210 Bioethics

Physics for Health Careers
3
CH(s)

This course is designed to introduce pre-physical therapist assistant and pre-radiology students to basic physics concepts including motion, forces, energy, heat, sound, electricity, light, and radioactivity. 

Note:

The class will include on-line activities and in-class activities.

Electrocardiography Technology Practicum
1
CH(s)

This course will prepare students for their role as Electrocardiograph Technicians. Students will demonstrate professionalism, professional communication, and adhere to health care policies and procedures in a clinical setting. Students are required to complete at least 40 hours of clinical training, completion of ten (10) electrocardiograms performed at a clinical site, and observation of Holter monitoring and cardiac stress testing. Hours may vary depending on clinical site.

Corequisite(s):
HLCA 1150, HLCA 1151
Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

Health Science major only

Health Information Technology

Interpretation of Diagnostic Data
3
CH(s)

This course is designed to introduce the health information specialist to the relationship between diseases, laboratory tests and drugs within the health record. This knowledge base will be useful in optimizing reimbursement. 

Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

Health Information Technology Majors only.

Fundamentals of Health Information
3
CH(s)

This course serves as an introduction to the function and duties of health information professionals. Various health care delivery and settings in the United States will be discussed. The student will be introduced to the various career opportunities available for health information professionals. In addition, the different types of patient records, storage systems, filing systems and numbering systems will be discussed. Students will be educated in the different indexes, registers, and the overall health data collection. 

Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

Health Information Technology Majors only.

Fundamentals of Health Information Lab
1
CH(s)

This laboratory course serves to enhance the didactics that are covered in the lecture for Fundamentals of Health Information. The Health Information Technology student will be expected to complete a series of hands-on projects that are compatible with the information from the classroom. 

Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

Health Information Technology Majors only.

Health Information Community Service
1
CH(s)

This course is an introduction to the Health Information profession through community service. Each student is expected to complete thirty (30) hours of volunteer work in a health information environment. Placement will depend on the needs of the facilities at the time.

Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

Health Information Technology Majors only.

Computers in Health Care
3
CH(s)

This course will introduce the Health Information Technology student to computers in the health care arena. 

Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

Health Information Technology Majors only.

Health Care Statistics
3
CH(s)

Hospital statistics is a course in which the methods of computing statistics of health care institutions and storage areas for this material will be discussed. Basic statistics applicable in health care institutions will be introduced. The course will include the study of vital and public health statistics, review of simple arithmetic principles as warranted, in depth study of hospital statistics; sources, definitions, collection, reporting, presentation and analysis of data, sources and uses of health data in the United States.

Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:
  • Applicable statistical software will be utilized. 
  • Health Information Technology Majors only.
Legal and Ethical Aspects of Health Information
3
CH(s)

This course is designed to instruct the student in the basic legal principles, release of confidential health information, court procedures and conduct, and association with legal authorities. HIPAA rules and regulations will be discussed. Legal and ethical issues of the profession will be covered as well as ethical issues in the health care field.

Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

Health Information Technology Majors only.

Alternate Care Settings
2
CH(s)

Alternative Care Settings will expose the HIT student to a variety of non-traditional settings for health information management. The students will be expected to rotate through various types of settings (i.e., psychiatric facility, rehabilitation hospital, nursing home, home health agency, hospice, prison system, health clinic and a physicians’ office or clinic.)

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:
  • Placement depends on the availability of a particular facility.
  • The student will be required to be at the clinical affiliate a total of 60 hours.
  • This course will be offered during the first summer session.
  • Health Information Technology Majors only.
Special Topics: Medical Admin Assistant
3
CH(s)

Studies in special selected topics, to be determined by the instructor and approved by the School Dean.  Credits earned will be applicable as free electives in associate and certificate of applied science degree programs.

Note:
  • Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 1199 Special Topics designation. 
  • Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course.   
Reimbursement Systems
2
CH(s)

This course will examine reimbursement methodologies for various health care entities. Students will learn how to compare claims submitted to third party payers with actual reimbursement received. 

Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

Health Information Technology Majors only.

Quality Assessment/Utilization Review
3
CH(s)

This course is designed to provide the student with the theoretical knowledge and technical skills relative to the operation of a quality assessment and utilization management program within a health care facility. The influence of government regulations and accrediting agency standards will be introduced.

Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

Health Information Technology Majors only.

Classification Systems I - ICD
5
CH(s)

This course is designed to emphasize the history and development of disease classifications. The student will spend time learning the procedures of various systems. Application of the current classification system will be emphasized. Prepared software will be used to enhance the understanding of the current classification system. Financial implications of the classification system will be discussed.

Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:
  • Four hour lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
  • Health Information Technology Majors only.
Clinical Practicum I
2
CH(s)

Students in this course will analyze, number, file, retrieve, transcribe, and prepare statistical reports. The student will be working with coding and abstracting of disease/procedure entities. This clinical practicum will take place in a health care facility. 

Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:
  • Students will be expected to be at a clinical site 120 hours. 
  • Health Information Technology Majors only.
Health Information Supervision
3
CH(s)

Current standards of health care are presented; JCAHO and State Licensure.

Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

Health Information Technology Majors only.

Clinical Practicum II
2
CH(s)

This is a four credit, three consecutive week course requiring 40 hours of clinical practicum per week. 

Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:
  • The student will be provided opportunity to practice all skills acquired thus far in the two-year program.
  • Students will be expected to be at a clinical site 120 hours. 
  • Health Information Technology Majors only.
Classification Systems II - CPT
5
CH(s)

This course is designed to introduce the student to the current use of CPT-Coding classification. Various situations for this use will be utilized including: physician’s office, outpatient, and ambulatory care settings. 

Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

Health Information Technology Majors only.

Special Topics in Health Information Technology
0-4
CH(s)

This course will provide an opportunity for students to further their study of principles and concepts in the field and to apply their knowledge in a variety of application both in the traditional classroom setting and in work/job related experiences. The class will be an individualized, arranged course, with learning outcomes determined by the instructor in consultation with the student and permission of the School Dean. 

Note:
  • Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 2299 Special Topics designation. 
  • Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course.  
Health Information Technology Capstone
2
CH(s)

This course is designed to incorporate all HIT program coursework into an integrated course. The student’s didactic knowledge will be blended with their clinical experiences. Guest lecturers, field trips, computer and CD assignments will be used as a teaching tool. This course will also focus on the health information profession by looking at legal issues, professionalism, certification, preparation of a resume, etc.

Note:
  • Health Information Technology Majors only.
  • Capstone course.

Health Education

Healthcare Management Capstone
2
CH(s)
This course is a comprehensive review of Healthcare Management. Topics include budgeting and finance, professional development/communication, regulatory compliance, infection control and human resources. This course builds on all previous course concepts, and provides the opportunity to integrate and synthesize the knowledge and skills acquired throughout their course work.
Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:
Health Science Majors only
Personal Health
2
CH(s)
S-FSU

This course examines the meaning and significance of the physical, mental, social and environmental factors of health and safety as related to the individual and to society. Students will focus on important phases of related national problems, with an emphasis on college students and their current needs.

Introduction to Health
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

This course is an in-depth study of several content areas relating to health, contemporary health problems and reciprocal relationships involving man, disease and the environment. Students will explore the significance of the physical, mental, social, and environmental factors of health and safety as related to the individual and to society.

Honors

Honors Seminar
1
CH(s)

This seminar introduces students to critical thinking in a number of disciplines and initiates them into the standards required by the Honors Program.

Human Services

Freshman Seminar
3
CH(s)

This course is designed to acquaint entering freshmen with various academic, economic, and social aspects of college life and to teach students the skills necessary to succeed in college. In addition, this course would focus on building genuine relationships with people on campus by providing opportunities to engage in various college activities and to work with a Freshman Seminar facilitator, peer leaders and mentors.

Exploring Career Opportunities
1
CH(s)

This is a one credit hour, interactive, distance learning survey “survival” course to explore possibilities and plan for career changes and updates. It is self-paced and intended to aid in developing or refreshing skills needed to launch or transition into a new career. Career resources will be explored and then applied to real-world experiences. This course should assist students seeking a new or renewed career path. 

Community Service Learning
1
CH(s)
S-FSU

Community Service Learning provides opportunities for students to perform meaningful service to the community while engaging in conscious reflection and critical analysis activities which meet service learning objectives. Students are required to complete a minimum of 20 hours of quality service for a non-profit agency. The hours are completed over the course of the semester with credit given for 2 hours a week. The course is based upon an experiential learning format which includes the college, the student, and the community.

Note:
  • Students may enroll in Community Service Learning three semesters, completing a total of 3 credit hours toward graduation requirements.
  • Three sections of Community Service Learning are offered.
  • Enrollment in the general section does not require instructor permission; however, enrollment in the honor’s section and the America Reads and Counts’ sections do require instructor permission.
Exploring Career Opportunities
0-4
CH(s)

Studies in special selected topics, to be determined by the instructor and approved by the School Dean. 

Note:
  • Credits earned will be applicable as free electives in associate and certificate of applied science degree programs. 
  • Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 1199 Special Topics designation. 
  • Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course.   

Humanities

Bridging Cultures: Work & Identity in a Global Workplace
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

Upon successful completion of this course, students will demonstrate through written and oral communication an understanding of the connections between work and identity in a global context. Students will learn to use the literature of meaningful work as a bridge to cultural identity. To develop a global understanding of work-related issues, students will move from a narrow, local framework emphasizing WV industries to a national and global context, including, but not limited to Chinese and Sub-Saharan African literature. Since students should be able to explore the impact of diversity on their career choices, the course will build community and bridge cultures by using labor as the connective tissue. This course will meet Pierpont’s General Education criteria of oral and written communication, critical thinking, professionalism, as well as globalism, and will serve as a General education elective.

Prerequisite(s):
ENGL 1104
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required

Information Systems

Guided Experience I
1-4
CH(s)

This course will be a guided experience for community college students to explore topics of interest in their field through research, field experience, presentation, computer applications, lab experience, or other project agreed upon between the student and the supervising faculty and is submitted to the dean in a written contract.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s), PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:

Credits earned may be applied as free electives in degree or certificate programs. 

Special Topics in Information Systems
0-4
CH(s)
S-PCTC

Studies in special selected topics, to be determined by the instructor and approved by the School Dean.  Credits earned will be applicable as free electives in associate and certificate of applied science degree programs.  

Note:
  • Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 1199 Special Topics designation. 
  • Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course.   
Fundamentals of Information Systems
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

The course is an introduction to basic business information systems, including networking, systems analysis and design.

Prerequisite(s):
OFAD 1150, COMP 1100
Other Info:
At least one listed Prerequisite/Co-requisite Required
Information Technology: Hardware and Operating Systems
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course provides the hardware and operating system concepts necessary for system design. System architecture and operating systems are considered for single- and multi-user computer systems.

Advanced Hardware & Operating Systems
3
CH(s)

This course is a continuation of INFO 2205, Information Technology - Hardware and Operating Systems. The course content covers advanced hardware and operating system troubleshooting as well as computer configuration. PR INFO 2205, grade of C or higher.

Prerequisite(s):
INFO 2205
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Windows Server Installation and Maintenance
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course will provide students with knowledge and skills necessary to install and configure a Windows Server and applications such as DNS, web server, Telnet Server, FTP server, SSH server, and Mail Server. Students will learn to manage user and group accounts and to configure an active directory.

Prerequisite(s):
INFO 2205, INFO 2250
Virtualization Environments
3
CH(s)

This course will introduce students to the concepts and practices of computer virtualization, especially in the context of enterprise datacenter virtualization, virtual machine storage, virtual networking and access control. Upon completion, students should be able to perform tasks related to installation, configuration and management of virtual machines. 

Prerequisite(s):
INFO 2206, INFO 2207
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
PR:
  • INFO 2206 C or higher
  • INFO 2207 C or higher
Fundamentals of Web Design
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

Introduction to Web Design course focusing on the overall web site production processes with particular emphasis on design elements involving layout, navigation, and interactivity.

Fundamentals of Linux
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC
Students learn the fundamentals of how to install, configure, and use the Linux operating system; how to use command line and graphic interfaces to perform common network tasks; how to configure system features and services (e.g web services, DHCP, FTP, and network); and how to use basic troubleshooting tools and techniques to solve system issues.
 
PR: Grade of “C” or better in INFO 2205.
Prerequisite(s):
INFO 2205
Programming, Data & File Structures
3
CH(s)

This course provides familiarity with hardware and software concepts and an introduction to the Visual BASIC programming language. Several short programming projects are assigned to provide the students with experience in program development. This course may not be substituted for either COMP 1100. 

 

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1207
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
PR:
  • MTH 1201 or
  • MTH 1207 or
  • MATH ACT score of 19 or
  • COMPASS Algebra score of 36 or
  • ACCUPLACER Elementary Algebra score of 76
Networking Fundamentals
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course provides an in-depth knowledge of data communications and networking requirements, including networking and telecommunications technologies, hardware and software. Students will explore the analysis and design of networking applications in organizations. Management of telecommunications networks and evaluation of connectivity options are also covered. Students learn to evaluate, select and implement different communication options within an organization.

Corequisite(s):
OFAD 1150
Prerequisite(s):
OFAD 1150
Other Info:
At least one listed Prerequisite/Co-requisite Required
Note:

The course consists of two hours of lecture and two hours of lab per week. 

Router Theory and Router Technologies
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course examines the theory and technology of routers, including router programming, configuration and protocols. 

Prerequisite(s):
INFO 2250
Other Info:
At least one listed Prerequisite/Co-requisite Required
Note:

The course consists of two hours of lecture and two hours of lab per week.

Advanced Routing and Switching
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course covers advanced routing and switching concepts. It is a continuation of INFO 2251. 

Prerequisite(s):
INFO 2251
Note:

The course consists of two hours of lecture and two hours of lab per week.

Project-Based Learning
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course covers advanced Wide Area Network technologies. It is a continuation of INFO 2252.

Prerequisite(s):
INFO 2252
Note:

The course consists of two hours of lecture and two hours of lab per week.

Information Security
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course will provide a foundation for understanding the key issues important in maintaining information CIA (Confidentiality, Integrity, Availability) in a business environment. The course covers fundamental theories as well as the practical skills. Students will learn security management and technical components of information security. They will be exposed to a wide spectrum of security activities, methods, methodologies, and procedures. 

Prerequisite(s):
INFO 2205, INFO 2250
Network Security Essentials
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

Students develop fundamental knowledge of network security principles and commonly used network security tolls, and firewall configuration. Before taking this course, students must have the pre-requisite knowledge of local area and wide area network communications, including advance routing and switching. The following core network security concepts are covered: network security threats, firewall technology, intrusion detection, and prevention systems, and virtual private network implementation.

Prerequisite(s):
INFO 2205, INFO 2250, INFO 2256
Note:

PR: “C” or higher in INFO 2252 and “C” or higher in INFO 2256.

Guided Experience II
1-4
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course will be an advanced guided experience for community college students to explore topics of interest in their field through research, field experience, presentation, computer applications, lab experience, or other project agreed upon between the student and the supervising faculty and is submitted to the dean in a written contract.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s), PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:

Credits earned may be applied as free electives in degree or certificate programs.

Professional Internship and Portfolio Development
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

The purpose of this course is to allow students to bring business topics into focus by using all their collected business knowledge. This will be accomplished through completion of a portfolio that will demonstrate to prospective employers the student’s career preparation. The student will also be required to complete a professional internship in the workplace. The importance of career and goal planning will be emphasized. 

Other Info:
PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:
  • A total of 140 hours of supervised work will be required.
  • Capstone course.
Intrusion Detection/Prevention Systems Fundamentals
3
CH(s)

In this course, students gain a thorough grounding in the design, implementation, and administration of IDSes/IPSes, as well as practical, hands-on experience working with these systems. In addition, students analyze various attack signatures and the network traffic these systems collect. Intrusion Detection/Prevention Systems are critical components of well-designed network architectures. These systems act as a line of defense, helping protect company assets from attacks. 

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

PR: Admission to Cyber Security track

Windows Server System Administration
3
CH(s)

This course builds on Windows Server I: Installing and Configuring Windows Server by continuing to provide validation of skills necessary to implement a core Windows Server 2012 Infrastructure into an existing enterprise environment. Additionally, the course provides the broad-based knowledge necessary to prepare students for further study in other specialized Information Technology and security fields. 

Prerequisite(s):
INFO 2207
Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
PR:
  • Admission to Cyber Security track
  • Info 2207, grade of C or Higher
Network Security I: Network Security Fundamental
3
CH(s)
This course prepares students for entry-level security specialist careers by developing an in-depth understanding of network security principles and the tools and configurations needed to secure a network 
Prerequisite(s):
INFO 2207
Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
PR:
  • Cyber Security
  • INFO 2207, grade of C or Higher
Linux Server Administration
3
CH(s)

This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of system administration using Linux operating systems. Additionally, the course provides the broad-based knowledge necessary to prepare students for further study in other specialized security fields.

Prerequisite(s):
INFO 2230
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

PR: INFO 2230 Grade of C or Higher

Ethical Hacking & Systems Defense
3
CH(s)
The course combines an ethical hacking methodology with the hands-on application of security tools to better help students secure their systems. Students are introduced to common countermeasures that effectively reduce and/or mitigate attacks.
 
Prerequisite(s):
INFO 2300
Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

PR:

  • Cyber Security
  • INFO 2300
Professional Internship and Portfolio Development
3
CH(s)
The purpose of this course is to allow students to bring business topics into focus by using all their collected business knowledge. This will be accomplished through completion of a portfolio that will demonstrate to prospective employers the student’s career preparation. The student will also be required to complete a professional internship in the workplace. The importance of career and goal planning will be emphasized. A total of 140 hours of supervised work will be required. Capstone course.
Other Info:
PR: Instructor Approval Required

Interdisciplinary Studies

Experiencing the Arts
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

Introduction to appreciation of the arts through lectures/demonstrations by teachers in the visual arts, music and theatre. Organized thematically, the course offers an opportunity to explore relationships between various artistic media, as well as their relationships with other disciplines. The course will also consider the circumstances which have shaped these relationships and the ways in which contemporary culture conditions how we respond to and interpret art and performance today.

Women’s Studies Colloquium
1-3
CH(s)
S-FSU

The Women’s Studies Colloquium introduces students to issues and concerns surrounding women and women’s studies through talks by invited experts on a broad range of topics.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s)
Race, Class, Gender and Sexuality
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course examines the role and function of consumer and leisure life in the construction, interaction, and management of race, class, and gender identities within the United States. By identifying and analyzing how race, class, and gender positions inscribe and inform the values, ideas, and beliefs embodied by pop cultural productions and their consumption, students will learn to recognize and critique the politicized features that impact such everyday phenomena as TV shows, films, commercials, videogames, music videos, sports spectacles, magazine advertisements, fashion, toys, and the Internet. This course, therefore, will enable students to understand with greater clarity why we make the choices we do when acting as consumers of popular culture and how these choices reflect the race, class, and gender identities and values we knowingly or unknowingly ascribe to ourselves and others.

Prerequisite(s):
ENGL 1104
Note:

PR: ENGL 1104 (with a grade of a “C” or better).

Introduction to Women’s Studies
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

This interdisciplinary course focuses on a variety of topics in women’s studies, such as gender and science, the body, reproductive technologies, public policy and feminist theory. Class discussions will examine positions among feminist ethicists on the implications of gender definition and explore the construction of gender in our society.

Empowering Leadership
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

The purpose of this course is to help prepare students to assume increasingly responsible leadership roles of empowerment in their personal, professional and academic lives. This interdisciplinary, student-centered course focuses not only on significant theories of empowering leadership and their applicability to leaders of the past and present, but also includes substantial hands-on, experiential learning opportunities in which students practice empowering leadership. 

Prerequisite(s):
ENGL 1104
Note:

PR: ENGL 1104 (with a grade of a “C” or better).

Great Ideas of Leaders
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This interdisciplinary humanities course explores some of the most significant ideas of leaders and the questions they have posed to humankind. Topics include the intersection of leadership with the heroic myth, the nature of government, justice, wealth, culture, the mind, poetics, ethics, good and evil, power and authority, concepts of nature, issues of faith and values-based leadership. 

Interdisciplinary Practicum
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course will provide opportunities to observe and interact in appropriate work environments at specific sites in each of the core disciplines: Aviation, Criminal Justice, EMS, and Safety. Sites to be included will be chosen by the program coordinators of the various disciplines, and may vary from time to time. 

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:
  • PR: Major in Homeland Security or Pre-Homeland Security.
  • Required core class for the Homeland Security Degree Program.
  • Capstone course.

Italian

Elementary Italian I
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

Italian I is designed for students who have no previous instruction in Italian. The course focuses on enabling students to communicate effectively in Italian and to develop an appreciation of the Italian culture.

Elementary Italian II
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

Italian II is a continuation of Italian I, completing the basic grammatical principles of that language and concentrating on enabling students to speak in formal and informal contexts.

Intermediate Italian I
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

This course focuses on enabling students to communicate effectively in Italian, by consolidating and expanding the vocabulary and grammar they learned in Italian 1101 and 1102, as well as introducing more sophisticated grammatical structures. The course emphasizes language as a means of understanding culture in the increasingly global world. The course also seeks a heightened understanding of everyday Italian life. The course will be taught in Italian. 

Prerequisite(s):
ITAL 1102
Intermediate Italian II
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

This course is a continuation of Italian 2201. Students actively use language and conversational skills acquired in 2201 as they examine Italian housing, environment, music, theater, art, and literature. The course will be taught in Italian.

Prerequisite(s):
ITAL 2201

Interpreter Training Program

American Sign Language V
3
CH(s)

In this course the primary emphasis is placed on the advanced development of ASL expressive and receptive skills. The language in a natural context using the proper expressions and grammatical structures will be applied. Phrasal vocabulary and components of storytelling will be introduced.

Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

ITTP Majors only.

Sign-to-Voice Interpreting I
3
CH(s)

An introductory course designed to provide the development of skills receptively while expressing an equivalent message in spoken English. Focus is placed on the interpreting process, appropriate English word choices, vocal inflection, and English structure. 

Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

ITTP Majors only.

Voice-to-Sign Interpreting I
3
CH(s)

An introductory course that provides students with an overview of the field of interpreting and the processes involved. The student will learn the components of communication, culture, community and how it applies to rendering a signed message and interpreting. 

Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

ITTP Majors only.

Simultaneous and Consecutive Interpreting
3
CH(s)

Students will use hands - on approach in this course to develop skills and proper execution in simultaneous and consecutive styles of interpreting. Students will learn to think analytically and to apply this skill to “real life” situations increasing speed accuracy and complexity of the interpreting process. Topics will include hospitality, social welfare, housing, education, paralegal, and medical scenarios. Videotaping will be used to evaluate skill and provide feedback. 

Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

ITTP Majors only.

American Sign Language VI
3
CH(s)

This course will continue to develop expressive and receptive ASL skills and the language in its natural context along with full body expressions.

Prerequisite(s):
ITTP 2200
Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

ITTP Majors only.

Sign-to-Voice Interpreting II
3
CH(s)

A continuation of Sign-to-Voice Interpreting I with more emphasis placed on advanced receptive skills, word choices, vocal inflection, and ability to interpret signed messages using appropriate English structure. 

Prerequisite(s):
ITTP 2201
Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

ITTP Majors only.

Voice-to-Sign Interpreting II
3
CH(s)

This course continues to increase knowledge and skills in the English/ASL interpretation process. Students will explore the dynamics of ASL structure, the history of interpreting, and will develop a resume and personal portfolio.

Prerequisite(s):
ITTP 2202
Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

ITTP Majors only.

Legal and Ethical Aspects of Interpreting
1
CH(s)

This course is designed to guide students into making ethical decisions in interpreting situations by using the RID Code of Ethics. In-depth discussions will pertain to an analysis of professional ethics, confidentiality, legal liability and the role of the interpreter. 

Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

ITTP Majors only.

Educational Interpreting
3
CH(s)

This course is designed to explore the processes needed to interpret for K-12 Deaf or Hard of Hearing students. Topics include: Educational Interpreter Performance Assessment, the educational paraprofessional, and cognitive and language development. 

Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

ITTP Majors only.

Interpreting Observation
1
CH(s)

This practicum experience provides students with opportunities to observe and reflect on their content, professional, interpreting knowledge, skills and disposition in classroom settings at both schools for the deaf and mainstreamed programs. The practicum experience must be completed with a grade of at least a C before entering the second practicum required.

Prerequisite(s):
AMSL 1114
Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), At least one listed Prerequisite/Co-requisite Required
Note:

ASL/IEP majors only.

Interpreting as Private Practice
2
CH(s)

This course provides students with the opportunity to choose and work in “real life” interpreting situations and apply the concepts learned in the classroom to the actual setting.

Prerequisite(s):
ITTP 2200, ITTP 2201
Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:
  • Students will complete a minimum of 150 hours during the practicum and will be directly supervised by staff interpreters. 
  • ITTP Majors only. 
  • Capstone course.

Journalism

Communications in Society
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

Survey of mass media in a democratic society and an introduction to mass media as it pertains to our current life styles and the ways in which the media has developed over the decades. This course will look at traditional media as well as the growing trend of social media. Students will explore the various types of media from print to electronic. 

Prerequisite(s):
ENGL 1108
Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only
Note:

Writing Intensive course.

Laboratory Assistant

Special Topics in Laboratory Assistant
0-4
CH(s)

Studies in special selected topics, to be determined by the instructor and approved by the School Dean.  Credits earned will be applicable as free electives in associate and certificate of applied science degree programs.

Note:
  • Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 1199 Special Topics designation. 
  • Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course.   
Advanced Lab Skills Theory
2
CH(s)

This course is designed to provide the student with knowledge in advanced laboratory skills in preparation for employment or further education. Ethical considerations of patient and client information and customer service will be explored. Patient specimen collection and processing, as well as coding and reporting of results and quality assurance and quality control of work completed will be stressed. 

Corequisite(s):
LABA 2207
Prerequisite(s):
LABA 2207
Other Info:
PR: Instructor Approval Required, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), At least one listed Prerequisite/Co-requisite Required
Note:
  • Must have successfully completed or be currently enrolled in LABA 2207.
  • PR: Successful completion of HLCA 1110 or approval of instructor.
  • 2 hrs. lecture per week.
Advanced Lab Skills
1
CH(s)

This course is designed to provide the student with advanced laboratory experience and training in preparation for employment or further education. Ethical considerations of patient and client information and customer service will be explored. Patient specimen collection and processing, as well as coding and reporting of results and quality assurance and quality control of work completed will be stressed. 

Corequisite(s):
LABA 2206
Note:
  • Two hours of laboratory per week.
  • Capstone course.
Special Topics
0-4
CH(s)

This course will provide an opportunity for students to further their study of principles and concepts in the field and to apply their knowledge in a variety of application both in the traditional classroom setting and in work/job related experiences. The class will be an individualized, arranged course, with learning outcomes determined by the instructor in consultation with the student and permission of the School Dean.

Other Info:
PR: Instructor Approval Required, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), At least one listed Prerequisite/Co-requisite Required
Note:
  • Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 2299 Special Topics designation. 
  • Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course.  

Library Science

Library Materials for Children
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

A study of the philosophy and principles used in evaluating and selecting materials to enhance the curriculum for younger children, and designing educational lesson plans with library resources for children from birth through 11 years of age. Different types of library resources for children will be identified, and their roles in libraries and education explored.

Other Info:
PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:

Spring and summer semesters only. 

Licensed Practical Nursing Program

Fundamental Nursing I
3
CH(s)

Fundamental Nursing I introduces the student to concepts and theories basic to the art and science of nursing.  Students are introduced to the concepts of patient needs, safety, communication, teaching/learning, critical thinking, ethical-legal issues, cultural diversity, and the history of nursing.  The nursing process is introduced in this course as a method to assess, plan, implement, and evaluate patient care.  The role of the practical nurse as a member of the healthcare team is also emphasized in this course.

Corequisite(s):
LPNC 1103, LPNC 1105, LPNC 1107
Prerequisite(s):
HLCA 1170, HLCA 1171, MTH 1200
Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only
Note:
  • Structured college laboratory experiences provide the student with opportunity to practice technical skills prior to patient contact. 
  • This course introduces students to the basic skills of nursing; progressing from simple to complex. 
  • The clinical experience provides opportunity for each student to apply technical skills to the care of adults. 
  • Successful completion of all laboratory, theoretical, and clinical components are required to receive credit for this course.
  • PR: Admission to the LPN program, HLCA 1170, HLCA 1171, Math 1100 or higher.
Geriatric Nursing
2
CH(s)

Geriatric nursing introduces the theories and concepts of aging.  Students will be introduced to both the physiologic and psychological changes associated with aging.  Topics discussed include health promotion, meeting safety needs, self-perception, copying with aging, stress, end of life issues, sexuality and aging, nutritional needs, activity and exercise, rest and sleep patterns, and elimination.  The goal of this course is to give the beginning practical nurse a balanced perspective on the realities of aging and to broaden the nurse’s viewpoint regarding aging people so that their needs can be met in a compassionate, caring, and appropriate manner. 

Corequisite(s):
LPNC 1101, LPNC 1105, LPNC 1107
Prerequisite(s):
HLCA 1170, HLCA 1171, MTH 1200
Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only
Note:
  • Successful completion of all laboratory, theoretical, and clinical components are required to receive credit for this course.
  • PR: Admission to the LPN program, HLCA 1170, HLCA 1171, Math 1100 or higher.
Pharmacology I
1
CH(s)

This course focuses on the basic principles of pharmacology including drug regulations, drug action and interactions, drug metabolism, patient teaching, and the practical nurses role in medication administration.  Aspects of medication administration include introduction to common routes (topical, oral, intradermal, subcutaneous, intramuscular, and intravenous), safe and accurate dosage calculations.

Corequisite(s):
LPNC 1101, LPNC 1103, LPNC 1107
Prerequisite(s):
HLCA 1170, HLCA 1171, MTH 1200
Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only
Note:

PR: Admission to the LPN program, HLCA 1170, HLCA 1171, Math 1100 or higher.

Fundamentals/Geriatric Clinical Practice I
3
CH(s)

This introductory clinical practice course emphasizes basic nursing skills and application of the nursing process in meeting the needs of diverse patients across the lifespan.  Emphasis is placed on performing basic nursing skills, the formation of nurse-patient relationships, communication, data collections, documentation, and medication administration. 

Corequisite(s):
LPNC 1101, LPNC 1103, LPNC 1105
Prerequisite(s):
HLCA 1170, HLCA 1171, MTH 1200
Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only
Note:
  • Successful completion of all laboratory, theoretical, and clinical components are required to receive credit for this course.
  • PR: Admission to the LPN program, HLCA 1170, HLCA 1171, Math 1100 or higher.
Fundamental Nursing II
4
CH(s)

This course builds upon the theories and concepts introduced in Fundamental Nursing I.  Fundamentals Nursing II utilizes the nursing process in dealing with more complex health care problems.  Students will study fluid, electrolytes, and acid-base balance, wound care, respiratory care, and explore patient teaching. 

Prerequisite(s):
LPNC 1101, LPNC 1103, LPNC 1107
Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only
Note:
  • Structured college laboratory experiences provide the student with opportunity to practice technical skills prior to patient contact. 
  • The clinical experience provides opportunity for each student to apply technical skills to the care of adults.
  • Successful completion of all laboratory, theoretical, and clinical components are required to receive credit for this course.
Fundamental Nursing II/Social Science
1
CH(s)
Mental Health Nursing
3
CH(s)

This is an introductory course for the beginning health care student.  Emphasis is placed on understanding the reaction of self and others under stress and the prevention of mental illness.  Some of the topics covered include maladaptive behavior, anxiety, aggression, assertiveness, and mental mechanisms.  Specific information for helping people who are suffering from stress caused by death, pain, and sexual problems is included.  The two major problems in our society today, alcoholism and drug abuse are discussed in detail.

Prerequisite(s):
LPNC 1101, LPNC 1107
Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only
Note:
  • Successful completion of all laboratory, theoretical, and clinical components are required to receive credit for this course.
Pharmacology II
1
CH(s)

Students will build on skills and techniques learned in Pharmacology I.  Pharmacology II will introduce basic drug classifications, their therapeutic use and precautions related to their administration.

Corequisite(s):
LPNC 1110
Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1200, LPNC 1101, LPNC 1103, LPNC 1105, LPNC 1107
Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only
Maternal/Pediatric Nursing
4
CH(s)

Maternal nursing introduces the student to the study of the physiological and emotional aspects of pregnancy, including physical development of the fetus, the importance of prenatal care, common complications of pregnancy, the mechanism of labor and delivery of the infant, postpartum care of the mother and newborn and common complications of the postpartum mother and newborn. Pediatric nursing offers the basic concept of growth, development, and health supervision of the infant, toddler, preschooler, school age, and adolescent.  Included is the study of a comprehensive group of childhood illnesses with methods of diagnosis and treatment.

Corequisite(s):
LPNC 1121, LPNC 1123
Prerequisite(s):
LPNC 1101, LPNC 1105, LPNC 1110, LPNC 1115
Note:
  • Successful completion of all laboratory, theoretical, and clinical components are required to receive credit for this course. 
  • Summer Only. 
Maternal/Pediatric Clinical Practice
1
CH(s)

This clinical practice guides the student in the application of the concepts and skills learned in maternal/pediatric nursing theory.  Extending care to include the family is emphasized in this course. 

Corequisite(s):
LPNC 1120, LPNC 1123
Prerequisite(s):
LPNC 1101, LPNC 1105, LPNC 1110, LPNC 1115
Note:
  • Successful completion of all laboratory, theoretical, and clinical components are required to receive credit for this course. 
  • Summer Only. 
Nutrition
2
CH(s)

In this course, the student will learn the foundations of nutrition and diet therapy in health and illness across the lifespan.  Topics explored include basic principles of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins, minerals, digestion, absorption, and metabolism.

Corequisite(s):
LPNC 1120, LPNC 1121
Prerequisite(s):
LPNC 1101, LPNC 1105, LPNC 1110, LPNC 1115
Note:

Summer Only. 

Medical-Surgical/Social Science I
6
CH(s)

Medical-Surgical nursing introduces students to the psychosocial and physiological needs of adults.  This study will prepare the student to approach individual health problems, health care, and nursing with concern for the safety and welfare of those who need professional and competent care.  The course is presented in sections according to body systems and is taught through lecture, demonstration, and supervised clinical experiences. The nursing process, critical thinking and geriatric considerations are integrated throughout the course assisting the student to develop a detailed plan of care for the patient with a common, well-defined medical-surgical health problem.  Emphasis is placed on providing care to individuals undergoing surgery, patients with cancer, and common alterations in the respiratory system, cardiovascular system, endocrine system, reproductive system of both the male and female, and the urinary system.

Corequisite(s):
LPNC 1131
Prerequisite(s):
LPNC 1101, LPNC 1105, LPNC 1110, LPNC 1115
Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only
Note:
  •  Structured college laboratory experiences provide the student with opportunity to practice technical skills prior to patient contact. 
  • The clinical experience provides opportunity for each student to apply technical skills to the care of adults.
  • Successful completion of all laboratory, theoretical, and clinical components are required to receive credit for this course. 
Med-Surg/Social Science Clinical Practice I
3
CH(s)

This clinical practice guides the student in the application of the concepts and skills learned in Medical-Surgical/Social Science Nursing I theory.  Emphasize is placed on providing care to individuals undergoing surgery, patients with cancer, and common alterations in the respiratory system, cardiovascular system, endocrine system, reproductive system of both the male and female, and the urinary system.

Corequisite(s):
LPNC 1130
Prerequisite(s):
LPNC 1101, LPNC 1105, LPNC 1110, LPNC 1115
Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only
Note:

Successful completion of all laboratory, theoretical, and clinical components are required to receive credit for this course. 

Medical-Surgical/Social Science II
6
CH(s)

Medical/Surgical Nursing II is a continuation of Medical/Surgical Nursing I.  This study will prepare the student to approach individual health problems, health care, and nursing with concern for the safety and welfare of those who need professional and competent care.  The course is presented in sections according to body systems and is taught through lecture, demonstration, and supervised clinical experiences. The nursing process, critical thinking and geriatric considerations are integrated throughout the course assisting the student to develop a detailed plan of care for the patient with a common, well-defined medical-surgical health problem.  Emphasis is placed on providing care to individuals with disorders of the musculoskeletal system, gastrointestinal system, integumentary system, the neurological system, sensory system, immune system and the hematologic and lymphatic systems. 

Corequisite(s):
LPNC 1135
Prerequisite(s):
LPNC 1110, LPNC 1115, LPNC 1123, LPNC 1130, LPNC 1131
Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only
Note:
  • Structured college laboratory experiences provide the student with opportunity to practice technical skills prior to patient contact. 
  • The clinical experience provides opportunity for each student to apply technical skills to the care of adults.
  • Successful completion of all laboratory, theoretical, and clinical components are required to receive credit for this course. 
Med-Surg/Social Science Clinical Practice II
3
CH(s)

This clinical practice guides the student in the application of the concepts and skills learned in Medical-Surgical/Social Science Nursing II theory.  Emphasize is placed on providing care to individuals with disorders of the musculoskeletal system, gastrointestinal system, integumentary system, the neurological system, sensory system, immune system and the hematologic and lymphatic systems.

Corequisite(s):
LPNC 1134
Prerequisite(s):
LPNC 1110, LPNC 1115, LPNC 1123, LPNC 1130, LPNC 1131
Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only
Note:

Successful completion of all laboratory, theoretical, and clinical components are required to receive credit for this course. 

Manufacturing Engineering Technology

Materials and Processes
3
CH(s)

This course covers the scientific concepts underlying the basic, procurement, process, fabrication and finishing industries while studying the physical and chemical properties of the organic and inorganic materials utilized in today’s industrial complex.

Mechatronics

Computers for Technicians
3
CH(s)

This course will introduce the fundamentals of modern personal computer systems, including hardware, BIOS and drivers, operating systems, and application software. Formatting and partitioning of HDD’s, loading of operating systems, and then basic system updating and maintenance will be practiced. The binary and hexadecimal numbering systems will be introduced. A robotics module will introduce basic programming concepts.

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:
  • This course is open to Mechatronics, Power Plant Technology, and Electric Utility Technology majors only. Other students may be admitted with coordinator consent.
  • (Formerly BITS 1014)
Electronics
3
CH(s)

This course introduces active devices into DC and AC circuits. Semiconductor materials, pn junctions, diodes, BJT’s, FET’s, and more complex active devices such as operational amplifiers will be examined. Parameter measurements in normal and faulted circuits will be emphasized in order to further develop system troubleshooting competence. The fundamentals of digital circuit concepts will also be explored, including digital number systems, logic gates, and flip flops.

Prerequisite(s):
ENRG 1031
Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
  • This course is open to Applied Process Technology, Power Plant Technology, Electric Utility Technology, Mechatronics, or Petroleum Technology majors only.  Other students may be admitted with coordinator consent.
  • (Formerly BITS 2011)
Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC I)
3
CH(s)

This course will introduce the programmable logic controller, how it is structured and programmed, and how it is applied to control machine/process systems. Emphasis will be placed on learning the common instructions and symbols used in PLC programs and how to read and interpret these to determine faults in a malfunctioning system. Programmable logic controllers will be used to control various processes.

Prerequisite(s):
ENRG 1031
Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
  • This course is open to Mechatronics, Power Plant Technology, and Electric Utility Technology majors only. Other students may be admitted with coordinator consent.
  • (Formerly BITS 2012)
Fluids II
3
CH(s)

This course introduces electrical control of hydraulic and pneumatic systems. The concepts of pressure, force, and flow rates will be applied using pumps, valves, and actuators on a daily basis. Circuit building, parameter measurements, and a systems view will be emphasized to develop troubleshooting ability.

Prerequisite(s):
ENRG 1010
Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
  • This course is open to Mechatronics, Power Plant Technology, and Electric Utility Technology majors only. Other students may be admitted with coordinator consent.
  • (Formerly BITS 1022)
Instrumentation and Process Control
3
CH(s)

This course will explore various measuring, recording, and controlling devices and their application in industrial processes, along with the symbols and diagrams associated with process control. Processes involving pressure, level (fluid), and flow will be explored. Closed-loop PID controllers will be introduced.

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:
  • This course is open to Mechatronics, Power Plant Technology, and Electric Utility Technology majors only. 
  • Priority will be given to Mechatronics majors.
  • (Formerly BITS 2023)
Robotics
3
CH(s)

The purpose of this course is to introduce the fundamentals of robotics with an emphasis on industrial uses.  This course will build on other courses such as PLC’s and will focus on movement of both fixed and mobile robot bodies with servo control, microcontrollers, sensors and software.

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:
  • This course is open to Applied Process Technology, Power Plant Technology, Electric Utility Technology, Mechatronics, or Petroleum Technology majors only. Other students may be admitted with coordinator consent.
Automated Machine Systems
3
CH(s)

his course will apply previously learned concepts from electronics, mechanics, fluids, electrical machinery, and PLC’s to understand, maintain, and troubleshoot complex automated machine systems.

Other Info:
PR: Instructor Approval Required, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:
  • This course is open to Mechatronics, Power Plant Technology, and Electric Utility Technology majors only. Other students may be admitted with coordinator consent.
  • (Formerly BITS 2021)

Management

Principles of Management
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

The emphasis in this course is on the modern approach to the field of management. Theoretical and practical approaches are presented, along with analytical techniques that are applicable in the various management and production areas.

Office Management
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

Students in this course will study management principles as they apply to job analysis, production measurement, paper flow analysis, office design, work allocation and scheduling, construction and use of procedures manuals, forms design, criteria for equipment acquisition, staffing, supervising and motivating employees, labor-management relations, employee benefits, and information distribution and retrieval technologies.

Fundamentals of Human Resource Management
3
CH(s)

Fundamentals 

Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only
Fundamentals of Human Resources Management
3
CH(s)

This is an overview introductory course of the Human Resource Management function where students will learn the building blocks of effective human resource management. The class will focus on the fundamental Federal laws that affect human resources administration in every company large and small. It will also cover employee relations issues such as compensation, performance management, incentives and discipline.

Marketing

Principles of Marketing
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

 

A study of those business activities that direct the flow of goods and services from producers to consumers.

Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only
Salesmanship and Sales Management
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

This course is a study of techniques appropriate to personal selling and managing salespeople, both retail and contract.

Prerequisite(s):
COMM 2202, MKTG 2204
Note:

Students are given opportunities to construct and give presentations. 

Medical Laboratory Technology

Intro to MLT
1
CH(s)

MLAB 1101 is an introduction to the functions and duties of a Medical Laboratory Technologist (MLT), the significance of licensure, certification and registration, accreditation, laboratory safety, infection control, medical ethics, quality assurance, an overview of each area of the clinical laboratory, and professional standards of the medical laboratory technologist.  Students will also learn basic techniques of venipuncture through lecture and/or practice in student laboratory sessions. 

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

PR: Majors only.

One hour lecture per week. 

Clinical Immunology
1
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course covers the science of immunology and serology through the study of theories and processes related to natural body defenses. Included are the immune response, principles of antigen-antibody reactions, and the principles of serological. This includes performance of serological procedures used to aid in the detection or diagnosis of certain diseases. Throughout this course, special emphasis is placed on correlating of laboratory results with the patient's probable condition.

Corequisite(s):
MLAB 1101
Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

MLT Majors only

Clinical Serology
2
CH(s)

This course is designed to include basic immunology principles, theory and diseases related to antigen and antibody reactions and techniques. Laboratory methodology including serial dilutions will be performed. 

Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:
  • MLT majors have registration priority for this class.
  • One hour lecture, two hours lab per week.
  • MLT majors only.
Clinical Chemistry Techniques
2
CH(s)

This course is designed to familiarize students enrolled in Medical Laboratory Technology (MLT) with practical aspects of the clinical laboratory.  Through a combination of lecture and laboratory experience, students will be exposed to laboratory calculations, quality assurance, safety and manual and automated instrumentation utilizing basic chemical concepts. 

Prerequisite(s):
HLCA 1110, MLAB 1101
Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

One hour lecture and two hours lab per week.
Majors only.

Clinical Microbiology I
4
CH(s)

This course is an introduction to the study of medically important bacteria and parasites. The biochemistry, genetics, and physiology of bacteria will be discussed as well as methods of cultivation, isolation, and identification of these organisms. Life cycles of parasites and methods of identification will be studied. 

Prerequisite(s):
HLCA 1105, MLAB 1103
Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only
Note:

Two hours lecture and four hours lab per week.

Immunohematology/Serology
4
CH(s)

This course is designed to include the theory, applications and reactions of antigens and antibodies associated with the red blood cell. Serial dilutions, blood typing, blood donation, transfusion reactions, genetics, hemolytic disease, serological testing for infectious disease and quality control will be covered utilizing laboratory methodologies, case studies and computer tutorials. Three hours lecture and three and one half hours lab per week.

Prerequisite(s):
HLCA 1110, MLAB 1102
Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:
  • Three and one half hours lecture and three and one half hours lab per week.
  • Majors only.
Special Topics in Medical Laboratory Technology
0-4
CH(s)

Studies in special selected topics, to be determined by the instructor and approved by the School Dean.  Credits earned will be applicable as free electives in associate and certificate of applied science degree programs.

Note:
  • Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 1199 Special Topics designation. 
  • Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course.   
Urinalysis and Body Fluids
2
CH(s)

Through a combination of lecture and laboratory experience, students will study the theory and techniques of analyzing urine and body fluids, including the clinical significance of these analyses.

Prerequisite(s):
HLCA 1105, MLAB 1103
Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only
Note:

One hour lecture and two hours lab per week.

Hematology
4
CH(s)

This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the theory and principles in normal blood cell production, blood dyscrasias, and coagulation. Applications and techniques of measurement used in performing the complete blood count, coagulation studies, and special hematological procedures will be used in the laboratory.

Prerequisite(s):
HLCA 1105, MLAB 2217
Note:
  • Four hours lecture and one and a half hours laboratory per week.
  • Summer only.
Clinical Microbiology II
4
CH(s)

This course is a study of bacterial, fungal, and viral disease agents which includes the clinical laboratory methods of cultivation, isolation, and identification of bacteria and fungi.

Prerequisite(s):
MLAB 1160
Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only
Note:

Three hours lecture and three hours lab per week.

Clinical Biochemistry
4
CH(s)

This course is designed to address principles, procedures and disease states relating to the field of clinical chemistry. Abnormal laboratory results will be correlated to disease states using case studies. Laboratory safety, instrumentation, computer and laboratory information system use, and quality assurance will be stressed. 

Prerequisite(s):
CHEM 1102, MLAB 1105
Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only
Note:
  • Three hours lecture, three hours lab per week.
  • CHEM 1106 may be substituted for CHEM 1102.
Clinical Practicum I
3-4
CH(s)

This course is designed to orient the students to the Clinical Laboratory.  Students will be assigned to a major area of the laboratory (chemistry, hematology, immunohematology, or microbiology).  Laboratory safety, specimen collection including phlebotomy, specimen processing and analysis, data acquisition, quality assurance and sample validation, instrument troubleshooting, sample reporting including calculations, charting and clinical correlation will be included. 

Prerequisite(s):
MLAB 2219, MLAB 2220
Note:
  • Clinical serology and urinalysis/body fluid techniques and objectives will be completed in the appropriate major department.
  • 120-160 hours laboratory
Clinical Practicum II
3-4
CH(s)

This course is a continuation of MLAB 2221.  Student will be assigned to a second major area of the laboratory.  Additional skills and increased competency levels in specimen processing and sample analysis, data acquisition, quality assurance and reporting will be included.

Prerequisite(s):
MLAB 2221
Note:
  • Interpersonal relationships and basic techniques involving the major area of study will be emphasized.
  • 120-160 hours laboratory
Clinical Practicum III
3-4
CH(s)

This course is a continuation of MLAB 2222.  Student will be assigned to a third major area of the laboratory.  Additional skills and increased competency levels in specimen processing and sample analysis, data acquisition, quality assurance and reporting will be included.

Prerequisite(s):
MLAB 2222
Note:
  • Interpersonal relationships and basic techniques involving the major area of study will be emphasized.
  • 120-160 hours laboratory
Clinical Practicum IV
3-4
CH(s)

This course is a continuation of MLAB 2223.  Student will be assigned to a third major area of the laboratory.  Additional skills and increased competency levels in specimen processing and sample analysis, data acquisition, quality assurance and reporting will be included.

Prerequisite(s):
MLAB 2223
Note:
  • Interpersonal relationships and basic techniques involving the major area of study will be emphasized.
  • 120-160 hours laboratory.
Seminar
1
CH(s)

This course is designed to correlate the MLT students’ didactic knowledge with their clinical experience. Guest lecturers, field trips, computer and CD assignments and community interaction will be used as teaching tools.

Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only, PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:

MLT student in final semester of program.

Special Topics in Medical Laboratory Technology
0-4
CH(s)

This course will provide an opportunity for students to further their study of principles and concepts in the field and to apply their knowledge in a variety of applications both in the traditional classroom setting and in work/job related experiences. 

Note:

The class will be an individualized, arranged course, with learning outcomes determined by the instructor in consultation with the student and permission of the school’s dean.

Seminar & Case Studies
3
CH(s)

This course is designed to prepare students for successful employment hiring in the Medical Laboratory Technology (MLT) profession, including preparation for national certification.  The course will also enhance critical thinking and communication skills necessary in the clinical laboratory.  Each student will present a clinical case study and critique the presentations of other students.

Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only
Note:
  • MLT student in final semester of program.
  • Capstone course.

Mathematics

Intermediate Algebra
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This is a course in techniques for performing operations on polynomial, exponential and rational expressions and subsequently solving linear and quadratic equations and inequalities. The course will also cover equations and inequalities using absolute value and function notation. Students must enroll in a 2 hour graded support course in addition to the 3 hour math course unless they meet the pre-requisites below.

Other Info:
At least one listed Prerequisite/Co-requisite Required
Note:
  • Students will need computer access to use the online homework system required in the class.
  • MATH ACT score of 19, MATH SAT score of 460, COMPASS Algebra score of 36, Accuplacer Elementary Algebra score of 76, or ASSET Elementary Algebra score of 38.
Applied Technical Mathematics I
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course is an introduction to fundamental mechanics and techniques for performing operations with algebraic expressions, and subsequently solving linear equations, systems of linear equations and quadratic equations. The course also introduces trigonometric functions and is designed to develop methods of solving right angles and oblique triangles using trigonometry. Students must enroll in a 2 hour graded support course in addition to the 3 hour math course unless they meet the pre-requisites below.

Other Info:
At least one listed Prerequisite/Co-requisite Required
Note:
  • MATH ACT score of 19, MATH SAT score of 460, COMPASS Algebra score of 36, Accuplacer Elementary Algebra score of 76, or ASSET Elementary Algebra score of 38.
Applied Technical Mathematics II
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC
This course is a continuation of MTH 1201. Topics include solving radical equations and polynomial equations, complex numbers, exponential and logarithmic functions, inequalities and trigonometry.
 
Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1201
Note:

PR: MTH 1201 with a “C” or better.

Applied Math for Industry
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course is designed to meet the needs of energy related programs. Students in this course will study how to solve problems and interpret calculated and/or measured results as well as verify conclusions using specific algebra and trigonometry skills. This course will not transfer to any or from any other program as general education credit. Students must enroll in a 2 hour graded support course in addition to the 3 hour math course unless they meet the pre-requisites below.

Other Info:
At least one listed Prerequisite/Co-requisite Required
Note:
  • This course will not transfer to any or from any other program as general education credit.
  • MATH ACT score of 19, MATH SAT score of 460, COMPASS Algebra score of 36, Accuplacer Elementary Algebra score of 76, or ASSET Elementary Algebra score of 38.

 

Applied Math for Industry II
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course is a continuation of MTH 1203. This course is designed to meet the needs of energy related programs. Students in this course will study quadratic equations and applications, logarithms, exponential functions, trigonometry, complex numbers, vectors and phasors, graphing, basic statistics including standard deviation, logic and binary and hexadecimal number systems.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1203
Note:

PR: MTH 1203 with a “C” or better.  

Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics
3|5
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This introductory survey course is specifically developed to fulfill the General Studies requirements in mathematics. It is designed to strengthen computational skills while focusing on real-world problems. Topics may include critical thinking skills, sequences, set theory, logic, probability, statistics, consumer mathematics and the metric system. This course does not serve as a pre-requisite for any higher level mathematics course.  Students must enroll in a 2 hour graded support course in addition to the 3 hour math course unless they meet the pre-requisites below.

Other Info:
At least one listed Prerequisite/Co-requisite Required
Note:
  • PR: MATH ACT score of 19
    • MATH SAT score of 460
    • Accuplacer Arithmetic score of 85
    • ASSET Elementary Algebra score of 38.
  • If you do not meet these requirements, you will be required to enroll in a 2-hour support class.
Statistics
3
CH(s)
College Algebra
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course includes a review of real numbers, complex numbers, algebraic expressions, equations and inequalities, functions and inverse functions graphing, systems of equations, exponents and radicals, exponential functions, logarithms, and conic sections.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1200
Other Info:
At least one listed Prerequisite/Co-requisite Required
Note:
  • PR: MATH ACT score of 21 or MATH SAT of 500 or COMPASS score of 49 or MTH 1200.
Applied Statistics
4
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course is an introduction to statistics with appropriate applications. Topics covered include descriptive statistics, probability, binomial distribution, normal distribution, sampling, hypothesis testing and regression and correlation. A problem-solving approach and modern software will be used.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1202, MTH 1212
Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only, At least one listed Prerequisite/Co-requisite Required
Note:
  • PR: MATH ACT score of 21 or MATH SAT of 500 or COMPASS score of 49 or MTH 1202 or MTH 1212. 
Trigonometry and Elementary Functions
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course includes a study of circular and trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities, equations and graphs, vectors, logarithms, complex numbers, functions and inverse functions and related topics.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1212
Other Info:
At least one listed Prerequisite/Co-requisite Required
Note:
  • PR: MATH ACT score of 23 or MATH SAT of 540 or COMPASS score of 63 or a “C” or better in MTH 1212.
Applied Calculus I
4
CH(s)
S-PCTC

A study of calculus with an emphasis on its applications to science, business, technology and social science. Topics covered using the derivatives consist of functions and their graphs, max/min problems, related rates, approximation of change and curvilinear motion. Topics covered using the integral consist of area, volume and accumulation functions. Graphing calculators and mathematical software will be introduced and used throughout the course.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1202, MTH 1215
Other Info:
At least one listed Prerequisite/Co-requisite Required
Note:
  • Graphing calculators and mathematical software will be introduced and used throughout the course. 
  • PR: MATH ACT score of 24, or MATH SAT 560 or COMPASS score of 67 or MTH 1215 or MTH 1202 with "B" or better.
Applied Calculus II
4
CH(s)
S-PCTC

A continuation of the study of calculus as applied to science, business, technology and social science. The integral will be further studied, including applications of area, volume, accumulation functions, curvilinear motion, and solutions to some simple differential equations and other applications chosen from a variety of disciplines. Students will examine sequences and series involving convergence and divergence, power series and Taylor polynomials and series. The calculus of vectors and multivariable functions will be introduced and partial derivatives and multiple integrals will be used to study applied problems from a variety of disciplines. Graphing calculators and mathematical software will be used throughout this course.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1285
Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only, All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
  • Graphing calculators and mathematical software will be used throughout this course.
Calculus I
4
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course is the calculus of one variable, beginning with an intuitive study of limits and a geometric interpretation of the derivative. Topics include differentiation of functions and the application of the derivative to graphing functions, approximating functions, solving max/min problems and related rate problems, anti-differentiation and its link to the signed area under a curve, the fundamental theorem of calculus and applications of the definite integral.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1215, MTH 1286
Other Info:
At least one listed Prerequisite/Co-requisite Required
Note:

PR: MATH ACT score of 25, or MATH SAT 570, or COMPASS 73, or MTH 1215 or MTH 1286.

Music

Music Appreciation
3
CH(s)

An introduction to Western music, the music of other cultures and styles of popular music. Students are encouraged to develop their own perspectives, talents, listening/critical skills, and appreciation for the musical interests of others. 

Note:
  • Sound and video recordings of music will play an integral part in the class.
  • Attendance at live performances outside of class time will be required.
Introduction to Keyboard I
1
CH(s)
S-FSU

This course in beginning piano is designed as an elective for the student not majoring or minoring in music.

Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only
Note:

It is conducted in a piano lab setting which allows both individual and group participation.

Introduction to Keyboard II
1
CH(s)
S-FSU

This course in early intermediate piano is designed as an elective for the student not majoring or minoring in music.

Prerequisite(s):
MUSI 1102
Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only, PR: Instructor Approval Required, At least one listed Prerequisite/Co-requisite Required
Note:

It is conducted in a piano lab setting which allows both individual and group participation.

Functional Piano I
1
CH(s)
S-FSU

This course is required of all students majoring or minoring in music. 

Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:
  • Piano majors and minors with a piano emphasis may substitute Keyboard Accompanying or other applied electives.
  • Pre-Music or Music majors only.
Functional Piano II
1
CH(s)
S-FSU

This course is required of all students majoring or minoring in music. 

Prerequisite(s):
MUSI 1104
Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:
  • Piano majors and minors with a piano emphasis may substitute Keyboard Accompanying or other applied electives.
  • Pre-Music or Music majors only.
Guitar Class
1
CH(s)
S-FSU

This is a course in beginning guitar and is open to all students. Students will be introduced to staff notation for the guitar and chord chart notation. Basic guitar playing techniques from a variety of styles will be explored. 

Note:
  • The class is conducted in group format.
  • Students must own a guitar to participate.
Piano 3307 Upper-level Piano
1-2
CH(s)
S-FSU

One credit hour equals one half-hour private piano lesson per week. Two credit hours equal one one-hour private lesson per week. Students must consult with instructor for lesson placement during the first week of classes. 

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

Pre-Music or Music majors only.

Voice Class (first semester)
1
CH(s)
S-FSU

A study of the fundamentals of voice production: breathing, resonance, articulation, and style. 

Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only
Voice I-IV; 3341 Voice I-IV (last 4 semesters)
1-2
CH(s)
S-FSU

Open to students who have sufficient musical background and vocal quality to merit individual instruction. The principles of proper vocal production are stressed, with later emphasis upon solo repertoire in English, Italian, German, and French.

Other Info:
PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:
  • Section 1 - Music Majors
  • Section 2 - Open
  • Section 3 – Theatre Majors
Collegiate Singers
1
CH(s)
S-FSU

A large mixed chorus open to all students. The Collegiates perform literature from the Renaissance to modern and popular styles. 

Note:
  • Activities include one or two performances per semester and a spring tour.
  • Repeatable.
Marching Band
2
CH(s)
S-FSU

Open to students who play a band instrument or have the necessary skills to participate in one of the auxiliary units such as flags, rifles, or twirlers.

Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only
Note:
  • The Marching Band performs at all home football games during the fall semester and at various marching band activities such as parades and festivals.
  • Repeatable.
Wind Ensemble
1
CH(s)
S-FSU

The Wind Ensemble is a group of wind and percussion students performing the highest quality literature for the wind band medium in order to develop individual aesthetic sensitivity and awareness. Emphasis is on the development of individual and ensemble musicianship and performance skills through the study of diverse and fine literature for wind instruments.

Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only
Note:
  • Wind Ensemble is a one-credit course and performs two concerts a semester.
  • Open to all students.
  • Repeatable.
University-Community Symphony Orchestra
1
CH(s)
S-FSU

Open to all students and members of the community who can play an appropriate orchestral instrument, space permitting. This course is designed to present the study and performance of orchestral literature appropriate to the ability of its members.

Note:
  • Repeatable.
  • Admission is by audition at the discretion of the director.
Jazz Ensemble
1
CH(s)
S-FSU

Open to saxophonists, trombonists, trumpeters, percussionists, guitarists, bassists and pianists regardless of academic major. The ensemble involves study, rehearsal, and performance of selected literature of all styles and more specifically explores a variety of big-band, jazz, jazz-rock, Latin, funk and other styles of jazz music. The jazz ensemble works with a variety of soloists from vocalists to instrumentalists.

Note:
  • Jazz combos may be selected from the Jazz Ensemble membership.
  • The ensemble performs a minimum of two concerts per year.
  • Repeatable.
  • Admission is by audition at the discretion of the director.
Chamber Choir
1
CH(s)
S-FSU

Designed to give students experience in small ensemble participation. This group performs a wide variety of a cappella music.

Note:
  • Open to all students. 
  • Repeatable.
  • Audition at beginning of each semester.

Office Management Technology

Keyboarding
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course is designed to teach the touch control method of the alpha/numeric keyboard for the typewriter and microcomputer, as well as the ten-key numeric keypad. This course includes development of speed and control, vertical and horizontal centering, simple tabulation, memoranda, letters, reports, tables and interpretation of proofreader’s marks.

Note:

Open to all students.

Computer Concepts and Applications
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course will provide students with a survey of fundamental computing concepts and applications, and will offer a useful foundation upon which students can develop skills necessary to become effective users of information systems. The primary focus of this course will be on productivity software applications, including word processing, spreadsheet, database, the Internet and presentation software.

Note:

This course fulfills three hours of the First Year Experience. (Competency may be demonstrated through test out.)

This course was formerly called INFO 1100

Guided Experience I VAR
1-4
CH(s)

This course will be a guided experience for community college students to explore topics of interest in their field through research, field experience, presentation, computer applications, lab experience, or other project agreed upon between the student and the supervising faculty and is submitted to the dean in a written contract.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s), PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:

Credits earned may be applied as free electives in degree or certificate programs.

Special Topics in Office Management & Technology
0-4
CH(s)
S-PCTC

Studies in special selected topics, to be determined by the instructor and approved by the School Dean.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s), PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:
  • Credits earned will be applicable as free electives in associate and certificate of applied science degree programs. 
  • Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 1199 Special Topics designation. 
  • Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course.   
Spreadsheet Design
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This class was formerly called INFO 2220

This course is designed to introduce spreadsheet modeling and design. Through hands-on computer work, the student will become familiar with a spreadsheet application package. The course will stress good design techniques as well as spreadsheet techniques and model building.

Note:

Completion of this course will provide students with the skills needed to attain Microsoft Office Specialist Certification in Excel

Word Processing Applications
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course will provide advanced word processing applications with emphasis on formulating standard documents and printing using various printers. It provides an extensive hands-on approach to word processing functions such as: merging documents; creating styles, outlines, tables, and tables of contents; collaborating with others; customizing your work with features such a macros and AutoText; creating web pages; creating on-screen forms, and managing long documents. 

Prerequisite(s):
OFAD 1100, OFAD 1150
Note:

Completion of this course will provide students with the skills needed to attain Microsoft Office Specialist Certification in Word.

Database Applications
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course is designed to provide a foundation in the latest methods and systems of retrieving information and in planning, organizing and controlling integrated records retention systems in the electronic office. Simulated activities are designed to give students practice in storage, retrieval and utilizing appropriate software.

Note:
  • Completion of this course will provide students with the skills needed to attain Microsoft Office Specialist Certification in Access.
  • May be used as a business elective.
Medical Office Procedures
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course covers the development of office administration skills important to the effective management of a medical office. The course emphasizes a customer service approach to the profession of health care. Entry-level administrative and general competency areas outlined in the Medical Assistant Role Delineation Chart of the AAMA are addressed. Topics include today’s medical environment, patient relations, information processing and records management in the medical office, and medical office financial management.

Prerequisite(s):
HLCA 1100, HLCA 1170, OFAD 1100
Note:

Students are prepared for work as an administrative medical assistant in a private physician’s office, single- or multi-specialty clinic, or hospital setting.

Medical Billing and Coding
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course will cover the knowledge and skills necessary for basic medical insurance processing and coding guidelines. Medical insurance billing, including billing and collection procedures, insurance claim filing, procedural and diagnostic coding, and collection law will be covered. An emphasis will be placed on accuracy when completing these forms. Both electronic and paper claims will be reviewed. Procedural and diagnostic coding references will be used. 

Prerequisite(s):
HLCA 1100, HLCA 1170
Medical Software Applications
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

Students develop skill in entering, editing, analyzing, and retrieving patient’s data using specialized, industry-standard medical software. The course includes hands-on use of the software for insurance billing, coding of diseases, medical records, scheduling, workflow management, eligibility checking, and revenue management. The skills learned using this software are appropriate for medical and dental offices, medical billing services, and other healthcare settings. This course will also provide students with an introduction to medical transcription. Students practice transcribing recorded dictation of medical documents and reports using transcription machines and word processing software. The principles of English grammar, punctuation, spelling, and medical terminology are applied to the transcribed documents. 

Prerequisite(s):
HLCA 1100, HLCA 1170
Administrative Office Procedures
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course is an integrated approach to the required procedures in a business establishment. The course provides information on business principles and promotes a high standard of office ethics. Topics include telecommunications, mail processing, records management, conference setting, travel arrangements and office equipment.

Prerequisite(s):
OFAD 1100
Workplace Productivity
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course is designed to allow the student to synthesize the concepts and principles offered in the various courses of study. It will focus on the major office applications found in suite software; word processing, electronic presentations, spreadsheets and databases. Students will participate in exercises that use these applications to show the real-world significance of the software. In addition to computer applications, students will develop the critical thinking and decision-making skills which are expected of today’s office support personnel.

Prerequisite(s):
OFAD 2232, OFAD 2220
Microsoft Certification Preparation
1-6
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course provides review and preparation for Microsoft Office Application Specialist (Office 2010) exams. The exams include: Word2010, Excel 2010, Access 2010, PowerPoint 2010, Outlook 2010, and SharePoint 2010. Course content will include concept review for the exam being attempted, test-taking guidance and tips, and simulated exam preparation. Students are expected to possess skills in the Microsoft Office applications for which they are preparing; this class does not teach the principles of the software. 

Other Info:
PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:
  • One-hour credit will be awarded for preparation and attempt of one exam.
  • A maximum of three hours of credit may be awarded in a semester.
  • Each one hour of credit will require students to attend 15 hours of class time. Grading will be credit/no credit.
  • Students are required to attempt the exam to receive credit.
  • Exams may be attempted at the Fairmont State Center for Workforce Education or any approved testing center.
  • Certification may provide articulated credit for OFAD 2232, 2233, or INFO 2220.
Desktop Publishing
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

A beginning course which provides a foundation in the basic principles of page layout and design, as well as typographical conventions, coupled with hands-on use of computer hardware and applications. Students will learn desktop publishing skills by completing several practical projects.

Guided Experience II VAR
1-4
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course will be an advanced guided experience for community college students to explore topics of interest in their field through research, field experience, presentation, computer applications, lab experience, or other project agreed upon between the student and the supervising faculty and is submitted to the dean in a written contract. 

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s), PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:

Credits earned may be applied as free electives in degree or certificate programs.

Special Topics in Office Management & Technology
0-4
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course will provide an opportunity for students to further their study of principles and concepts in the field and to apply their knowledge in a variety of application both in the traditional classroom setting and in work/job related experiences. The class will be an individualized, arranged course, with learning outcomes determined by the instructor in consultation with the student and permission of the School Dean.

Note:
  • Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 2299 Special Topics designation. 
  • Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course.  
Professional Internship and Portfolio Development
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

The purpose of this course is to allow students to bring business topics into focus by using all their collected business knowledge. This will be accomplished through completion of a portfolio that will demonstrate to prospective employers the student’s career preparation.

Other Info:
PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:
  • The student will also be required to complete a professional internship; a total of 140 hours of supervised work will be required.
  • The importance of career and goal planning will be emphasized. 
  • Capstone course.

Paralegal Studies

Introduction to Paralegal Studies
3
CH(s)

This course is an introduction to the American legal system and an overview of legal topics including Constitutional, Criminal, Domestic Relations, Property, and Tort Law. The course will also provide the students with an understanding of the various roles and career options of the paralegal professional, legal ethics, and interviewing and investigation skills.

Introduction to the Fundamentals of Law
3
CH(s)

This course is an introduction to the federal and state legal systems. Information on the legislation and enforcement of laws as well as an introduction to legal reasoning and legal terminology will be covered. An overview of civil law, procedures and jurisdiction will be included.

Introduction to Legal Practice Areas
3
CH(s)

This course is a continuation of General Law I and will provide a general overview on substantive areas of law including: contracts, property law, forms of business, estates and the probate process, family law, criminal law and procedure.

Prerequisite(s):
PARA 1102
Interviewing and Investigating
3
CH(s)

This course emphasizes the development of the interviewing and investigative skills necessary to prepare paralegals for active participation in civil and criminal litigation and alternative dispute resolution under the direction of an attorney.  This course will focus on the application of good communication skills to conduct client, witness and expert interviews; the development of factual analysis and research skills to plan and execute an effective investigation; and the rules of ethics and evidence as they relate to interviewing and investigating.

Introduction to Landwork
3
CH(s)

This course introduces prospective land professionals to the activities which constitute landwork and lays the foundation for work as a land professional with an emphasis on landwork in the natural gas industry.

Guided Experience I VAR
1-4
CH(s)

This course will be a guided experience for community college students to explore topics of interest in their field through research, field experience, presentation, computer applications, lab experience, or other project agreed upon between the student and the supervising faculty and is submitted to the dean in a written contract. 

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s), PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:

Credits earned may be applied as free electives in degree or certificate programs.

Special Topics in Paralegal Studies
0-4
CH(s)

Studies in special selected topics, to be determined by the instructor and approved by the School Dean.  Credits earned will be applicable as free electives in associate and certificate of applied science degree programs.  Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 1199 Special Topics designation.

Note:

Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course.

Legal Research and Writing I
3
CH(s)

This course is an introduction to legal research, analysis, and writing methods. Students will learn how to brief a case, analyze case law, statutes, and/or regulations, research legal issues using a law library, prepare legal correspondence documents and pleadings.

Prerequisite(s):
ENGL 1108, PARA 1101
Legal Research and Writing II
3
CH(s)

This is an intermediate course in which students will perform legal research, analysis, and writing methods. Students will analyze case law, statutes, and/or regulations, research legal issues using Lexis-Nexis and other electronic resources, and prepare an appellate brief. 

Prerequisite(s):
PARA 2201
Computer Applications for Legal Professionals
3
CH(s)

Overview of software applications used in a law office including calendar, docket control, litigation support, billing, timekeeping, pleadings preparation, legal research, and other applications.

Prerequisite(s):
OFAD 1150
Civil Litigation and Procedure
3
CH(s)

This course provides an overview of the civil litigation process from initial interview through trial including preparation of pleadings and trial documents. The course also includes the study of the rules of civil procedure.

Prerequisite(s):
PARA 1102
Property & Probate
3
CH(s)

This course provides students with an overview of the process and documents involved in the transfer of assets.  Topics include trusts, wills and gifts, administration of decedent’s estates, probate procedure, federal and state death and income taxes, and fiduciary accounting and responsibilities.

Title Examinations and Abstracting
3
CH(s)

This course examines the basics of title examinations, courthouse research, abstracting computer platting, and real estate closings.  The course introduces the students to proper title examination techniques and etiquette and reviews the laws of conveyancing, wills and intestacy.  Students will conduct a title examination, calculate ownership interests, prepare a title report or abstract, develop and execute a plan for curative action, and explain the basic procedures involved in completing a sale or lease of an interest in real estate or minerals.

Negotiating Essentials
3
CH(s)

This course introduces the strategies, tactics, skills and techniques of successful negotiators.  Students will have an opportunity to apply those concepts, skills and practices in a variety of interactive negotiating exercises.   By becoming more aware of their own reflexive reactions, as well as those of others, students will be better equipped to exercise conscious control over the choices they make and the way they react in negotiations, conflicts, and other interpersonal interactions. 

Mineral Law
3
CH(s)

This course explores the laws affecting coal, oil and gas operations, including an examination of the nature and scope of property ownership in general and mineral ownership in particular; the legal rights of surface owners, mineral owners and operators and the protection of those rights; issues of joint ownership; interpretive problems in conveyancing; calculation of interests; an analysis of the types of documents used in the industry and their clauses; and the role of government regulations.  The course will emphasize West Virginia law.

Guided Experience II VAR
1-4
CH(s)

This course will be an advanced guided experience for community college students to explore topics of interest in their field through research, field experience, presentation, computer applications, lab experience, or other project agreed upon between the student and the supervising faculty and is submitted to the dean in a written contract.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s), PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:

Credits earned may be applied as free electives in degree or certificate programs.

Special Topics in Paralegal Studies
0-4
CH(s)

This course will provide an opportunity for students to further their study of principles and concepts in the field and to apply their knowledge in a variety of application both in the traditional classroom setting and in work/job related experiences. The class will be an individualized, arranged course, with learning outcomes determined by the instructor in consultation with the student and permission of the School Dean. 

Note:
  • Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 2299 Special Topics designation. 
  • Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course.
Ethics and Professional Responsibility
2
CH(s)

This course examines the basic principles and rules of ethics applicable to the practice of law for both lawyers and paralegals.  In addition, it provides the students with the tools necessary to identify and avoid ethical problems, while providing practical tips to implement in everyday practice.  Topics covered include the regulation of the legal profession, the unauthorized practice of law, client confidentiality, conflicts of interest, advertising and solicitation, client fees and fee sharing, competence, disciplinary procedures, and malpractice.   The course introduces the students to the types of ethical situations and dilemmas they may encounter as an important part of the delivery of legal services.

Paralegal Professional Practicum
3
CH(s)

This cooperative practicum allows students the opportunity to apply classroom learning to a work environment where they will acquire essential and practical paralegal skills under the supervision of a legal professional.

Note:
  • The practicum requires a minimum of 135 hours of supervised work.
  • PR: Permission.
  • Capstone course.
Paralegal Professional Development
1
CH(s)

This course completes the professionalism component of Paralegal Studies and incorporates all course work in the program through creation of a professional portfolio.  Topics include elements of paralegal professionalism, current issues for paralegals, opportunities for pro bono work, creation of an effective resume, good job interviewing skills and portfolio development.

Physical Education

Fitness and Wellness
2
CH(s)
S-FSU

This course is designed to provide an opportunity for students to make intelligent choices concerning lifelong wellness and to achieve optimum levels of fitness through regular exercise, proper nutrition, weight control and stress management.

Weight Training/Lifting
1
CH(s)
S-FSU

The analysis and application of the rules, boundaries, strategies, psychomotor skills and safety aspects of the individual sport of weight training/lifting are studied. The course is offered in eight-week sessions.

Archery
1
CH(s)
S-FSU

The analysis and application of rules, psychomotor skills, and safety aspects of the lifetime sport of archery. This course is offered in eight-week sessions.

Aerobics
1
CH(s)
S-FSU

The analysis and application of rules, psychomotor skills, and safety aspects of the lifetime sport of archery. This course is offered in eight-week sessions.

Badminton
1
CH(s)
S-FSU

The analysis and application of rules, boundaries, strategies, psychomotor skills, and safety aspects of the individual sport of badminton. This course is offered in eight-week sessions.

Bowling
1
CH(s)
S-FSU

The analysis and application of rules, strategies, psychomotor skills, and safety aspects of the individual sport of bowling. This course is offered in eight-week sessions.

Casting and Angling
1
CH(s)
S-FSU

The analysis and application of the psychomotor skills and safety aspects of the individual sport of casting and angling. This course is offered in eight-week sessions.

Disc Sports
1
CH(s)
S-FSU

The analysis and application of the rules, game strategies, psychomotor skills and safety aspects in the life time sport of ultimate and disc golf are studied.

Note:

This course is offered in eight week sessions.

Basketball (Beginning)
1
CH(s)
S-FSU

An introduction to the analysis and application of the rules, boundaries, strategies, psychomotor skills and safety aspects of the team sport of basketball.

Note:

This course is offered in eight week sessions.

Introductory Seminar in Human Movement
2
CH(s)
S-FSU

General survey of instructional and non-educational professional career alternatives available within physical education. Students will discuss issues, trends, history, philosophy, and future career directions in physical education.

Volleyball
1
CH(s)
S-FSU

The analysis and application of rules, boundaries, strategies, psychomotor skills, and safety aspects of the team sport of volleyball. 

Note:

This course is offered in eight-week sessions.

Table Tennis
1
CH(s)
S-FSU

The analysis and application of the rules, game strategies, psychomotor skills and safety aspects in the life time sport of table tennis are studied. This course is offered in eight week sessions.

Note:

This course is offered in eight-week sessions.

Tennis (Beginning)
1
CH(s)
S-FSU

The student will be introduced to basic skills, rules, boundaries, game situations and team play.

Flag Football
1
CH(s)
S-FSU

Addresses the analysis and application of the rules, boundaries, strategies, psychomotor skills and safety aspects of the team sport of flag football.

Note:

This course is offered in eight-week sessions.

Golf
1
CH(s)
S-FSU

This course focuses on the analysis and application of the rules, boundaries, strategies, psychomotor skills and safety aspects of the individual sport of golf.

Note:

This course is offered in eight-week sessions.

Pickle Ball
1
CH(s)
S-FSU

The analysis and application of the rules, game strategies, psychomotor skills and safety aspects in the life time sport of pickle ball are studied. 

Note:

This course is offered in eight-week sessions.

Track and Field
1
CH(s)
S-FSU

The analysis and application of the rules, strategies, psychomotor skills and safety aspects of the various components that make up track and field activities are studied.

Note:

This course is offered in eight-week sessions.

Soccer
1
CH(s)
S-FSU

The analysis and application of rules, boundaries, strategies, psychomotor skills, and safety aspects of the team sport of soccer.

Note:

This course is offered in eight-week sessions.

Speedball
1
CH(s)
S-FSU

The analysis and application of rules, boundaries, strategies, psychomotor skills, and safety aspects of the team sport of speedball.

Note:

This course is offered in eight-week sessions.

Philosophy

Introduction to Philosophy
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

A survey of the principal problems and theoretical responses which have come from man’s attempts to organize his experience and direct his existence. The ideas of individual thinkers (Socrates, Plato, St. Augustine, Bruno, Locke, Sartre, Heidegger, et al.) and schools of interpretation (rationalist, empiricist, pragmatic) are highlighted.

Great Philosophers
3
CH(s)
S-FSU

A survey of the historical development of western philosophical thought from ancient Greece to the twentieth century. This course is a continuation of PHIL 2200, covering the issues and philosophers in more analytical detail. The focus is on developing trends of thought as exhibited by the methods of the great philosophers, and the corresponding challenges presented by their critics.

Physical Therapist Assistant

Introduction to Physical Therapy
2
CH(s)

History of the physical therapy profession and survey of general physical therapy services. Legal and ethical requirements for the physical therapist assistant are introduced. The Americans with Disabilities Act and architectural barriers are studied. 

Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

Physical Therapist Assistant majors only.

Patient and Professional Relationship
2
CH(s)

Recognition of the reactions of the health care worker, patient, and family to illness and disability is discussed. The influence of race, class, age, ethnic origin, and gender on the physical therapist assistant and patient relationship is explored. The stages of adjustment to disability and death and dying are described. Communication skills between PTA, patient, family, and other health care providers are developed. 

Prerequisite(s):
PHTA 1100
Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only, Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below)
Note:

Physical Therapist Assistant majors only.

Introduction to Patient Care
3
CH(s)

An introduction to basic patient care procedures such as positioning, transferring, ambulating, dressing, fitting ambulation aids, and taking vital signs. Universal Precautions, isolation, and aseptic principles will be presented. Skills in basic note writing will be developed.

Prerequisite(s):
PHTA 1100
Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only
Physical Agents I
3
CH(s)

This course includes the lecture and lab study of thermal agents, compression, and massage. Skills in surface anatomy and goniometry are developed. Upon completion, students are able to correctly and safely apply these techniques in a laboratory setting while assessing the physiologic response and observing indications and contraindications. Note writing skills are further developed.

Prerequisite(s):
PHTA 1100
Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only
Physical Agents II
2
CH(s)

Therapeutic modalities are continued. Topics include electrical stimulation, traction, and manual muscle testing. Upon completion students can safely and effectively apply these techniques in a laboratory setting, write appropriate progress notes, and demonstrate knowledge of the physiological principles involved.

Prerequisite(s):
PHTA 1103
Note:

Summer Semester Only.

Kinesiology
3
CH(s)

This course provides a study of human movement and related mechanical principles. Topics include detailed musculoskeletal anatomy and physiology. Upon completion, student will be able to analyze a functional task and identify component joint motions and muscle actions.

Prerequisite(s):
PHTA 1100
Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only
Clinical Education I
1
CH(s)

Initial clinical experience for students. Forty hours spaced throughout the semester introduces the various settings of a physical therapy practice - acute care, transitional care, outpatient clinic, home health, skilled nursing facility, rehabilitation unit, and the school system. 

Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only
Note:

The student may participate in the clinic’s activities only if their skills have been checked-off in the course laboratory setting. 

Clinical Education II
2
CH(s)

A concentrated ten day, eighty hour clinical experience dedicated to modality application and the study of goniometry and manual muscle testing. The student will be assigned to a clinical setting that utilizes the modalities studied. The student will begin to assess patient response to treatment and be prepared to adjust the therapeutic intervention accordingly.

Prerequisite(s):
PHTA 1104
Note:

Summer Semester Only.

Special Topics in Physical Therapist Assistant
0-4
CH(s)

Studies in special selected topics, to be determined by the instructor and approved by the School Dean.  Credits earned will be applicable as free electives in associate and certificate of applied science degree programs.  Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 1199 Special Topics designation. 

Note:

Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course.

Therapeutic Exercise
4
CH(s)

The principles and techniques of therapeutic exercise will be introduced. Topics also include gait analysis, posture assessment, and chest physical therapy. Upon completion the student will plan, implement, and assess the response to an exercise plan in a laboratory setting. 

Prerequisite(s):
PHTA 1104
Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only
Orthopedics
3
CH(s)

The dysfunctions caused by and intervention strategies for musculoskeletal disorders, amputations, wounds, and burns will be examined. Upon completion, the student will be able to combine previously and newly learned procedures and strategies to carry out an orthopedic care plan in a laboratory setting. 

Prerequisite(s):
PHTA 1104
Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only
Neurology
3
CH(s)

The dysfunctions caused by and intervention strategies for peripheral and nervous system disorders will be examined. Upon completion the student will be able to combine previously and newly learned procedures and strategies to carry out a neurologic care plan in a laboratory setting.

Prerequisite(s):
PHTA 1104
Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only
Clinical Education III
3
CH(s)

This rotation consists of one hundred twelve hours over a three week period that will allow the student to begin the process of working within the physical therapy Plan of Care. The emphasis will be to implement, develop, and progress a therapeutic exercise program for the patient to address the impairments of decreased range of motion, decreased strength, decreased endurance, or motor control deficit. 

Prerequisite(s):
PHTA 2202
Other Info:
Offered Fall Semester Only
Clinical Education IV
5
CH(s)

This five week, 200 hour clinical assignment allows the student to apply all previously learned theory and skills to patient care in a clinical setting. Each student is assigned to a clinical center to perform physical therapy modalities and procedures on a variety of patients.

Prerequisite(s):
PHTA 2202
Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only
Clinical Education IV
5
CH(s)

This final five week, 200 hour clinical assignment continues with the correlation of the classroom/laboratory experiences to patient care. The progression of the student’s skills to “entry level” will be monitored closely. Each student is assigned to a clinical center to perform physical therapy modalities and procedures on a variety of patients.

Prerequisite(s):
PHTA 2202
Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only
Special Topics in Physical Therapy Assistants
0-4
CH(s)

This course will provide an opportunity for students to further their study of principles and concepts in the field and to apply their knowledge in a variety of application both in the traditional classroom setting and in work/job related experiences. The class will be an individualized, arranged course, with learning outcomes determined by the instructor in consultation with the student and permission of the School Dean. Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 2299 Special Topics designation.

Note:

Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course.

Capstone Seminar
2
CH(s)

This intense five week seminar examines the expectations for an entry level physical therapist assistant and focuses on preparation for clinical rotations and entry into the profession. Previously learned and new material relating to safety, plan of care, communication, professional behavior, and knowledge are tied to the role of the PTA.

Prerequisite(s):
PHTA 2204
Other Info:
Offered Spring Semester Only

Petroleum Technology

Technical and Physical Science
3
CH(s)
Appalachian Petroleum Industry and Career Options
3
CH(s)

This course introduces the student to the Appalachian petroleum industry from its birth along the banks of Oil Creek in 1859 to the current emphasis on the Marcellus Shale gas play and the Utica Shale oil play.  The lessons cover the growth of the American energy industry from West Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Ohio to the Midwestern states, and across the country including the Southwestern US. Next the course focuses on up-stream, mid-stream, and down-steam aspects of the petroleum industry before concentrating on various careers in drilling, services, and production in Appalachia. This class begins with an overview by the instructor and the students conducting research using the Internet. The students then make short presentations about their research using video slide presentations that they create. The course also includes a video slide presentation by the instructor on careers in the Appalachian petroleum industry.

Health Safety and Environment - Hazard Recognition
3
CH(s)

This course covers a foundational overview of best industry practices and guidelines for health, safety, and environmental issues facing the petroleum industry. Students will gain practical knowledge in a variety of topics to help them stay healthy, keep safe and protect the environment to allow them longevity in the petroleum industry. Hazard recognition is the study of OSHA standards and regulations as applicable to the oil and gas industry.

Note:

Full attendance and a passing grade of seventy percent are required to provide successful students with an IADC Rig Pass®/SafeLand USA certification as well as an OSHA 30 Hour certificate of completion.

Production Technology with Hands-on Lab
3
CH(s)

This course trains the student in tasks, methods, and procedures commonly used in the production of oil and gas in the Appalachian Basin. Major topics included in this course includes two, three, and four phase flow, production surface equipment, artificial lift, gauging tanks, thieving tanks, preparing oil to be run, gas dehydration, and gas measurement. The course also includes wellhead construction, and skills needed to use pipe cutters, threaders, tongs, and wrenches. Also included in the course is the maintenance of stuffing boxes, compressors, packing glands, and chemical injection systems.

First Aid/CPR for the Petroleum Industry
1
CH(s)

This course covers standard First Aid/CPR with specific topics applicable to the upstream gas and oil industry including how to handle amputations, impalement, eye injuries, severe burns, and snake and animal bites as well as insect stings and bites. In this training, students also learn basic first aid skills such as checking the airway, breathing, and circulation; recognizing and treating illnesses; controlling bleeding through the use of dressings, compression, and pressure points; the use of PPE; and the problem of blood-borne pathogens. The CPR portion of the training requires the successful application of hands-on skills using manikins. Applications will be made to work in the drilling, services, and production industries. Successful completion of this course based on attendance, academic performance, and hands-on evaluations can lead to an industry recognized certification in First Aid/CPR.

Note:

All First Aid/CPR certifications must be renewed every two years during your career in the petroleum industry.

Rigging for Land-Based Oil and Gas Operations
2
CH(s)

This course trains the student in proper and safe ways to use lifting equipment and rigging hardware in the handling of machinery, supplies, and loads. This course uses the Crosby Rigging Training Manual. Students receive the Crosby Rigging Certification for Land-Based Oil and Gas Applications upon successful completion of the class. The course trains students in load handling applications that would be appropriate when using hoists, rig-up trucks, cranes, forklifts, manlifts/aerial platform lifts and standard gin-pole trucks. Included in the course is training on the use of screw, hydraulic, and lever jacks.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1203, MTH 1201, MTH 1207
Other Info:
At least one listed Prerequisite/Co-requisite Required
Note:

*MATH 1003 with a Grade of C or Higher

Drilling Technology with Hands-on Lab
3
CH(s)

This course trains the student in the tasks, methods, and procedures commonly used in drilling for oil and gas in the Appalachian Basin. It covers fluid and air drilling. Fluid drilling includes water, oil, and synthetic based fluid systems. Topics addressed in the course include hoisting, circulating, and rotating systems, and considerations for safely operating those systems. The course also covers events associated with routine drilling as well as special operations. Hands-on training includes the proper and safe use of elevators, slips, tongs, and pipe spinners while making a connection or tripping the drill string.

Prerequisite(s):
PTRM 1100
Free Plunger Lift with Hands-on Lab
3
CH(s)

This course trains the student in the operation and troubleshooting of Free Plunger Lift (FPL) wells. Persons taking the course learn the proper application of FPL technology, applications of differing types of plungers to meet well conditions, and how to limit plunger arrival failures. In addition students learn the terminology and function of FPL components as well as basic calculations associated with FPL.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1203, PTRM 1104
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

MATH 1003 must be completed with grade of "C" or better.

Sucker Rod Pumping with Hands-on Lab
3
CH(s)

This course trains the student in the operation of sucker rod pumping (SRP), also called beam pumping, for the purpose of extracting liquids from oil, gas, and/or water wells. The course examines the various options associated with SRP as well as methods to minimize operational issues. SRP is the most common form of artificial lift accounting for 85 percent of the wells in Appalachia and the rest of the world.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1203, PTRM 1104
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

MATH 1003 must be completed with grade of "C" or better.

Introduction to Midstream Gas Operations
3
CH(s)
Summer Internship
2
CH(s)

A summer internship is a student practicum for the purpose of gaining experience while working as a temporary employee of a company in the petroleum industry. The student must satisfactorily work a minimum of 320 hours to qualify for two credit hours towards the AAS Degree in Petroleum Technology.

Prerequisite(s):
PTRM 1102, PTRM 1105
Other Info:
PR: Instructor Approval Required, All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

Additional Prerequisites: 

  • Minimum of 24 credit hours completed within the Petroleum Technology program with an overall GPA of 2.5 or higher;
  • Must meet all employer-related eligibility standards.
Special Topics in Petroleum Technology
0-4
CH(s)

Studies in special selected topics, to be determined by the instructor and approved by the School Dean.  Credits earned will be applicable as free electives in associate and certificate of applied science degree programs. 

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s)
Note:
  • Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 1199 Special Topics designation. 
  • Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course. 
Soft Skills/Leadership Skills for Technical Professions
3
CH(s)

This course equips students with crucial habits necessary to be successful and effective communicators and team players not only in their technical profession but in their personal life as well. Although this course uses many illustrations from the Petroleum Industry, the principles and concepts are applicable to other difficult technical industries. Role-playing scenarios simulate real industry environments such as a drilling location, a production location, and a well servicing location. The course addresses realistic industry situations that a new employee may find uncomfortable, threatening, or intimidating. Students will role-play to practice interpersonal, teambuilding, and leadership skills such as: integrity, effective communication, the power of a positive attitude, identifying positive role models, and projecting a professional presence. Critical thinking skills such as problem solving and decision making are included within the objectives for this course. Resume writing and job interviewing skills are topics covered within this course.

Well Completions Design and Operations with Hands-on Lab
3
CH(s)

This course trains the student in considerations that go into designing a well completion. The course cover the following topics: choices for casing program design, how best to access the petroleum reservoir(s), stimulating the reservoir(s), and the eventual means of artificial lift.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1203, PTRM 1104, PTRM 1109
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

MATH 1003 must be completed with a grade of “C” or better.

Applied Chemistry for Petroleum with Lab
4
CH(s)

This course trains the student in the application of the science of chemistry to upstream oil and gas operations. Persons taking the course learn the critical role that chemistry plays in all aspects of the production, drilling and services industries.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1203, PTRM 1104, PTRM 1109
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

MATH 1003 must be completed with a grade of “C” or better.

Artificial Lift
3
CH(s)
Supervisory Level Well Control with Hands-on Lab
3
CH(s)

This course trains the student in the tasks, methods, and procedures commonly used in well control for drilling, workover, and completion operations. The course covers the behavior of various types of drilling fluid and kicks encountered in well control. It particularly focuses on gas kicks and application of the general gas laws to well control. The course includes balanced, overbalanced, and underbalanced drill and is applicable to liquid based drilling fluids as well as air drilling. Included in this course is a lab using an IADC-approved computerized drilling simulator.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1203, PTRM 1109
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

MATH 1003 must be completed with a grade of “C” or better.

Gas Measurement with Hands-on Lab
2
CH(s)

This course trains the student in use of orifice measurement to meter gas with applications for field production and operations that are further downstream. The course examines gas laws applicable to measure, orifice measurement hardware, maintenance, and ways to avoid inaccurate results. This two credit hour class has one lecture and three lab hour per week during a semester or the same total number of hours for a condensed format.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1203, PTRM 1104
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

MATH 1003 must be completed with a grade of “C” or better.

Electrical, Analog and Digital Applications for Petroleum with Lab
3
CH(s)

This course trains students in the fundamentals of electrical, analog, and digital theory and applications used in the petroleum industry. Topics include DC and AC circuit analysis, electromagnetism and analog circuits that are converted to digital inputs. The course gives an introduction to basic applications of digital electronics while continuing an introduction to basic concepts of circuits and systems.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1203, PTRM 1104, PTRM 1109
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

MATH 1003 must be completed with a grade of “C” or better.

Petroleum Geology of Appalachia
2
CH(s)

This course introduces the student to the geological theory and science of the Appalachian Basin which not only is the birthplace of the world’s commercial petroleum industry but possibly the most significant source of natural gas and oil in the US for the 21st century. The northern Appalachian Basin covers all or parts of the states of West Virginia, Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York, and Maryland.

Prerequisite(s):
PTRM 1100
Hydraulic and Pneumatic Applications for Petroleum with Lab
3
CH(s)

This course trains students in the basic components and functions of hydraulic and pneumatic systems applicable to the drilling, production, and services industries. Topics such as compressors, actuators, valves, accumulators, filters, air treatment, standard symbols, pumps, basic gas laws of pressure and temperature will be covered as well as the physics and forces in applications. Upon completion, the students will have understanding of gas and oil applications including. The course will also cover pneumatic systems, schematic prints, components, fittings and the operation of a fluid power system.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1203, PTRM 1104, PTRM 1107, PTRM 1109
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

MATH 1003 must be completed with grade of "C" or better.

 

Advanced Internship/Cooperative Work-Based Experience
2
CH(s)

This advanced internship builds upon the PTRM 1120 student practicum for the purpose of gaining experience while working as a temporary employee of a company in the petroleum industry. The student must satisfactorily work a minimum of 320 hours to qualify for two credit hours towards the AAS Degree in Petroleum Technology.

Prerequisite(s):
PTRM 1102, PTRM 1105, PTRM 2200
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

Additional Prerequisites:

  • Minimum of 24 credit hours completed within the Petroleum Technology program with an overall GPA of 2.5 or higher;
  • Must meet all employer-related eligibility standards.
Well Log Interpretation with Lab
2
CH(s)

This course trains the student in well logging and log interpretation. It also covers maps derived from logging data. The course will use examples of well logs from the northern and southern Appalachian Basin.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1203, PTRM 1104, PTRM 1109
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

MATH 1003 must be completed with grade of "C" or better.

Well Servicing with Hands-on Lab
2
CH(s)

This course trains the student in knowledge and skills used in well servicing. Topics covered include rod servicing, tubing servicing, swabbing, cleanout, and other tasks.

Prerequisite(s):
PTRM 1104, PTRM 1109
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Pressure Pumping Operations
2
CH(s)

This course trains the student in the technology of pressure pumping operations as used by the Appalachian petroleum industry for cementing and well stimulation. The course covers equipment and techniques commonly used for cementing and reservoir stimulations. The course also debunks popular but erroneous myths about well stimulations.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1203, PTRM 1104, PTRM 1107, PTRM 1109
Other Info:
All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

MATH 1003 must be completed with grade of "C" or better.

Off-Road Diesel Forklift/Manlift Operations for Petroleum
2
CH(s)

This course provides classroom instruction as well as practical hands-on and one-on-one evaluations necessary to comply with the OSHA Standards for a person approved to operate an off-road diesel powered industrial lift truck, that is, a forklift. It also includes training on manlifts, also known as aerial platform lifts. Students will gain knowledge in general forklift safety, types of forklifts, and forklift operations. The training will include lifting, moving, and placing loads, with emphasis on rig moves, routine drilling support, and tool yard load handling. The course will also include manlift operations, safety precautions, and upstream petroleum industry applications.

Prerequisite(s):
PTRM 1107
Guided Experience
1-4
CH(s)

This course will be a guided experience for Petroleum Technology students to explore topics of interest in their field through research, field experience, presentation, computer applications, lab experience, or other project agreed upon between the student and the supervising faculty and is submitted to the Dean in a written contract.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s)
Note:

Credits earned may be applied as free electives in the Petroleum Technology AAS degree program.

Special Topics in Petroleum Technology II
0-4
CH(s)

This course will provide an opportunity for students to further their study of principles and concepts in the field and to apply their knowledge in a variety of application both in the traditional classroom setting and in work/job related experiences. The class will be an individualized, arranged course, with learning outcomes determined by the instructor in consultation with the student and permission of the School Dean.

Other Info:
May be Repeated up to max CH(s)
Note:
  • Students can earn up to 12 total credit hours for courses with the 2299 Special Topics designation. 
  • Zero credit hour courses must be attached to a credit bearing course. 

Physics

Physics of Light and Color
3
CH(s)
Physics of Light and Color Lab
1
CH(s)
Physics in Motion
3
CH(s)
S-PCTC

This course will be required for all students enrolled in the Graphics Technology program for students starting in the Fall of 2012.  It is designed to teach students the basics of motion in form of concepts and simulation using VPython.  

Note:

This course will NOT transfer to any or from any other program as a general education credit.

Introduction to Physics I
4
CH(s)
S-FSU

An introduction to elementary principles of mechanics, sound, and heat. A three-hour laboratory period each week supplements the three lecture-recitation periods.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1202
Note:

MATH 1115 or MATH 1185 or MATH 1190 or MATH ACT 24 or MATH SAT 560 or Compass 67 may be substituted for MATH 1102.
PHYS 1105/1106 substitutes for PHYS 1101/1102 in all programs. PHYS 1105/1106 is calculus based and is a more appropriate level of study than PHYS 1101/1102 for science majors and some technology majors.


 

Introduction to Physics II
4
CH(s)
S-FSU

A continuation of PHYS 1101; includes a study of electricity and magnetism, light and basic atomic and nuclear physics.

Prerequisite(s):
PHYS 1101
Note:

PHYS 1105/1106 substitutes for PHYS 1101/1102 in all programs. PHYS 1105/1106 is calculus based and is a more appropriate level of study than PHYS 1101/1102 for science majors and some technology majors.

Principles of Physics I
5
CH(s)
S-FSU

Students are instructed in the elementary principles and calculus-based mathematical descriptions of matter and energy, including mechanics (linear and rotational motion, force, work and energy, harmonic motion), fluids, wave motion and thermal physics. A 3-hour lab period supplements a 4-hour weekly lecture.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1285
Note:

MATH 1190 or TECH 2290 or MATH ACT 28 or MATH SAT 630 or Compass 89 may be substituted for MATH 1185.
PHYS 1105/1106 substitutes for PHYS 1101/1102 in all programs. PHYS 1105/1106 is calculus based and is a more appropriate level of study than PHYS 1101/1102 for science majors and some technology majors.

 

Principles of Physics II
5
CH(s)
S-FSU

Students are instructed in the elementary principles and calculus-based mathematical descriptions of electricity and magnetism, light, optics and modern physics.  A 3-hour lab period supplements a 4-hour weekly lecture.

Prerequisite(s):
PHYS 1105
Note:

PHYS 1105/1106 substitutes for PHYS 1101/1102 in all programs. PHYS 1105/1106 is calculus based and is a more appropriate level of study than PHYS 1101/1102 for science majors and some technology majors.

 

Physics of Light and Color
3
CH(s)

Course Description: Physics of Light and Color is an introductory physics course designed for non-science majors. Topics include the basic physics of light, optical instruments, the eye, and colors. This course includes 3 hours of lecture and 2 hours of lab per week.

Note:
Prerequisites: None. However, a basic understanding of algebra, logarithms, exponents and trigonometry is necessary. 
This course meets the following General Education Outcomes: Written Communication, Oral Communication, Quantitative Literacy, and Technical Literacy.
 
 

Power Plant Technology

Technical Physical Science
3
CH(s)

This course is required for all students enrolled in energy related technology programs. It is designed to teach students the basic concepts of physics, specific to the design and operation of a fossil-fueled electrical generation station. Topics include concepts of motion, thermodynamics, and electricity. This course is designed to help prepare students for the Edison Electrical Institute POSS/MASS exam. 

Corequisite(s):
MTH 1203
Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
  • Open to Applied Process Technology, Power Plant Technology, Electric Utility Technology, Mechatronics, or Petroleum Technology majors only. Other students may be admitted with coordinator consent.
Power Plant Fundamentals, Components & Theory
3
CH(s)

This course is required for all students enrolled in the Power Plant Technology program and is designed to teach students the major components and operating theory of fossil-fueled power plants. Topics include power plant overview, basic plant components, steam boilers and theory, introduction to level and temperature controls, feedwater, corrosion, fuels, draft and emissions.

Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
  • Power Plant Technology, Electric Utility Technology, Mechatronics, or Petroleum Technology Majors only.
  • Prerequisite:  Admission to the Power Plant Technology, Mechatronics, or Electric Utility Technology programs.
Plant Water Chemistry, Cooling, Fuel & Combustion Air Systems
3
CH(s)

This course is designed for students enrolled in energy related technology programs.  It is designed to teach students about the basic operating principles of water treatments, cooling towers, fans, coal pulverizers, and water and combustion systems such as circulating water system, condensate system, feedwater system, combustion air and emission environmental systems. 

Prerequisite(s):
PWPL 1160
Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
  • Power Plant Technology, Electric Utility Technology, Mechatronics, or Petroleum Technology Majors only.
  • Prerequisite:  PWPL 1160 must be completed with a grade of "C" or better.
Power Plant Instrumentation & Control
3
CH(s)

This course is required for all students enrolled in energy related technology programs. It is designed to teach students the basics of industrial instrumentation and process control and final control devices specific to the power plant setting. Topics include temperature, pressure, and level measurement; and final control elements, such as dampers and valves.

Corequisite(s):
MTH 1203
Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
  • Power Plant Technology, Electric Utility Technology, Mechatronics, or Petroleum Technology Majors only.
Advanced Power Plant Systems
3
CH(s)

This course is required for all students enrolled in energy related technology programs.  It is designed to teach students advanced systems such as main steam, extraction steam, lube oil, generator seal oil, and electro-hydraulic control and other plant systems.

Corequisite(s):
PWPL 1162
Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
  • Power Plant Technology, Electric Utility Technology, Mechatronics, or Petroleum Technology Majors only.
Power Plant Simulation
3
CH(s)

This course is required for all students enrolled in energy related technology programs. It is designed to teach students the typical power plant start up and shut down sequences and monitoring of a coal fired power plant operation. The course uses a plant referenced simulator that introduces the students to plant start up and integrated plant systems.

Corequisite(s):
PWPL 1162, PWPL 1172
Other Info:
Restricted to Specific Majors (see Note below), All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:
  • Power Plant Technology, Electric Utility Technology, Mechatronics, or Petroleum Technology Majors only.
Power Plant Safety, Tooling & Mechanics
6
CH(s)

This course reinforces academic content of the program through computer-based, interactive simulations that require students to apply content knowledge gained through other courses completed as part of this program.

Other Info:
PR: Instructor Approval Required
Note:
  • Capstone course.
  • Grade of “C” or Better is required.
  • Course is for students who are ineligible for PWPL 1995.
Power Plant Capstone (Internship)
6
CH(s)

Industrial worksite, such as electrical generation plant, boiler room or similar facility practicum.

Other Info:
PR: Instructor Approval Required, All Prerequisites/Co-requisites Required
Note:

Prerequisite(s): 

  • Students must have maintained an overall GPA of 2.0 or higher;
  • Students must meet all employer-related eligibility standards;
  • Capstone course.
  • Grade of “C” or Better is required.

*Ineligible students will be enrolled in the curriculum-based section of the course, PWPL 1194.

Political Science

American Government
3
CH(s)

A survey of the American political system, dealing particularly with the form and function of the federal system.